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1 - 10 of 239 results for: CS

CS 1C: Introduction to Computing at Stanford (VPTL 1)

For those with limited experience with computers or who want to learn more about Stanford's computing environment. Topics include: computer maintenance and security, computing resources, Internet privacy, and copyright law. One-hour lecture/demonstration in dormitory clusters prepared and administered weekly by the Resident Computer Consultant (RCC). Final project. Not a programming course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, S. (PI)

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 7: Personal Finance for Engineers

Introduction to the fundamentals and analysis specifically needed by engineers to make informed and intelligent financial decisions. Course will focus on actual industry-based financial information from technology companies and realistic financial issues. Topics include: behavioral finance, budgeting, debt, compensation, stock options, investing and real estate. No prior finance or economics experience required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Nash, A. (PI)

CS 9: Problem-Solving for the CS Technical Interview

This course will prepare students to interview for software engineering and related internships and full-time positions in industry. Drawing on multiple sources of actual interview questions, students will learn key problem-solving strategies specific to the technical/coding interview. Students will be encouraged to synthesize information they have learned across different courses in the major. Emphasis will be on the oral and combination written-oral modes of communication common in coding interviews, but which are unfamiliar settings for problem solving for many students. Prerequisites: CS 106B or X.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 11SI: How to Make VR: Introduction to Virtual Reality Design and Development

In this hands-on, experiential course, students will design and develop virtual reality applications. You'll learn how to use the Unity game engine, the most popular platform for creating immersive applications. The class will teach the design best-practices and the creation pipeline for VR applications, and will include tangents that explore sister fields such as augmented reality and 360 video. Students will work in groups to present a final project in building an application for the Oculus Go headset. Enrollment is limited and by rolling application only. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (INTLPOL 200)

(Formerly IPS 200.) Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

CS 43: Functional Programming Abstractions

This course explores the philosophy and fundamentals of functional programming, with a focus on the Haskell and Clojure programming languages. Topics include: functional abstractions (function composition, higher order functions), immutable data structures, type systems, Lisp macros, homoiconicity, and monads. The course interweaves a theoretical description of fundamentals with hands-on projects in Haskell and Clojure. Prerequisites: CS107 (or equivalent experience)
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 45N: Computers and Photography: From Capture to Sharing

Preference to freshmen with experience in photography and use of computers. Elements of photography, such as lighting, focus, depth of field, aperture, and composition. How a photographer makes photos available for computer viewing, reliably stores them, organizes them, tags them, searches them, and distributes them online. No programming experience required. Digital SLRs and editing software will be provided to those students who do not wish to use their own.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 47: Cross-Platform Mobile Development

The fundamentals of cross-platform mobile application development using the React Native framework (RN). Primary focus on developing best practices in creating apps for both iOS and Android by using Javascript and existing web + mobile development paradigms. Students will explore the unique aspects that made RN a primary tool for mobile development within Facebook, Instagram, Walmart, Tesla, and UberEats. Skills developed over the course will be consolidated by the completion of a final project. Required Prerequisites: CS106A/B. Website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cs47/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Landay, J. (PI)

CS 49N: Using Bits to Control Atoms

This is a crash course in how to use a stripped-down computer system about the size of a credit card (the rasberry pi computer) to control as many different sensors as we can implement in ten weeks, including LEDs, motion sensors, light controllers, and accelerometers. The ability to fearlessly grab a set of hardware devices, examine the data sheet to see how to use it, and stitch them together using simple code is a secret weapon that software-only people lack, and allows you to build many interesting gadgets. We will start with a "bare metal'' system --- no operating system, no support --- and teach you how to read device data sheets describing sensors and write the minimal code needed to control them (including how to debug when things go wrong, as they always do). This course differs from most in that it is deliberately mostly about what and why rather than how --- our hope is that the things you are able at the end will inspire you to follow the rest of the CS curriculum to understand better how things you've used work. Prerequisites: knowledge of the C programming language. A Linux or Mac laptop that you are comfortable coding on.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Engler, D. (PI)
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