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1 - 10 of 43 results for: INTNLREL

INTNLREL 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 61Q: Food and security (EARTHSYS 61Q, ESS 61Q)

The course will provide a broad overview of key policy issues concerning agricultural development and food security, and will assess how global governance is addressing the problem of food security. At the same time the course will provide an overview of the field of international security, and examine how governments and international institutions are beginning to include food in discussions of security.
Terms: alternate years, given next year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 62Q: Mass Atrocities and Reconciliation

This seminar considers the theory and practice of transitional justice as exemplified by diverse case studies, such as Germany, South Africa, Bosnia, and Rwanda. We will ask ourselves throughout the term whether and to what extent mass atrocities and grave human rights violations can be ameliorated and healed, and what legal, institutional, and political arrangements may be most conducive to such attempts. We will study war crimes tribunals and truth commissions, and we will ask about their effectiveness, especially in regards to their potential of fostering reconciliation in a given society. In every case we will encounter and evaluate specific shortcomings and obstacles, which will provide us with a more nuanced understanding of the complex process of coming to terms with the past.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 63Q: International Organizations and Accountability

International organizations (IOs), like the IMF, the World Bank, the United Nations, and others, have been widely criticized as insufficiently accountable. For example, some argue that states are not able to control IOs whose bureaucracies have grown out of control and run amok, while others argue that the real problem is that communities most impacted by IO activities, such as those receiving World Bank loans or UN peacekeeping operations, are least able to influence their activities. Still others contend that the voting rules by which states control IOs are outdated and should be reformed to remedy these problems.nnThrough readings, discussions and case studies, students will learn about a range of international organizations in order to better understand what they do and how they are supposed to be controlled. In addition, we will evaluate the critiques of IO accountability that come from the right and the left, as well as the North, South, East and West, and will analyze different mechanisms of accountability, both formal and informal. Students will have the opportunity to research and present on specific international organizations and accountability mechanisms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gould, E. (PI)

INTNLREL 64Q: Leadership and International Organizations

What do intergovernmental organizations like the United Nations, the World Food Program, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees actually do? Do these organizations simply act on the interests of the governments that comprise them? Or do they have some autonomy to pursue their own programs, plans, and priorities? Does leadership of these organizations matter for their performance? What dilemmas do the leaders or intergovernmental organizations face as they try to satisfy governments while serving people in need all over the world? This course will get at these questions through examining the lives, careers and choices of leaders of major international organizations over the last thirty years. Reading assignments will include memoirs and biographies of leaders of international organizations, as well as analytical and empirical studies of international organizations. We plan on inviting former and current leaders of international organizations to visit the seminar.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 82: The Ending of World War I: Three Perspectives

This course is required for those students who will be taking the BOSP Overseas Seminar, The Ending of the First World War and the Shaping of the 20th Century. Enrollment is limited to students who will be taking the overseas seminar, or are waitlisted for the seminar.nnThis course has three learning goals: 1.) to provide historical background on the war and the events and processes leading up to the ending of the war; 2.) to help students formulate possible research topics for the Overseas Seminar; and 3.) to acquaint the students with archival research in preparation for their time in London. The course will be taught from the perspectives of military history, political science, and literature. Each week we will meet to discuss the reading material.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 101Z: Introduction to International Relations (POLISCI 101Z)

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 102: History of the International System (HISTORY 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the development of the Cold War and nuclear weapons; the rise of China, India, and the EU; and the impact of Islamic terrorism. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenge of environment, health, poverty, and climate issues to the functioning of the system.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 103F: The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History (HISTORY 3F, HISTORY 103F)

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war. Students satisfying the WiM requirement for the major in International Relations, must enroll in INTNLREL 103F course listing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)
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