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1 - 10 of 111 results for: PUBLPOL

PUBLPOL 14: Navigating Financial Crises in the Modern Global Economy (ECON 14)

What causes financial crises? What are the keys to anticipating, preventing, and managing disruptions in the global financial system? This course prepares students to navigate future episodes as policymakers, finance professionals, and citizens by going inside the practical decisions made in an unfolding crisis, from the U.S. government and IMF to the boardroom and trading floor. Students will learn warning signs of distress; market structures that govern crisis dynamics; strategic interactions among the key actors; and lessons learned for creating a more resilient system. Concepts will be applied to real-world experiences in emerging market crises, the U.S. housing and global financial crisis, and the European sovereign crisis, as well as prospective risks from China's financial system and unwinding of extraordinary central bank stimulus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Toloui, R. (PI)

PUBLPOL 19Q: Measuring the Performance of Governments in the U.S. (ECON 19Q)

Spending by federal, state, and local governments accounts for about one-third of U.S. GDP and governments employ more than one-in-seven workers in the U.S. For most U.S. residents, government is represented by a complicated web of federal, state, and local policies. There is an increasingly contentious debate about the proper role of the government and regarding the impact of specific government policies. This debate is rarely grounded in a common set of facts. In this seminar, we will explore how each level of government interacts with U.S. residents through government services, public programs, taxes, and regulations. We will examine financial results for different levels of government while considering the net effects of government intervention on the health and economic well-being of individuals and families. Particular attention will be paid to certain sectors (e.g. education, health care, etc.) and to certain groups (e.g. those in poverty, the elderly, etc.). Along the way we will accumulate a set of metrics to assess the performance of each level of government while highlighting the formidable challenges of such an exercise. Prerequisite: Econ 1.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 51: Microeconomics for Policy (INTLPOL 204A, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Bulow, J. (PI)

PUBLPOL 55N: Public Policy and Personal Finance (ECON 25N)

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 73: Energy Policy in California and the West (CEE 263G, POLISCI 73)

This seminar provides an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies and Western energy organizations in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures, in California, the West and internationally. The course covers three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies and Western energy organizations; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of the 21st century electricity system in California and the West. The seminar will also provide students a guideline of what to expect in professional working environment. nnSpecific meeting dates for the course are as follows: April 27 10am-2pm/ May 18 10am-1pm/ June 1 10am-1pm
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PUBLPOL 74: Public Service Internship Preparation (EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, URBANST 101)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

PUBLPOL 78N: Economic Policies of the Presidential Candidates (ECON 78N)

In nearly all polls, American voters rank the economy as one of their most important concerns. In the presidential election, much of the debate for voters will be on questions of economic policy. In this course, we will delve deeply into economic policy issues to understand options for government intervention and possible outcomes. We will combine economic analysis with political science methodology to understand efficient and implementable policy proposals.nnSpecific areas of interest will be taxation, budget, entitlement programs, economic regulation and competition policy, trade, demography, income inequality, and monetary policy. The course will incorporate other timely and salient policy issues as they arise during the course of the campaign. n nStudents will be expected to write a short paper and make an oral presentation to the class. A wide range of topics will be acceptable, including those directly related to campaign issues as well as other long-term economic issues facing the country.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 85: Environmentalism in California

Alternative Spring Break: With climate change posed to be one of the most pressing issues of the 21st Century, environmental preservation is emerging at a top priority. In addition to the federal government, state and local governments regulate the environment. In this course, we will learn about what environmental policy looks like in at the state level in California. Since the Golden State has an ambitious environmental preservation plan, there will be a lot of content. To make this class more manageable, we will be focusing on two areas specifically: water and energy. Finally, we will spend that last few weeks of the course learning about environmental justice, and specifically, how climate change impacts Indigenous communities in California and how the state is mitigating the impact. All major backgrounds are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2017

PUBLPOL 100: Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program

This course is designed to give Stanford undergraduates an introduction to civil-militarynrelations, leadership development, and operational aspects of American foreign policy.nAdmitted undergraduates will be mentored by a distinguished leader from the Army,nNavy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or State Department for all three quartersnof the 2019-20 academic year. These military leaders and diplomats are part of thenHoover Institution¿s National Security Affairs Fellows program. Each student will meetnregularly with his or her mentor; engage in directed readings and conversations aboutntopics of mutual interest; attend special class-wide events with senior American foreignnpolicy leaders; and invite the mentor to a student activity each quarter to buildnmeaningful bridges and share perspectives. At the end of each quarter, students writenshort reflection papers about what they learned and what they plan for the followingnquarter. Students are encouraged to devise original acti more »
This course is designed to give Stanford undergraduates an introduction to civil-militarynrelations, leadership development, and operational aspects of American foreign policy.nAdmitted undergraduates will be mentored by a distinguished leader from the Army,nNavy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or State Department for all three quartersnof the 2019-20 academic year. These military leaders and diplomats are part of thenHoover Institution¿s National Security Affairs Fellows program. Each student will meetnregularly with his or her mentor; engage in directed readings and conversations aboutntopics of mutual interest; attend special class-wide events with senior American foreignnpolicy leaders; and invite the mentor to a student activity each quarter to buildnmeaningful bridges and share perspectives. At the end of each quarter, students writenshort reflection papers about what they learned and what they plan for the followingnquarter. Students are encouraged to devise original activities with their mentors andnclassmates.nNo expertise in international affairs is necessary to apply. All majors are welcome.nSelection is based on academic excellence, extracurricular leadership, and interest inninternational affairs. Priority is given to applicants who plan to be in residence for thenentire academic year and those who have no prior or current exposure to the militarynor diplomatic corps. We are looking for students who have wide-ranging curiosity.nThe program is directed by Dr. Amy Zegart. To apply, send a cover letter and resumento Nga-My Nguyen (ngamyn@stanford.edu) by September 1, 2019.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Zegart, A. (PI)

PUBLPOL 101: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics, which means this is a course about individuals, identities, and institutions. How do Americans come to think andnreason about politics? What is the role that identities play in affecting the political judgments that individuals make? How do our political institutionsnrespond to the demands of a diverse public that disagrees about issues related to race and justice, income and wealth inequality, climate change, gunncontrol, reproductive rights, the power of the executive, and the role that government ought to play in the lives of the governed? And how do we makensense of this seemingly peculiar contemporary moment in American politics? These are not easy questions, but they are ones for which political sciencenprovides a useful foundation to guide our inquiry. The objective of this course is to introduce students to various concepts and theoretical frameworks thatnhelp us understand the messiness and complexity of American politics. In addition to classroom lectures and discussion sections, students will benrequired to apply concepts and theoretical frameworks to contemporary issues in American politics. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for 5 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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