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1 - 10 of 29 results for: ITALIAN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ITALIAN 62N: Art and Healing in the Wake of Covid-19: A Health Humanities Perspective (FRENCH 62N)

How have artists contributed to healing during the Covid-19 pandemic? How does art shape or express diverse cultural understandings of health and illness, medicine and the body, death and spirituality, in response to crisis? How do such understandings directly impact the physical healing but also the life decisions and emotions of individuals, from caregivers to patients? And finally, how do these affect social transformation as part of healing?nnThis course examines the art of COVID-19, from a contemporary and historical perspective, using the tools of Health Humanities, a relatively new discipline that connects medicine to the arts and social sciences. Materials for this course include art from different media (from poetry and fiction to performance and installation), produced during COVID-19 in mostly Western contexts, in diverse communities and with some forays into the rest of the world and into other historical moments of crisis. They also include some non-fiction readings from t more »
How have artists contributed to healing during the Covid-19 pandemic? How does art shape or express diverse cultural understandings of health and illness, medicine and the body, death and spirituality, in response to crisis? How do such understandings directly impact the physical healing but also the life decisions and emotions of individuals, from caregivers to patients? And finally, how do these affect social transformation as part of healing?nnThis course examines the art of COVID-19, from a contemporary and historical perspective, using the tools of Health Humanities, a relatively new discipline that connects medicine to the arts and social sciences. Materials for this course include art from different media (from poetry and fiction to performance and installation), produced during COVID-19 in mostly Western contexts, in diverse communities and with some forays into the rest of the world and into other historical moments of crisis. They also include some non-fiction readings from the disciplines Health Humanities draws from, such as history of medicine, anthropology, psychology, sociology, cultural history, media studies, art criticism, and medicine itself. We will thus be introduced to basics of Health Humanities and its methods while addressing the pandemic as a world-changing event, aided by the unique insights of artists. The course will culminate in final projects that present a critical and contextual appreciation of a specific art project created in response to COVID-19; such appreciations may be creative art projects as well, or more analytical, scholarly evaluations.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 117: Is Horror (also) Italian?

Horror haunts our world. We associate it with manmade and natural catastrophes. But horror is also a genre. And haven't we all experienced something horrible? In this class, we take up the task of understanding what horror means, why it fascinates us, and to what extent it belongs to our lives. Our laboratory is perhaps an unexpected one: Italy. In the popular imagination, Italy is the land of fashion and Vespas, sunshine and romance: this class reveals its darker side. After finding the roots of Italian horror in Dante and Boccaccio's descriptions of Hell and the plague, we will then focus on horror in more recent Italian literature, comics, and cinema - covering supernatural sources, such as a haunted dance school, and horrifyingly real ones, such as the concentration camp. Centering on the Italian twentieth and twenty-first century, this class introduces students to a genre which is also, at the same time, an experience - and vice versa. Participants will reflect on questions such a more »
Horror haunts our world. We associate it with manmade and natural catastrophes. But horror is also a genre. And haven't we all experienced something horrible? In this class, we take up the task of understanding what horror means, why it fascinates us, and to what extent it belongs to our lives. Our laboratory is perhaps an unexpected one: Italy. In the popular imagination, Italy is the land of fashion and Vespas, sunshine and romance: this class reveals its darker side. After finding the roots of Italian horror in Dante and Boccaccio's descriptions of Hell and the plague, we will then focus on horror in more recent Italian literature, comics, and cinema - covering supernatural sources, such as a haunted dance school, and horrifyingly real ones, such as the concentration camp. Centering on the Italian twentieth and twenty-first century, this class introduces students to a genre which is also, at the same time, an experience - and vice versa. Participants will reflect on questions such as: why and how do we represent horror? Is there anything philosophical about horror, and can we learn anything from it? Does horror presuppose gore or monsters, or specifically belong to certain canons and motifs? Are we all equally exposed to horror or can it be, for instance, a gendered experience? Taught in English. Readings available both in Italian and in translation. Authors include Dante, Boccaccio, Giacomo Leopardi, Curzio Malaparte, Primo Levi, Dario Argento, Giorgio de Maria, Elena Ferrante.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Capra, A. (PI)

ITALIAN 127: Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca

This course examines the origins of Italian literature in the late Middle Ages, with a particular focus on love. Course topics include human and divine love, beauty, and the role of the eyes in gazing and contemplation. We will read selections from Dante's "Vita Nuova" and "Divina Commedia;" Petrarca's "Canzoniere;" and Boccaccio's "Decameron."Taught in Italian. Recommended: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent level of proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 129: Truth or Consequences: Introduction to Modern Italian Literature and Culture

This course serves as an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture, while at the same time allowing students to further improve their understanding of Italian language. The guiding theme of our journey will be the Fantastic, a niche and often overlooked genre in the canon. Is the Fantastic a mere escape from reality and grim historical contingencies? Does it, perhaps, tell us more truth that it seems to concede? Through this notion, we will seek to analyze the different social, political, and cultural dynamics that have shaped Italy's history since its unification. Starting from Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio, we will see how different authors have used fantastic tales as a way to transgress literary and linguistic boundaries. From the Futurism of Aldo Palazzeschi and Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, moving through Massimo Bontempelli and Alberto Savinio's Surrealism, to the weird tales of Tommaso Landolfi and Dino Buzzati and the metaphysical works of Anna Maria Ortese and Italo Calvino, students will become more familiar with the literary canon and specific aspects of Italian history and culture. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be in Italian.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Dule, G. (PI)

ITALIAN 140: Great Minds of the Italian Renaissance and their World (ARTHIST 210, HISTORY 240C, ITALIAN 240)

What enabled Leonardo da Vinci to excel in over a dozen fields from painting to engineering and to anticipate flight four hundred years before the first aircraft took off? How did Michelangelo paint the Sistine Chapel Ceiling? What forces and insights led Machiavelli to write "The Prince"? An historical moment and a cultural era, the Italian Renaissance famously saw monumental achievements in literature, art, and architecture, influential developments in science and technology, and the flourishing of multi-talented individuals who contributed profoundly, expertly, and simultaneously to very different fields. In this course on the great thinkers, writers, and achievers of the Italian Renaissance, we will study these "universal geniuses" and their world. Investigating the writings, thought, and lives of such figures as Leonardo da Vinci, Niccolò Machiavelli, and Galileo Galilei, we will interrogate historical and contemporary ideas concerning genius, creativity, and the phenomenon of "Renaissance man" known as polymathy. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ITALIAN 154: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

What makes you the individual you are? Should you plan your life, or make it up as you go along? Is it always good to remember your past? Is it always good to know the truth? When does a machine become a person? What do we owe to other people? Is there always a right way to act? How can we live in a highly imperfect world? And what can film do that other media can't? We'll think about all of these great questions with the help of films that are philosophically stimulating, stylistically intriguing, and, for the most part, gripping to watch: Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Dark Knight (Nolan), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman), Arrival (Villeneuve), My Dinner with André (Malle), Blade Runner (Scott), La Jetée (Marker), Fight Club (Fincher), No Country for Old Men (Coen), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), and Memento (Nolan). Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory; and fun.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 186: The Art of Self-Portraits (COMPLIT 186A, FEMGEN 186, FRENCH 186)

What is a self-portrait? The simple answer is that it is a portrait of the self. The complex answer is: anything that a person finds relevant to one's identity. Sometimes self-portraits are built around a positive idea, sometimes around a sense of loss; sometimes they are constructed as a shield or as a weapon, and turn into a manifesto of the self; sometimes they include a physical representation, sometimes they deny legitimacy to the body; sometimes gender or race (or both) are at the core of the identity, sometimes they are hidden; they are, however, never neutral and are always meaningful. In this class we will learn how to disentangle these multiple layers and will work on deconstructing them: we will focus on how each facet shapes and determines the representation and will appreciate the tactics and strategies used by the artists and authors in our syllabus (Frida Kahlo, Pablo Picasso, Simone de Beauvoir, Jin Min Lee, Alison Bechdel, Jhumpa Lahiri, among others). The class is taught in English and will have creative as well as critical assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 188: Women, Wheat, and Weather? Lessons from Italy and the Global South for the 21st Century (COMPLIT 188A, COMPLIT 288, FRENCH 188, FRENCH 288, ITALIAN 288)

The Global South - a symbolic Mediterranean stretching from the Caribbean to India - lures the civilized man with the promise of excellent weather, voluptuous women, and good food. Already in antiquity, Sicily, the southernmost province of what is today modern Italy, was known as "the granary of Rome," supplying the Empire with wheat. Still today, the South is associated with vacation, underdevelopment, superstition, the mafia, la dolce vita: "The South is the problem; the North the solution," Boaventura de Sousa Santos succinctly puts it. In this course, we will move beyond the three W's by focusing on Italy from the point of view of "Southern Thought" ("pensiero meridiano"). We will read 20th/21st-century literary, philosophical, anthropological, and sociological texts from the Global South (Franco Cassano, Roberto M. Dainotto, Salman Rushdie, Gayatri Spivak, de Sousa Santos, Frantz Fanon, Homi Bhabha, Achille Mbembe, Carla Lonzi) to discuss such relevant topics as community and belo more »
The Global South - a symbolic Mediterranean stretching from the Caribbean to India - lures the civilized man with the promise of excellent weather, voluptuous women, and good food. Already in antiquity, Sicily, the southernmost province of what is today modern Italy, was known as "the granary of Rome," supplying the Empire with wheat. Still today, the South is associated with vacation, underdevelopment, superstition, the mafia, la dolce vita: "The South is the problem; the North the solution," Boaventura de Sousa Santos succinctly puts it. In this course, we will move beyond the three W's by focusing on Italy from the point of view of "Southern Thought" ("pensiero meridiano"). We will read 20th/21st-century literary, philosophical, anthropological, and sociological texts from the Global South (Franco Cassano, Roberto M. Dainotto, Salman Rushdie, Gayatri Spivak, de Sousa Santos, Frantz Fanon, Homi Bhabha, Achille Mbembe, Carla Lonzi) to discuss such relevant topics as community and belonging (Elena Ferrante), technology and globalization (Luigi Pirandello; Fernando Pessoa), virus and contagion (Albert Camus), as well as race and gender (Igiaba Scego) from a Southern critical perspective. What counterhegemonic, non-binary, and renewable alternatives do the south of Italy and the Global South in general offer to understand these issues, and to the Western and Northern European emphasis on reason (the Cartesian "cogito"), individualism, and objectivity? We will have guest speakers from the Council of the EU and USAID specialized in international development, as well as conversations with authors. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ilievska, A. (PI)

ITALIAN 189: Writing About Italy

Writing about various topics in Italian Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, or cultural and literary history, medieval to modern, in Italy. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Florence. Fulfills the WIM requirement for Italian majors.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5
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