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1 - 10 of 484 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 1: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 1S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 3: Introduction to Archaeology (ARCHLGY 1)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 4: Language and Culture (ANTHRO 204)

Comparative approach, using examples from many languages. Emphasis is on generally non-Western speech communities. Topics include: the structure of language; the theory of signs; vocabulary and culture; grammar, cognition, and culture (linguistic relativism and determinism); encodability of cultural information in language; language adaptiveness to social function; the ethnography of speaking; registers; discourse (conversation, narrative, verbal art); language and power; language survival and extinction; and linguistic ideology (beliefs about language).
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 6: Human Origins (ANTHRO 206, HUMBIO 6)

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

ANTHRO 10A: The Archaeology of Home

Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships, and the broader society they live in. Focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization, economic strategies, diet and status, rituals, and identity. Archaeological case studies to see how archaeologists identify reoccurring patterns in material culture found in homes or domestic dwellings to reconstruct household patterns and social relations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

ANTHRO 12: Anthropology and Art

Modernity. How the concept of art appears timeless and commonsensical in the West, and with what social consequences. Historicizing the emergence of art. Modernist uses of primitive, child art, asylum, and outsider art.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 13A: Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies (HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E)

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

ANTHRO 13SI: Zombies: Anthropology of the American Undead

The zombie apocalypse, affectionately known as the ¿Zombiepocalypse.¿ In this combination class on zombie history, ethnography, biology, and culture, we will explore the origins of zombie legends (or truths?) and how the undead have been represented in American culture for the past 200 years. Classes will include lectures, film clip viewings, literary analysis, medical anthropology components, and disaster survival planning.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 14: Introduction to Anthropological Genetics

For upper division undergraduates. The extent and pattern of variation among human genomes, the origin of these patterns in human evolution, and the social and medical impact of recent discoveries. Topics include: the Human Genome Project; human origins; ancient DNA; genetic, behavioral, linguistic, cultural, and racial diversity; the role of disease in shaping genetic diversity; DNA forensics; genes and reproductive technology.
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
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