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1 - 10 of 20 results for: ITALIAN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ITALIAN 127: Spectacles of Love, Spectacles of Horror: Introduction to Medieval Italian Literature

This course is both an introduction to medieval Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. Our voyage through medieval Italian literature will explore the interconnected realms of Eros and Death, of Love and Horror: how to reconcile religiosity and the viscerally carnal images of this period's poetry? Why is the heart object of adoration and, at the same time, of cannibalistic cravings? We will begin our journey in the XIII century with religious poetry and the Sicilian School, to then move and dwell in the Florence of Cavalcanti, Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. Florence will be the main stage for our Spectacles of Love and Horror: a city at once cradle of Dolce Stil Novo and of bloody political fights, almost completely annihilated by the 'Black Death' in the XIV century. The protagonists of our story will be some of the most extraordinary works of Italian Literature, such as Saint Francis' Cantico delle creature, Dante's Commedia, Petrarch's Canzoniere, Boccaccio's Decameron. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent level of proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Capra, A. (PI)

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 129: Modern Italian Culture

This course examines the fate of Italian culture since 1800. We will study major examples of Italian literature, art, and cinema from the modern period in relation to their historical context. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Biffanti, D. (PI)

ITALIAN 142: The Good Life: Renaissance Perspectives on Perennial Questions

What constitutes a good life? What conditions and relationships enable one to live well, and what attitudes and activities, systems and structures bring them about or make them possible? Renaissance men and women asked such questions, turning to study of the classical past and to close observation of their contemporary world in search of satisfying answers. This course will explore their reflections and investigations, experimentations and creations, examining seminal conceptions and ideals of the Renaissance through their expression in text and image. Topics will include beauty and love; virtue and honor; excellence and exceptionalism; freedom and justice; power and authority; leadership and governance; wealth and prosperity; work and service; education and religion; health and medicine; family, friendship and community. Focusing on Italian contexts with reference to broader European and global trends, discussion and analysis will center on discrepancies between the real and the ideal in Renaissance society and culture. Taught in English. NOTE: New Italian Studies Assistant Professor Sarah Prodan will teach this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ITALIAN 155: The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Holliday, J. (PI)

ITALIAN 199: Individual Work

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 200: Italian Modernities: Lecture Series and Course (ITALIAN 300)

Over the course of the whole year, we will invite 6 speakers to present work on modern Italian culture and literature; these sessions will be supplemented by seminar meetings in which we discuss the work of our guests and prepare writing projects that relate to them. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 233: When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo (HISTORY 235D, HISTORY 335D, ITALIAN 333)

In 1633, the Italian mathematician Galileo was tried and condemned for advocating that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the cosmos. The Catholic Church did not formally admit that Galileo was right until 1992. Examines the many factors that led to the trial of Galileo and looks at multiple perspectives on this signal event in the history of science and religion. Considers the nature and definition of intellectual heresy in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and examines the writings of Galileo's infamous predecessor Giordano Bruno (burned at the stake in 1600). Looks closely at documents surrounding the trial and related literature on Renaissance and Reformation Italy in order to understand the perspectives of various participants in this famous event. Focal point of seminar involves the examination of the many different histories that can be produced from Galileo's trial. What, in the end, were the crimes of Galileo?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)
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