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1 - 10 of 12 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HUMRTS 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W, HISTORY 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HUMRTS 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HISTORY 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HUMRTS 101: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice

In this survey human rights course, students will learn about the principal historical and philosophical bases for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international legal frameworks meant to protect and promote these rights. Class sessions will include a mix of seminar discussions and guest lectures by distinguished Stanford faculty from departments across the university as well as practitioners from a variety of professional fields. The course seeks to illuminate for how the distinct methodologies, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. This course fulfills the gateway course requirement for the minor in Human Rights.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 103: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTLPOL 280, INTNLREL 180A)

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 108: Spanish Immersion Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the U.S. Mexico Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL: Spanish Immersion and Asylum Law. Students who opt into HUMRTS 108 will have the opportunity to apply their advanced Spanish language skills and knowledge from the class as volunteers with the Dilley Bro Bono Project in Dilley, Texas for one week immediately following the academic term. Students will work directly with detained Spanish-speaking families seeking asylum to prepare them for the credible fear interview (CFI). The Dilley Pro Bono Project will train students to conduct CFI orientations for asylum-seekers and provide guidance on how to prepare them for their interview. This course requires an application process. Please email instructor Vivian Brates vbrates@stanford.edu to get a link to the appropriate web form. Students participating in the weekly meeting during the academic term but not traveling to Texas should enroll for one unit. Students traveling in addition to the academic term meetings should enroll for 3 units. Please note that this course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER
Instructors: Brates, V. (PI)

HUMRTS 109: Slavery, human trafficking, and the moral order: ancient and modern (CLASSICS 118, CLASSICS 218)

Slavery and trafficking in persons in the Greco-Roman world were legal and ubiquitous; today slavery is illegal in most states and regarded as a grave violation of human rights and as a crime against humanity under international law. In recent trends, human trafficking has been re-conceptualized as a form of "modern day slavery. " Despite more than a century since the success of the abolition movement, slavery and trafficking continue in the 21st century on a global scale. The only book for the course is: Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, Cambridge University Press
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 110: Global Women's Issues in Human Rights and Health

This course provides an overview of international women's human rights issues presented in the context of a woman's life, beginning in infancy and childhood and moving through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. The approach to women's human rights is broad, taking into account economic and social factors and particularly the importance of women's capacities to manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Attention will be given to critical issues, such as: discrimination against women; poverty; unequal access to the cash economy, education, food, and health care; and violence. Issues such as maternal mortality, sexually transmitted diseases, violence in the home and in conflict and refugee situations, unequal access to economic opportunity, and sex trafficking will be discussed, with particular emphasis on promising interventions relating to the issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Murray, A. (PI)

HUMRTS 112: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMRTS 114: Human Rights Practice and Challenges in Southeast Asia: Issues, fieldwork, career paths

This course aims to address student interest in the practice of human rights both from the individual perspective, particularly regarding a variety of professional career paths, as well as from institutional perspectives. Courses that focus on particular human rights issues or on the broad international legal framework of human rights are core components of a human rights curriculum. This course, on the other hand, is regionally focused, practice-oriented, and addresses the ways in which human rights initiatives and projects are designed, developed, funded, implemented, and evaluated by the various actors and institutions that make up the complex landscape of human rights work. We will have several guest speakers who have successfully followed different career paths in the UN, NGOs, academia, philanthropy, and development. They also reflect engagement in a number of key areas of human rights practice: gender based violence and gender discrimination; statelessness; freedom of religion a more »
This course aims to address student interest in the practice of human rights both from the individual perspective, particularly regarding a variety of professional career paths, as well as from institutional perspectives. Courses that focus on particular human rights issues or on the broad international legal framework of human rights are core components of a human rights curriculum. This course, on the other hand, is regionally focused, practice-oriented, and addresses the ways in which human rights initiatives and projects are designed, developed, funded, implemented, and evaluated by the various actors and institutions that make up the complex landscape of human rights work. We will have several guest speakers who have successfully followed different career paths in the UN, NGOs, academia, philanthropy, and development. They also reflect engagement in a number of key areas of human rights practice: gender based violence and gender discrimination; statelessness; freedom of religion and expression in an electronic age; justice sector reform and the rule of law; business and human rights; prosecution and accountability for war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity.nnnThe requirements for an effective practice-oriented course dictate that it be of limited geographical scope while at the same time having a regional, and to a lesser extent, a cross-regional perspective. Accordingly, the focus of this course will be on the 10 Southeast Asian nations that make up ASEAN as a region with its own legal and institutional human rights framework. We will also consider some of the ways in which ASEAN human rights issues are connected to its neighbors and, in this case, particularly to South Asia (Rohingya) and China (human trafficking and environmental issues). nnnThe course will be structured around the following 5 main segments:nn(1) Issues: Overview of human rights challenges in ASEAN: What are the most pressing issues (and to whom); how is the human rights agenda defined at the national and regional levels; how are priorities established; what are the obstacles to effective implementation of the agenda? nn(2) Players: The roles of national and regional institutions; national NGOs and human rights activists; national human rights commissions; governmental and regional bodies; international human rights organizations; the UN and its various engaged institutions (UNDP, UNODC, UNHCHR, UNHCR, Special Mandates, Human Rights Committee, etc.); national development agencies and embassies.nn(3) Initiatives and Projects: How are broad national and ASEAN human initiatives developed? How do they come to be incorporated into specific projects (research, training and capacity building, awareness raising and education, accountability, etc.)? How are such projects developed and by whom? How are they awarded, funded and implemented? What is the role of human rights philanthropy? How are such initiatives and projects evaluated? What determines the success or failure of such projects and according to whom? nn(4) Seeking accountability for human rights abuses: case studies on trafficking; gender based violence and discrimination; ethnic, religious, or political conflict and violence. nn(5) Human rights careers at the national, regional, and international levels.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 197: Human Rights Careers Intensive

This weekly seminar aimed at juniors, seniors, and graduate students, to support practical exploration of human rights careers. Students will meet alumni and other human rights professionals working in a variety of sectors, and get job-search ready. Each week, a guest speaker will present their unique story to the group, helping you connect your skills and undergraduate experiences at Stanford to long-term, meaningful human rights work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)
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