2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 48 results for: SURG ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

SURG 68Q: Current Concepts in Transplantation

Preference to sophomores. Biological aspects of cell and organ transplantation, including issues that arise in the popular media. Diseases for which transplantation is a treatment, the state of the art in human transplantation, transplantation of animal tissue into humans (xenotransplantation), development of new tissue and organs in the laboratory (tissue engineering and cloning), and development of drugs and biological strategies to promote long-term survival of the tissue or organ (tolerance). How to write a scientific abstract, critique scientific literature, and research and present topics in contemporary transplantation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2

SURG 70Q: Surgical Anatomy of the Hand: From Rodin to Reconstruction

The surgical anatomy of the hand is extremely complex in terms of structure and function. Exploration of the anatomy of the hand in different contexts: its representation in art forms, the historical development of the study of hand anatomy, current operative techniques for reconstruction, advances in tissue engineering, and the future of hand transplantation.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Chang, J. (PI)

SURG 72Q: Anatomy in Society

Preference to Sophomores. This Introductory Seminar is for undergraduates who want to expand their understanding of the influence of human anatomy on the design of commercial products and prosthesis, and the performance of core strengthening exercises, such as: automobile interior design, headphones and ear buds design, exoskeletons and yoga/Pilates. Students will learn how societal advancements have evolved to increasingly accommodate human form and function. Guest speakers are experts in their fields of design, prosthetics and exercise. The laboratory component exposes students to human anatomy via cadaver material, 3D digital images, the 3D anatomy table, apps and models. By the end of this course, students will be able to: describe the concepts of anatomically correct automotive interior design; explain how properly designed head phones and ear buds aid in sound detection; explain how thoughtfully choreographed yoga and Pilates movements incorporate proper joint and muscle movement; explain how properly designed joint prosthesis aids in joint movement and muscle function; and, deliver group presentations using proper communication skills. The class is limited to 14 students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

SURG 100A: Virtual and Real: Clinical Anatomy and Sports Injuries of the Limbs and Torso

This undergraduate course is designed to teach human anatomy through radiographs, CT scans, MRIs and cadaver material with the emphasis on the understanding of common sports injuries of the torso and limbs. To aid students in developing their image interpretive skills, additional resources such as virtual interactive scans, the 3D anatomy table, and interactive digital applications will be utilized. This course divides the anatomy of the body into five areas; each area will be presented in a two-week block. In the first week of each block, students will develop an understanding of human anatomy through the identification of relevant structures on prosecutions (cadaver material), and in the second week, students will utilize this knowledge in the interpretation of radiographs, CT scans and MRIs. The anatomy will be taught in relation to common sports injuries; and, student projects will focus on the understanding of the anatomy and treatment of these conditions and injuries. The class is limited to 20 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

SURG 100B: Virtual And Real: Clinical Anatomy And Sports Injuries Of The Head And Neck

This undergraduate course is designed to teach human anatomy through radiographs, CT scans, MRIs and cadaver material, with the emphasis on the understanding of common sports injuries of the head and neck. To aid students in developing their image interpretive skills, additional resources such as virtual interactive scans, the 3D anatomy table, and interactive digital applications will be utilized. The course divides the anatomy of the head and neck into five areas: each area will be presented in a two-week block. In the first week of each block, students will develop an understanding of human anatomy through the identification of relevant structures on prosecutions (cadaver material), and in the second week, students will utilize this knowledge in the interpretation of radiographs, CT scans and MRIs. The anatomy will be taught in relation to common sports injuries of the head and neck; and, student projects will focus on the understanding of the anatomy and treatment of these conditions and injuries. The class is limited to 20 students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SURG 100C: Virtual and Real: Clinical Anatomy and Sports Injuries

This undergraduate course is designed to give students who have completed SURG 100a and /or SURG 1OOb, the opportunity to expand their knowledge of specific sports injuries through research and through the creation and deliverance of a grand rounds (45-60 minute) presentation. Students, with guidance by faculty, will work in groups and will each choose a specific sports injury to study. Students will be encouraged to use resources such as cadaver specimens, radiographs, CT scans, MRls, the 3D anatomy table and interactive digital applications, along with consulting experts in the field of sports medicine. Each grand round presentation will focus on a clinical case, and cover the patient's symptoms, medical history, clinical examination, lab tests, prescribed images, differential diagnosis, definitive diagnosis, treatment and treatment outcomes. The course will be given over an eight­week period. In the first week, students will be divided into groups, research potential sports injurie more »
This undergraduate course is designed to give students who have completed SURG 100a and /or SURG 1OOb, the opportunity to expand their knowledge of specific sports injuries through research and through the creation and deliverance of a grand rounds (45-60 minute) presentation. Students, with guidance by faculty, will work in groups and will each choose a specific sports injury to study. Students will be encouraged to use resources such as cadaver specimens, radiographs, CT scans, MRls, the 3D anatomy table and interactive digital applications, along with consulting experts in the field of sports medicine. Each grand round presentation will focus on a clinical case, and cover the patient's symptoms, medical history, clinical examination, lab tests, prescribed images, differential diagnosis, definitive diagnosis, treatment and treatment outcomes. The course will be given over an eight­week period. In the first week, students will be divided into groups, research potential sports injuries and decide on a specific sports injury to study. The second class will focus on each group developing a presentation outline and receive approval by faculty. In sessions three through six, students, under faculty supervision, will research and prepare their presentation, which will be presented to the entire class during weeks seven and eight. Sufficient time will be allotted for thorough discussion after each presentation. The class is limited to 16 students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

SURG 101: Regional Study of Human Structure

Enrollment limited to seniors and graduate students. Comprises two parts, lecture and lab, both of which are required. Lectures in regional anatomy and dissection of the human cadaver; the anatomy of the trunk and limbs through the dissection process, excluding the head and neck.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

SURG 101A: Head and Neck Anatomy

Introduces students to human anatomy of the head and neck through a dissection based course. Students use proper anatomical terminology to describe structures and their relationships. Emphasis on typical anatomy as seen in healthy individuals, with some examples of anatomical variation introduced through dissection and clinical cases. Ideal for senior undergraduate students who have completed SURG 101 or equivalent, are familiar with basic anatomy, and have some dissection experience. Prerequisites: Surgery 101 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

SURG 199: Undergraduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Adams, G. (PI) ; Albanese, C. (PI) ; Auerbach, P. (PI) ; Azagury, D. (PI) ; Barrett, B. (PI) ; Bertelsen, C. (PI) ; Bonham, C. (PI) ; Bresler, M. (PI) ; Browder, T. (PI) ; Bruzoni, M. (PI) ; Buncke, G. (PI) ; Buntic, R. (PI) ; Busque, S. (PI) ; Chang, J. (PI) ; Chao, S. (PI) ; Chase, R. (PI) ; Concepcion, W. (PI) ; Curtin, C. (PI) ; D'Souza, P. (PI) ; Dalman, R. (PI) ; Dannenberg, B. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dirbas, F. (PI) ; Dulong, M. (PI) ; Duriseti, R. (PI) ; Dutta, S. (PI) ; Eisenberg, D. (PI) ; Esquivel, C. (PI) ; Fox, P. (PI) ; Fuchs, J. (PI) ; Gallo, A. (PI) ; Garcia Toca, M. (PI) ; Gilbert, G. (PI) ; Girod, S. (PI) ; Gosling, J. (PI) ; Greco, R. (PI) ; Gregg, D. (PI) ; Gurtner, G. (PI) ; Harris, E. (PI) ; Harter, P. (PI) ; Hartman, G. (PI) ; Hawn, M. (PI) ; Helms, J. (PI) ; Hentz, R. (PI) ; Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI) ; Hill, B. (PI) ; Jeffrey, S. (PI) ; Johannet, P. (PI) ; Kahn, D. (PI) ; Karanas, Y. (PI) ; Khosla, R. (PI) ; Kin, C. (PI) ; Klein, M. (PI) ; Klofas, E. (PI) ; Krams, S. (PI) ; Krummel, T. (PI) ; Lau, J. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Leeper, N. (PI) ; Longaker, M. (PI) ; Lorenz, H. (PI) ; Lund, D. (PI) ; Maggio, P. (PI) ; Mahadevan, S. (PI) ; Martinez, O. (PI) ; Melcher, M. (PI) ; Mell, M. (PI) ; Menard, R. (PI) ; Milliken, R. (PI) ; Morton, J. (PI) ; Mueller, C. (PI) ; Muguti, G. (PI) ; Murphy, K. (PI) ; Newberry, J. (PI) ; Norris, R. (PI) ; Norton, J. (PI) ; Oberhelman, H. (PI) ; Pearl, R. (PI) ; Poultsides, G. (PI) ; Powell, D. (PI) ; Quinn, J. (PI) ; Raphael, E. (PI) ; Rhoads, K. (PI) ; Rivas, H. (PI) ; Ryan, J. (PI) ; Salvatierra, O. (PI) ; Schendel, S. (PI) ; Schreiber, D. (PI) ; Shelton, A. (PI) ; Sherck, J. (PI) ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI) ; So, S. (PI) ; Sorial, E. (PI) ; Spain, D. (PI) ; Srivastava, S. (PI) ; Staudenmayer, K. (PI) ; Sternbach, G. (PI) ; Sylvester, K. (PI) ; Taleghani, N. (PI) ; Trounce, M. (PI) ; Visser, B. (PI) ; Wall, J. (PI) ; Wan, D. (PI) ; Wang, N. (PI) ; Wapnir, I. (PI) ; Weiser, T. (PI) ; Weiss, E. (PI) ; Welton, M. (PI) ; Whitmore, I. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Wren, S. (PI) ; Yang, G. (PI) ; Yang, S. (PI) ; Zanchi, M. (PI) ; Zarins, C. (PI) ; Zhou, W. (PI)

SURG 201: Embryology

The course focuses on the structural development of the human body from embryo to fetus to early post-natal life. Topics include formation of the cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal systems, as well as common clinical conditions which arise from abnormalities of development. Course open to MD, MSPA, and genetic counseling students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints