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1 - 10 of 48 results for: INTLPOL ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

INTLPOL 200: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (CS 22A)

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems are free of algorithmic bias and respect human ethical principles? What role will they play in our system of justice and the practice of law? How will they be used or abused in democratic societies and autocratic regimes? Will they alter the geopolitical balance of power, and change the nature of warfare? The goal of CS22a is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

INTLPOL 204A: Microeconomics for Policy (PUBLPOL 51, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Bulow, J. (PI)

INTLPOL 204B: Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers (PUBLPOL 301B)

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5

INTLPOL 207B: Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications (PSYCH 216, PUBLPOL 305B)

Theories, insights, and concerns of social psychology relevant to how people perceive issues, events, and each other, and links between beliefs and individual and collective behavior will be discussed with reference to a range of public policy issues including education, public health, income and wealth inequalities, and climate change, Specific topics include: situationist and subjectivist traditions of applied and theoretical social psychology; social comparison, dissonance, and attribution theories; stereotyping and stereotype threat, and sources of intergroup conflict and misunderstanding; challenges to universality assumptions regarding human motivation, emotion, and perception of self and others; also the general problem of producing individual and collective changes in norms and behavior.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Ross, L. (PI)

INTLPOL 209A: IPS Master's Thesis

(Formerly IPS 209A) For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis adviser required. Total of eight units required for any student completing an approved thesis. This course is only available to students who were granted permission to complete the thesis prior to Summer Quarter 2018-19.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-8 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

INTLPOL 213: International Mediation and Civil Wars

(Formerly IPS 213) This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh). In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

INTLPOL 214: Refugees in the Twenty-first Century

(Formerly IPS 214) The focus of this graduate seminar is policy dilemmas in international responses to massive population movements. In 2015 and 2016 hundreds of thousands of persons from the Middle East (particularly Syria) and Africa fled their home countries and attempted to cross into Europe by sea. In September 2016, the United Nations General Assembly unanimously adopted the "New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants". This political declaration aims to improve the international response to large movements of refugees and migrants, including protracted refugee situations. One of the many challenges confronting this multilateral diplomatic undertaking is that the definition of the word "refugee" is contested, as is the process to determine who is a refugee. This course will provide an immersive examination of the causes and consequences of refugee movements. This course is a seminar that requires full student attendance and participation. A focus of the course is to develop the skills of students in writing policy memos. Students will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions on their policy memos.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Morris, E. (PI)

INTLPOL 221: Politics of Data: Algorithmic Culture, Big Data, and Information Waste

(Formerly IPS 221) This course examines the role of data and algorithms in politically significant phenomena such as fake news,Twitter bots, prediction markets, racial profiling, autonomous robotic weapons, cryptocurrencies, and hacked elections. Readings are drawn from science & technology studies, information science, anthropology, communication, media studies, legal theory, sociology, and computer science, with additional contributions from psychology and philosophy. Non-technical, but minimal familiarity with computers and data analysis is assumed. Assignments include reading logs, a midterm exam, and a term paper. NOTE: Undergraduate enrollment is limited to seniors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

INTLPOL 224: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (ECON 124)

(Formerly IPS 224) This course explores East Asia's rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, such as, political economy, human capital, inequality, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisites: INTPOL 301B, Polisci150A(355A), Econ 102B or equivalent courses that cover regression analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Lee, Y. (PI)

INTLPOL 230: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
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