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1 - 10 of 73 results for: MATSCI ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MATSCI 13SC: Science of the Impossible

Imagine a world where cancer is cured with light, objects can be made invisible, and teleportation is allowed through space and time. The future once envisioned by science fiction writers is now becoming a reality, thanks to advances in materials science and engineering. This seminar will explore "impossible" technologies¿those that have shaped our past and those that promise to revolutionize the future. Attention will be given to both the science and the societal impact of these technologies. We will begin by investigating breakthroughs from the 20th century that seemed impossible in the early 1900s, such as the invention of integrated circuits and the discovery of chemotherapy. We will then discuss the scientific breakthroughs that enabled modern "impossible" science, such as photodynamic cancer therapeutics, invisibility, and mind-reading through advanced brain imaging. Lastly, we will explore technologies currently perceived as completely impossible, and brainstorm the breakthroughs needed to make such science fiction a reality.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Dionne, J. (PI)

MATSCI 31: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (CHEM 31M)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials and environmental science and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will emphasize bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory. Lectures will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techni more »
A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials and environmental science and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will emphasize bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory. Lectures will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions and laboratories will emphasize the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites and organic dyes used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials made with only carbon atoms: diamond, graphite, graphene. There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. Students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 should take CHEM 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are welcome to take CHEM 31M, as a refresher, or will receive credit for CHEM 31M. Students who have taken AP chemistry, but scored a 3 or lower, are welcome to take the placement test to place into CHEM 31M. CHEM 31M cannot be used to replace grades earned in CHEM 31X because previously given the courses are not equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 90Q: Resilience, Transformation, and Equilibrium: the Science of Materials

In this course, we will explore the fundamentals of the kinetics of materials while relating them to different phenomena that we observe in our everyday lives. We will study the mechanisms and processes by which materials obtain the mechanical, electronic, and other properties that make them so useful to us. How can we cool water below freezing and keep it from turning into ice? Why is it that ice cream that has been in the freezer for too long does not taste as good? What are crystal defects and why do they help create some of the most useful (semiconductors) and beautiful (gemstones) things we have? This introductory seminar is open to all students, and prior exposure to chemistry, physics, or calculus is NOT required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Patta, Y. (PI)

MATSCI 100: Undergraduate Independent Study

Independent study in materials science under supervision of a faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

MATSCI 143: Materials Structure and Characterization

Students will study the theory and application of characterization techniques used to examine the structure of materials at the nanoscale. Students will learn to classify the structure of materials such as semiconductors, ceramics, metals, and nanotubes according to the principles of crystallography. Methods used widely in academic and industrial research, including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, will be demonstrated along with their application to the analysis of nanostructures. Prerequisites: E-50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 153)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 144: Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies

Understand the thermodynamics and efficiency limits of modern green technologies such as carbon dioxide capture from air, fuel cells, batteries, and solar-thermal power. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 154)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 145: Kinetics of Materials Synthesis

The science of synthesis of nanometer scale materials. Examples including solution phase synthesis of nanoparticles, the vapor-liquid-solid approach to growing nanowires, formation of mesoporous materials from block-copolymer solutions, and formation of photonic crystals. Relationship of the synthesis phenomena to the materials science driving forces and kinetic mechanisms. Materials science concepts including capillarity, Gibbs free energy, phase diagrams, and driving forces. Prerequisites: MatSci 144. (Formerly 155)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Clemens, B. (PI)

MATSCI 150: Undergraduate Research

Participation in a research project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit
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