2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 165 results for: ME ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ME 1: Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

This course is intended to be the starting point for Mechanical Engineering majors. It will cover the concepts, engineering methods, and common tools used by mechanical engineers while introducing the students to a few interesting devices. We will discuss how each device was conceived, design challenges that arose, application of analytical tools to the design, and production methods. Main class sections will include lectures, demonstrations, and in-class group exercises. Lab sections will develop specific skills in freehand sketching and computational modeling of engineering systems. Prerequisites: Physics: Mechanics, and first quarter Calculus.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

ME 15AX: Voluminous Design

This class aims to provide a synthesis of design and technique in metalworking. When using precious metals (silver and bronze) the scale of the works naturally becomes much smaller than other design endeavors. This intimate size allows for attention to detail and refinement not common or often considered in other areas of design. The method involves creating a piece out of wax, and going through a process to achieve that piece in metal. All projects will center on this process. Students will complete complete three projects, a quick-start ring, a client design theme project and a belt. Sara and Amanda have been teaching ME298: Silversmithing in Design at Stanford for 17 years, they are full time designers at RedStart Design, LLC and also Lecturers in Design in the Mechanical Engineering Department.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

ME 17: The Science of Flames

This course is about what causes flames to look like they do and about what causes them to propagate. The physical and chemical phenomena that govern behaviors of flames will constitute the topics for discussion. The basic principles that govern flame phenomena include the conservation of mass, the first law of thermodynamics, and the momentum principle. Since flame processes are controlled by the rates of chemical reactions, these basic principles will be applied when account is made for the chemical transformations that occur when reactant bonds are broken and new bonds are formed, producing combustion products. In essence, this course serves as an introduction to combustion science.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitchell, R. (PI)

ME 23N: Soft Robots for Humanity

While traditional robotic manipulators are constructed from rigid links and simple joints, a new generation of robotic devices are soft, using flexible, deformable materials. Students in this class will get hands-on experience building soft robots using various materials, actuators, and programming to create robots that perform different tasks. Through this process, students will gain an appreciation for the capabilities and limitations of bio-inspired systems, use design thinking to create novel robotic solutions, and gain practical interdisciplinary engineering skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Okamura, A. (PI)

ME 30: Engineering Thermodynamics

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3

ME 70: Introductory Fluids Engineering

Elements of fluid mechanics as applied to engineering problems. Equations of motion for incompressible flow. Hydrostatics. Control volume laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Bernoulli equation. Differential equations of fluid flow. Euler equations. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Internal flows. Introductory external boundary layer flows. Introductory lift and drag. ENGR14 and ME30 required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE

ME 102: Foundations of Product Realization

Students develop the language and toolset to transform design concepts into tangible models/prototypes that cultivate the emergence of mechanical aptitude. Visual communication tools such as sketching, orthographic projection, and 2D/3D design software are introduced in the context of design and prototyping assignments. Instruction and practice with hand, powered, and digital prototyping tools in the Product Realization Lab support students implementation and iteration of physical project work. Project documentation, reflection, and in-class presentations are opportunities for students to find their design voice and practice sharing it with others.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3

ME 103: Product Realization: Design and Making

Students will build on the foundation created in ME102. ME103 includes structured labs in machining, casting, forming and welding; carrying a single project through the entire design process from conceptualization through presentation of a customer ready prototype, creation of a project based portfolio, and an introduction to manufacturing processes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Beach, D. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints