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1 - 10 of 68 results for: FEMGEN

FEMGEN 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T, SOMGEN 205)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning and offers an optional service-learning component.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 17: Gender and Power in Ancient Greece (CLASSGEN 17)

Introduction to the sex-gender system of ancient Greece, with comparative material from modern America. How myths, religious rituals, athletics, politics and theater reinforced gender stereotypes and sometimes undermined them. Skills: finding clues, identifying patterns and making connections amongst the components of a strange and beautiful culture very different from our own. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gleason, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 24N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (CLASSGEN 24N)

Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Peponi, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 52N: Spoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality (LINGUIST 52N)

The many ways language is used in the construction of sexuality and sexual identity. How language is used as a resource for performing and perceiving sexual identity. Drawing on linguistic analyses of pronunciation, word choice, and grammar, questions such as: Is there a gay accent? Why isn't there a lesbian accent? How do transgendered people modify their linguistic behavior when transitioning? How are unmarked (heterosexual) identities linguistically constructed? Sexuality as an issue of identity, as well as of desire. Iconic relations between elements of language such as breathy voice quality and high pitch, and aspects of desire such as arousal and excitement. How language encodes ideologies about sexuality; how language is used to talk about sexuality in public discourses about gay marriage and bullying, as well as in personal narratives of coming out. How language encodes dominant ideologies about sexuality, evident in labels for sexual minorities as well as terminology for sex acts. Discussions of readings, explorations of how sexuality is portrayed in popular media, and analyses of primary data. Final research paper on a topic of student choice.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

FEMGEN 101: Introduction to Feminist Studies (AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, HISTORY 107)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

FEMGEN 103: Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines (FEMGEN 203, PHIL 153, PHIL 253)

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 253 or FEMGEN 203) The interdisciplinary foundations of feminist thought. The nature of disciplines and of interdisciplinary work. Challenges of feminism for scholarship and research.nnPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Longino, H. (PI)

FEMGEN 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning and offers an optional service-learning component.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 109: Looking Back, Moving Forward: Raising Critical Awareness in Gender and Sports (FEMGEN 209)

In 1972, Title IX legislation opened up a vast range of opportunities for women in sports. Since then, women's sports have continued to grow yet the fight for recognition and equality persists. Simply put, men's sports are more popular than women's--so much so, in fact, that people often make the hierarchical distinction between "sports" and "women's sports." But what would it take to get more women's sports featured on ESPN or more female athletes on the cover of Sports Illustrated? And, given the well-documented corruption at the highest levels of men's sports, should such an ascent in popularity be the goal for women's sports? This course will map out and respond to the multifaceted issues that emerge when women enter the sports world. Throughout the quarter, we will explore the fight for gender equality in sports through historical, cultural, and rhetorical lenses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 115: Queer Reading and Queer Writing in Early Modern England (ENGLISH 105A)

Considers the possibility of identifying queer reading and writing practices in early modern England as well the theoretical and historical obstacles such a project necessarily encounters. Focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. Study of Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, law, and politics on the other. Readings include plays, poems, and prose narratives as well as letters, pamphlets, and ephemeral literature. Both major and minor authors will be represented.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

FEMGEN 120: Queer Raza (CHILATST 120, ILAC 287)

Examination of cultural representations by U.S. Latin@s that explore the following questions: How is the mutual constitution of race/sex/class/gender theorized and represented? How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts and what is the function of sex in racial (self)formation? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and other structures of power? How do these texts reinforce or contest stereotypes and the "ideal" bodies of national identity? How do these texts produce queerness as a web of social relations?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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