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1 - 10 of 12 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HUMRTS 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W, HISTORY 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HUMRTS 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HISTORY 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMRTS 101: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice

In this survey human rights course, students will learn about the principal historical and philosophical bases for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international legal frameworks meant to protect and promote these rights. Class sessions will include a mix of seminar discussions and guest lectures by distinguished Stanford faculty from departments across the university as well as practitioners from a variety of professional fields. The course seeks to illuminate for how the distinct methodologies, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. This course fulfills the gateway course requirement for the minor in Human Rights.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 103: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTLPOL 280, INTNLREL 180A)

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 104: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104, FEMGEN 94H, SOC 186)

One in every five Americans has some kind of disability according to the Census Bureau, making this group the largest minority in America. Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. Disability is an elusive, complex and fluid concept that encompasses a range of bodily, cognitive and sensory differences and abilities. It is produced as much by environmental and social factors as it is by bodily functions and pathology. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability i more »
One in every five Americans has some kind of disability according to the Census Bureau, making this group the largest minority in America. Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. Disability is an elusive, complex and fluid concept that encompasses a range of bodily, cognitive and sensory differences and abilities. It is produced as much by environmental and social factors as it is by bodily functions and pathology. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, anti-discrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorfman, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 106: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116)

This course examines core human rights issues and concepts from a comparative and historical perspective. In the beginning part of the course we will focus on current debates about the universality of human rights norms, considering the foundation of the international human rights regime and claims that it is a product of western colonialism, imperialism, or hegemony. We will then discuss a series of issues where the debates about universality are particularly acute: gender inequality and discrimination, sexual violence, child marriage and forced marriage more generally, and other related topics. We will also consider the way in which issues of gender-based violence arise in the context of internal and international conflicts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 107: Understanding the Impact of New Technologies on Human Rights Investigations and Transitional Justice

This is a required course for students participating in the BOSP faculty-initiated program overseas trip to Colombia. Enrollment preference for HUMRTS 107 will be given to students enrolled or waitlisted for participation in the corresponding OSPGEN summer trip to Colombia, however, students who cannot participate in the travel portion are welcome to take HUMRTS 107, as well. This course will offer students insights into the philosophical underpinnings of the field of transitional justice coupled with a practical lens through which to study different ways governments and human rights institutions pursue justice, broadly defined, in the wake of mass atrocities or systemic repression. Students will closely examine a number of jurisdictions contemplating or currently undergoing a transitional justice process ¿ including Colombia, South Sudan, Syria, Libya, Cambodia, Burma/Myanmar, Tunisia, the Central African Republic, El Salvador, and Iraq ¿ with an eye towards understanding the changi more »
This is a required course for students participating in the BOSP faculty-initiated program overseas trip to Colombia. Enrollment preference for HUMRTS 107 will be given to students enrolled or waitlisted for participation in the corresponding OSPGEN summer trip to Colombia, however, students who cannot participate in the travel portion are welcome to take HUMRTS 107, as well. This course will offer students insights into the philosophical underpinnings of the field of transitional justice coupled with a practical lens through which to study different ways governments and human rights institutions pursue justice, broadly defined, in the wake of mass atrocities or systemic repression. Students will closely examine a number of jurisdictions contemplating or currently undergoing a transitional justice process ¿ including Colombia, South Sudan, Syria, Libya, Cambodia, Burma/Myanmar, Tunisia, the Central African Republic, El Salvador, and Iraq ¿ with an eye towards understanding the changing nature of human rights investigations and prosecutions. In particular, we will consider how advances in technology have altered the possibilities for international criminal tribunals and justice mechanisms as well as the potential for innovative new mechanisms ¿ like the UN General Assembly-created International, Impartial, and Independent Mechanism for Syria (iiiM) ¿ to change the field of international justice. Students will contribute to an ongoing transitional justice process by way of a final project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMRTS 108: Spanish Immersion Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the U.S. Mexico Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL: Spanish Immersion and Asylum Law. Students who opt into HUMRTS 108 will have the opportunity to apply their advanced language skills and knowledge from the class as volunteers with the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project in Dilley, TX for one week immediately following the academic term. Students will work directly with detained Spanish-speaking families seeking asylum to prepare them for the credible fear interview (CFI). CARA will train students to conduct CFI orientations for asylum-seekers and provide guidance on how to prepare them for their interview.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brates, V. (PI)

HUMRTS 109: Slavery, human trafficking, and the moral order: ancient and modern (CLASSICS 118, CLASSICS 218)

Slavery and trafficking in persons in the Greco-Roman world were legal and ubiquitous; today slavery is illegal in most states and regarded as a grave violation of human rights and as a crime against humanity under international law. In recent trends, human trafficking has been re-conceptualized as a form of "modern day slavery. " Despite more than a century since the success of the abolition movement, slavery and trafficking continue in the 21st century on a global scale.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMRTS 112: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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