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1 - 10 of 299 results for: SOC

SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 3: America: Unequal (CSRE 3P, PUBLPOL 113)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 8: Sport, Competition, and Society

This course uses the tools of social science to help understand debates and puzzles from contemporary sports, and in doing so shows how sports and other contests provide many telling examples of enduring social dynamics and larger social trends. We also consider how sport serves as the entry point for many larger debates about the morality and ethics raised by ongoing social change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 11SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (CSRE 10SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. This class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United Sta more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. This class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 14N: Inequality in American Society

An overview of the major forms of inequality in American society, their causes and consequences. Special attention will devoted to to public policy associated with inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 15N: The Transformation of Socialist Societies

Preference to freshmen. The impact of societal organization on the lives of ordinary people in socialist societies and in the new societies arising through the processes of political, economic, and social transformation. Do the concepts of democratization and marketization suffice to characterize ongoing changes? Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 17N: Race and Politics: Perspectives on the 2016 Presidential Election (AFRICAAM 17N, CSRE 17N)

This course is intended as a seminar-based exploration of the complex ways that race has informed political behavior and attitudes during the 2016 Presidential election. The class is designed to introduce freshman to sociological ways of understanding the social world, and the rigors of college thinking more broadly. As a group we will explore the mechanisms through which race informs political behavior, while also paying close attention to the ways that politics also informs our understanding of race. The course treats ¿race¿ as multifaceted construct, with multiple (and often times conflicting) influences on political behavior. The course stresses thennconstructed nature of both race and politics. The course will be split into 3 parts. In the first partnnwe will explore the relationship between racial identity and political behavior at the individualnnlevel. The second part of the course will examine how ideas about racial groups shape politicalnnattitudes and behaviors, as well as policy outcomes. The third part of the course will explore hownnrace is used to mobilize political and economic actors.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (CSRE 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 21Q: Decoding our Emotions: Culture, Emotion, and Social Interaction

Are emotions the same across cultures and societies? Are women really more emotional than men? Where and how do we draw the line between ¿normal¿ expressions of grief and diagnosable symptoms of depression? What role do fear and anger play in American politics? Although most of us think that feelings are deeply personal and private experiences - comprised of physiological and psychological elements - sociologists argue that they are heavily influenced by social factors. In this seminar, we¿ll explore the social side of emotion¿including how they are socially learned, shaped, regulated, controlled, and distributed in the population as well as the consequences of emotion culture, emotion norms, emotion management, emotional labor, and emotional deviance for individuals, social groups, and society.nnnAmerican society - and its corresponding landscape of norms, behaviors, and beliefs relating to emotion - will serve as a starting point for our analysis; however, throughout the course we wi more »
Are emotions the same across cultures and societies? Are women really more emotional than men? Where and how do we draw the line between ¿normal¿ expressions of grief and diagnosable symptoms of depression? What role do fear and anger play in American politics? Although most of us think that feelings are deeply personal and private experiences - comprised of physiological and psychological elements - sociologists argue that they are heavily influenced by social factors. In this seminar, we¿ll explore the social side of emotion¿including how they are socially learned, shaped, regulated, controlled, and distributed in the population as well as the consequences of emotion culture, emotion norms, emotion management, emotional labor, and emotional deviance for individuals, social groups, and society.nnnAmerican society - and its corresponding landscape of norms, behaviors, and beliefs relating to emotion - will serve as a starting point for our analysis; however, throughout the course we will seek to place America¿s emotion culture in comparative and historical perspective. Students will read a broad range of texts and articles on the social shaping of emotion. Some of the readings will focus on specific emotions - including grief, anger, happiness, fear, and love - while others will focus on various aspects of emotion - including the commercialization of emotion and the role of emotion in politics and social movements. We will also consider how emotions are gendered and racialized across cultures. By the end of the quarter, you will have a better understanding of how our emotional lives are shaped by the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which we find ourselves
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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