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1 - 10 of 21 results for: OSPKYOTO ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

OSPKYOTO 1K: First-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, First Quarter

Terms: Win | Units: 5

OSPKYOTO 2K: First-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Second Quarter

Continuation of JAPANLNG 1. First-year sequence enables students to converse, write, and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 1 if taken 2012-13 of later ( JAPANLNG 7 if taken 2011-12 or earlier)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

OSPKYOTO 3K: First-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Third Quarter

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 9K). Continuation of 2K. First-year sequence enables students to converse, write, and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Fulfills University Foreign Language Requirement. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 2 or OSPKYOTO 2K if taken 2012-13 or later ( JAPANLNG 8 if taken 2011-13 or earlier)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language

OSPKYOTO 5B: News Shaping Japan Today

Examine a wide range of topical themes affecting Japan and its society through selected stories from news media as these stories emerge. As such, this course is entirely reactive to national events as they unfold. Students have a significant amount of choice of topics they address, as they are able to select stories that interest them from a list of news articles, which changes each week.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1

OSPKYOTO 13: Contemporary Religion in Japan's Ancient Capital: Sustaining and Recasting Tradition

Japanese attitudes to religion and popular forms of religiosity. Syncretic nature of beliefs and practices drawn on a variety of interwoven concepts, beliefs, customs and religious activities of native Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Indian origins as background. Topics include: pursuit of worldly benefits, religion and healing, fortune-telling, ascetic practices, pilgrimage, festivals (matsuri), new religions and their image, impact of the internet, response of religion in times of crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Ludvik, C. (PI)

OSPKYOTO 16: Taiko in the Buraku Community: Human Rights and Creative Expression

This short course explores the potentiality of taiko playing as a method to help create an inclusive society, with a particular focus on the activities of taiko groups from the marginalized Buraku community in Osaka. The students will learn why taiko playing has been important to the community in the context of their struggle for liberation and changing nature of discrimination. Weekly workshops on taiko playing will be offered as an integral component of the course, and the students are encouraged to use this hands-on experience as a foundation to envision how the body-based artistic expression can be a tangible force in social and political movements for human rights.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

OSPKYOTO 19: Zazen: A Practicum in Zen Meditation

Zen teaching through practice and experience. Condensed practicum course where students receive zazen training and experience monastic life in Myoshinji, the largest Zen complex in Japan, under the guidance of Rev. Daiko Matsuyama, Deputy Head Priest of Taizo-in temple. Over one week, regular early morning zazen training sessions on site in Taizo-in temple plus visit to World Cultural Heritage site Ryoanji with a private viewing and workshop. Other aspects of monastic life such as temple cleaning, and learning how to rake and care for the dry gardens at Taizo-in. Course culminates in an overnight zazen training session in Myoshinji's magnificent Hatto Dharma Hall. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1

OSPKYOTO 21K: Second-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, First Quarter

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 17K.) Goal is to further develop and enhance spoken and written Japanese in order to handle advanced concepts such as comparison and contrast of the two cultures, descriptions of incidents, and social issues. 800 kanji, 1,400 new words, and higher-level grammatical constructions. Readings include authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and essays. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 3 if taken 2012-13 or later ( JAPANLNG 7 if taken 2011-12 or earlier)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language

OSPKYOTO 23K: Second-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Third Quarter

Formerly OSPKYOTO 19K). Goal is to further develop and enhance spoken and written Japanese in order to handle advanced concepts such as comparison and contrast of the two cultures, descriptions of incidents, and social issues. 800 kanji, 1,400 new words, and higher-level grammatical constructions. Readings include authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and essays. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 22 or OSPKYOTO 22K if taken 2012-13 or later ( JAPANLNG 18 if taken 2011-12 or earlier)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

OSPKYOTO 25: Japan and China in the Early Modern World

Japan and China during their transition to modernity, in the context of successive waves of interaction and globalization. By the 16th century, when Europeans reached East Asia, China's Ming Dynasty and Japan's Muromachi Shogunate ruled over two of the most populous, urbanized, and sophisticated societies in the world¿with China the superior regional power. In the late 19th century, that longstanding status quo was abruptly upended. European and American steamships dominated the Pacific, China was in the throes of social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its modernization and march to empire.nUsing short primary sources (fiction, memoirs, and historical documents) and field trips, we will study the dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies, highlighting connections and contrasts, as well as the impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian po more »
Japan and China during their transition to modernity, in the context of successive waves of interaction and globalization. By the 16th century, when Europeans reached East Asia, China's Ming Dynasty and Japan's Muromachi Shogunate ruled over two of the most populous, urbanized, and sophisticated societies in the world¿with China the superior regional power. In the late 19th century, that longstanding status quo was abruptly upended. European and American steamships dominated the Pacific, China was in the throes of social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its modernization and march to empire.nUsing short primary sources (fiction, memoirs, and historical documents) and field trips, we will study the dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies, highlighting connections and contrasts, as well as the impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian powers?nConfucianism, and the Chinese model of statecraft, which can be seen in the temples and other historical sites of Kyoto, as well as in the layout of the city (modeled on the Tang capital of Chang'an). By the 16th century, when European merchants and missionaries first reached East Asia, the Ming Empire and the Muromachi Shogunate comprised two of the most populous, urbanized, economically advanced, and culturally sophisticated societies in the world-with China clearly the superior regional power. By the early twentieth century, that status quo had been turned on its head. European and American steamships now dominated the Pacific, China was in the throes of social and political upheaval, and Japan had begun its modernization and march to empire. Japan's defeat of China in 1895 marked its debut as a major power; soon Japan would seize Korea and begin encroaching on China's Manchurian territories. nUsing textual sources (fiction, memoirs, and historical documents in English translation), as well as field trips to nhistorical sites and museums, we will study the historical dynamics of Japanese and Chinese societies during these centuries, highlighting their connections and contrasts, as well as the profound impact that each has had on the other. How did Sino-Japanese relations in the early modern era lay the foundations for the current fraught relationship between these two East Asian powers?
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5
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