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1 - 10 of 26 results for: SOMGEN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

SOMGEN 120: Compassion, Dignity and Empathy-Physician Communication Skills (SOMGEN 220)

As medical technology advances, research shows the human touch and the provider-patient interaction retains a critical role in the practice of medicine. This class uses fun and novel techniques to enhance communication skills and build empathy with others. Beyond clinical communication skills, we will learn how to be better communicators of complex medical and scientific skills with broader audiences, including the media. The class will meet with physicians who use social media to improve health literacy and with journalists who transform data into compelling stories about health and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

SOMGEN 121: Media, Medicine & (Mis)information (SOMGEN 221)

The media ecosystem informs patient's perceptions of medicine and willingness to engage with healthcare workers. It shapes the practice of medicine and has the potential to fuel epidemics of vaccine-preventable diseases and to spread misinformation and disinformation. This class takes on Twitter and other platforms to examine the use of social media by healthcare workers, health activists and anti-science movements, each leveraging platforms to push forward their own agenda. We'll talk to health journalists to understand the challenges of a 24 hour news cycle in covering complex scientific and medical issues and learn how to better share our stories and messages with the media.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

SOMGEN 130: Sexual Diversity and Function Across Medical Disciplines

Focus is on the development of personal and professional skills to address medical and health issues related to human sexuality across a broad and diverse range of ages, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual function. Guest lectures will cover sexual issues from multiple medical disciplines and health perspectives of children (pediatric), adolescents, and young, middle-aged and older (geriatric) adults (geriatric). Consideration of sociocultural (predominantly U.S) norms is explored, including religious values and taboos, and sexual practices ranging from ¿stereotypically normal¿ to asexuality, celibacy, polyamory, and kink, etc. Emphasis is given to medical issues, e.g. the impact of specific medications, hormonal therapies, medical procedures, disabilities such as spinal cord injury, and treatments on sexual function and other issues that one might encounter in a general or specialty medical setting. Each week will include an 80-minute (Tuesday) class with a pair o more »
Focus is on the development of personal and professional skills to address medical and health issues related to human sexuality across a broad and diverse range of ages, gender, sexual orientation, sexual practices, and sexual function. Guest lectures will cover sexual issues from multiple medical disciplines and health perspectives of children (pediatric), adolescents, and young, middle-aged and older (geriatric) adults (geriatric). Consideration of sociocultural (predominantly U.S) norms is explored, including religious values and taboos, and sexual practices ranging from ¿stereotypically normal¿ to asexuality, celibacy, polyamory, and kink, etc. Emphasis is given to medical issues, e.g. the impact of specific medications, hormonal therapies, medical procedures, disabilities such as spinal cord injury, and treatments on sexual function and other issues that one might encounter in a general or specialty medical setting. Each week will include an 80-minute (Tuesday) class with a pair of related lectures, lecture, or video followed by class discussion, or student presentations, and a 50-minute ¿Queer Medicine¿ (Thursday) class organized by a Stanford Medical student, with overall direction by Marcia Stefanick, Professor of Medicine (SCRP, Ob/Gyn) Director of the Stanford Women¿s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WSDM, ¿wisdom¿) Center.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOMGEN 150Q: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Biology and Medicine

This course explores and challenges the physiological basis for distinguishing human "males" and "females", expands the concepts of "intersex" beyond reproductive anatomy/physiology (i.e. beyond the genitalia), and discusses some known consequences of "gender biases" in medical diagnoses and treatments. The influence of gender (sociocultural) "norms", i.e. gendered behaviors and relations, on human biology is juxtaposed with the role of biological traits on the construction of gender identity, roles and relationships, thereby focusing on the interactions of sex and gender on health and medical outcomes. Problems that may arise by labeling conditions that vary in incidence, prevalence and/or severity across the "male-female" spectrum as "men's" or "women's" health issues will be discussed. In addition, the importance of recognizing the spectrum of sex and gender, as well as sexual orientation, in clinical practice from pediatric to geriatric populations, will be highlighted, with consideration of varying perspectives within different race/ethnic, religious, political, and other groups.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOMGEN 160A: Sexual Assault Prevention

This course series consists of a workshop component ( SOMGEN 160A) and a classroom lecture component ( SOMGEN 160B), which can be taken separately or concurrently. SOMGEN 160A, for which students choose one Saturday during the quarter, will focus on learning hands-on skills to reduce gender-based violence in campus communities. SOMGEN 160B, which meets weekly for 50 minutes, will focus on learning about the theory and best practices in sexual assault prevention programming and evaluation, including reading pertinent literature.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2

SOMGEN 160B: Sexual Assault Prevention

This course series consists of a workshop component ( SOMGEN 160A) and a classroom lecture component ( SOMGEN 160B), which can be taken separately or concurrently. SOMGEN 160A, for which students choose one Saturday during the quarter, will focus on learning hands-on skills to reduce gender-based violence in campus communities. SOMGEN 160B, which meets weekly for 50 minutes, will focus on learning about the theory and best practices in sexual assault prevention programming and evaluation, including reading pertinent literature.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

SOMGEN 203: Literature and Writing for Military Affiliated Students

Who gets to tell a war story? Everyone who is affected by war. So everyone. This class will explore short readings of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction written by veterans or influenced by conflict. We will discuss the importance of war writing as a medium of expression for veterans, a means of understanding and reconciliation for civilians, and the ways it has impacted culture as a whole. The work will include short reading assignments, in-class writing prompts and guest speaker(s), as well as one final 1,500-word project.nNo writing experience expected.nInstructor: Jacqueline GenovesenTA: Nestor Walters
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health (INTLPOL 291)

Open to graduate students studying in any discipline whose research work or interest engages global health. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses and who are willing to commit the preparatory time for a graduate level seminar class are welcome. The course undertakes a critical assessment of how different academic disciplines frame global health problems and recommend pathways toward improvements. Focuses on evaluating examples of both success and failure of different theories of change in specific global health implementations. Prerequisites: ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 208: Preparation and Practice: Law

Focus is on everyday activities of patent practitioners (patent agents, patent associates, and patent partners) and applying skills learned in medical, biosciences and physical sciences graduate studies to careers in Patent Law. Topics include: applying for positions, the importance of IP protection, licensing, overview of the patent process, drafting applications and litigation. Seminar lead by leaders from Morrison and Foerster.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
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