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1 - 10 of 31 results for: MGTECON ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MGTECON 200: Managerial Economics

MGTECON 200 is a base-level course in microeconomics. It covers microeconomic concepts relevant to management, including the economics of relationships, pricing decisions, perfect competition and the "invisible hand," risk aversion and risk sharing, and moral hazard and adverse selection. This year we are piloting a "flipped classroom" where students will be expected to work through the online modules before each class and the time in class will be devoted to solving problems and discussing cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MGTECON 203: Managerial Economics - Accelerated

MGTECON 203 is the more quantitative version of MGTECON 200. It uses basic math such as derivatives and algebra, as opposed to excel simulations and plots. Previous knowledge of economics is not necessary. The business world has become more quantitative and economics-oriented in the last 30 years, but many of the key ideas in economics, relating to topics such as pricing, monopoly, imperfect competition, game theory, moral hazard and adverse selection, public choice, externalities, risk aversion, capital market pricing and equilibrium, and auction theory can all be usefully approached with a relatively small amount of math. The goal is to develop a small number of intellectual tools that enables one to analyze a wide variety of economic problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Lambert, N. (PI)

MGTECON 300: Growth and Stabilization in the Global Economy

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy. By the end of the course, students should be able to read and understand the discussions of economic issues in The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, or the Congressional Budget Office.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MGTECON 331: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the US. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MGTECON 349: Smart Pricing and Market Design

This course is an Advanced Applications option in the Economics menu. The focus of the course is on pricing mechanisms and the design of marketplaces. The pricing component of the course will handle both traditional topics, such as price differentiation, and more modern ones, such as bundling and dynamic pricing. In the market design component of the course, we will consider such topics as auctions (e.g., designing auctions for selling online advertising slots) and matching (e.g., designing mechanisms for matching students to schools).
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MGTECON 526: Inclusive Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Developing Countries

Poverty rates have fallen markedly in countries around the world, as more households have joined the lower middle-class. Indeed, though U.S. income inequality has increased, inequality has fallen around the world. However, by developed country standards, poverty remains pervasive. What has caused the decline in rates of poverty and can we expect further decreases or can we act to accelerate the improvements? One answer is that countries that have experienced "inclusive growth", in which the growth of the economy (i.e., GDP) has elevated the incomes of the poor, have done better at creating jobs for the poor, especially in the private sector. Therefore, the class will consider the evidence on the factors that have contributed to inclusive economic growth in developing countries. A second answer as to why poverty has fallen, but remains at high levels, is that governments and aid agencies and foundations have targeted programs to the poor. This course discusses macroeconomic policy, targ more »
Poverty rates have fallen markedly in countries around the world, as more households have joined the lower middle-class. Indeed, though U.S. income inequality has increased, inequality has fallen around the world. However, by developed country standards, poverty remains pervasive. What has caused the decline in rates of poverty and can we expect further decreases or can we act to accelerate the improvements? One answer is that countries that have experienced "inclusive growth", in which the growth of the economy (i.e., GDP) has elevated the incomes of the poor, have done better at creating jobs for the poor, especially in the private sector. Therefore, the class will consider the evidence on the factors that have contributed to inclusive economic growth in developing countries. A second answer as to why poverty has fallen, but remains at high levels, is that governments and aid agencies and foundations have targeted programs to the poor. This course discusses macroeconomic policy, targeted government policies, aid, and entrepreneurship in developing countries. Examples will be given from Latin America, South Asia, and Africa. The course is co-taught by a Stanford economist and a World Bank consultant and will build on examples from recent experiences. The class is aimed at GSB students who are either intellectually curious about the topic or anticipate doing business in developing countries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

MGTECON 533: Economics of Strategy and Organization

The goal of this class is to combine economic theory and business practice to develop insights for business strategy and organization design. We will discuss strategies and organizations of companies, identify potential problems and explore potential solutions. Some of the topics to be covered will be why many established companies find it hard to innovate (and what strategies can mitigate those problems), business-model innovation, and what economic and practical problems arise when companies need to stop projects. The course will be based on a mixture of formal and informal cases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

MGTECON 600: Microeconomic Analysis I

This course provides an introduction to the foundations of modern microeconomic theory. Topics include choice theory, with and without uncertainty, consumer and producer theory, dynamic choice and dynamic programming, social choice and efficiency, and fundamentals of general equilibrium.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

MGTECON 601: Microeconomic Analysis II

This course studies the roles of information, incentives and strategic behavior in markets. The rudiments of game theory are developed and applied to selected topics regarding auctions, bargaining, and firms' competitive strategies; information economics; and contracting and market design.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Wilson, R. (PI)

MGTECON 602: Auctions, Bargaining, and Pricing

This course covers mostly auction theory, bargaining theory and related parts of the literature on pricing. Key classic papers covered in the course are Myerson and Satterthwaite on dynamic bargaining, Myerson on optimal auctions, and Milgrom and Weber's classic work, the Coase Conjecture results. We also cover a few more recent developments related to these topics, including dynamic signaling and screening. In some years we also cover topics in matching theory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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