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1 - 10 of 49 results for: GSBGEN ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

GSBGEN 208: Ethics in Management

With leadership comes responsibility. This course explores the numerous ethical duties faced by managers and organizations. It combines analytical frameworks with the latest findings on human behavior to inform a wide range of ethical decisions and strategies. Readings include case studies, insights from experimental psychology and economics, and excerpts from or about major works of moral philosophy. Through online and in-class exercises, discussions, and personal reflection, you will reveal and assess your ethical intuitions, compare them with more explicit modes of ethical thought, and learn how to use ethics in business settings. A diverse set of ethical viewpoints will be considered with an emphasis on not only their implications for ethical behavior but also on the social and cognitive pitfalls that undermine the ability of business leaders to fulfill their ethical duties.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

GSBGEN 305: Investing for Good

Investing for Good will introduce students to the entire spectrum of purposeful, values-driven, and impact investing. We examine the field from the perspective of an institutional investor (i.e. fund manager, investment advisor, endowment manager, head of a family office, etc). Our goal is to have students emerge with a practical and analytical framework for: 1. evaluating impact and mission-aligned investments across multiple asset classes and sectors; 2. constructing a portfolio using impact as a lens; 3. designing an impact investment company; and 4. understanding the many practical and theoretical challenges confronting this exciting emerging field.We start by exploring some fundamental questions: what is a purposeful or impact investment; can impact investments be defined along a spectrum between conventional investing and philanthropy; whose money is it; what are the constraints and opportunities; how do we (re)define return and/or performance. We briefly analyze impact investing more »
Investing for Good will introduce students to the entire spectrum of purposeful, values-driven, and impact investing. We examine the field from the perspective of an institutional investor (i.e. fund manager, investment advisor, endowment manager, head of a family office, etc). Our goal is to have students emerge with a practical and analytical framework for: 1. evaluating impact and mission-aligned investments across multiple asset classes and sectors; 2. constructing a portfolio using impact as a lens; 3. designing an impact investment company; and 4. understanding the many practical and theoretical challenges confronting this exciting emerging field.We start by exploring some fundamental questions: what is a purposeful or impact investment; can impact investments be defined along a spectrum between conventional investing and philanthropy; whose money is it; what are the constraints and opportunities; how do we (re)define return and/or performance. We briefly analyze impact investing in the context of modern portfolio theory. We then develop a framework for portfolio construction and evaluation across four criteria: risk, return, liquidity, and impact. Through a combination of class dialogues, role plays, and case discussions, we will explore a wide variety of asset classes, impact themes, and investment challenges. A series of team-based investment committee simulations will comprise a significant portion of the course and will provide a significant experiential learning experience.Previous experience in finance, investing, social enterprise, entrepreneurship, or philanthropy is not required, but both helpful and welcomed. While first year students are encouraged to enroll, students who have limited familiarity with the basics of investing and corporate finance are strongly encouraged to purchase David Swensen's "Pioneering Portfolio Management" and cover the recommended chapters in advance of the course. It's is also important to note that this class will require financial modeling and detailed investment analysis.Many of the issues we'll be tackling have no unambiguous answers. Lively discussion and debate will be necessary and expected.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

GSBGEN 306: Real Estate Investment

The major objective of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the fundamentals of real estate investment. The course covers land economics, market analysis, finance, taxation, investment analysis, investment vehicles, real estate risk, development and urban design. Major land uses are discussed including apartments, retail, office, and industrial. The course is designed for students with limited or no background in real estate.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GSBGEN 310: The Impact of AI on Productivity and Personal Performance

Much has been written about how jobs in firms are likely to change as a result of AI. The first objective of this course is to invite guest speakers from many sectors to address how they think their own jobs or similar jobs are likely to change as AI enters the products they produce (like Netflix products) and the jobs they do. For example, the speakers could be: an engineer in a software firm; a partner in a law firm; a headquarters employee in a big retail firm; or the founder of a new business. The second objective is to bring data to bear on the topic. We ask first, is AI a new technological revolution ¿ like the past revolutions that introduced the steam engine or electrification ¿ that will produce a sustained increase in GDP and productivity? We ask next, when AI or robotics have been introduced in the past twenty years, have these innovations been translated into improvements in individuals¿ productivity and then higher wages? Are the AI innovations in the future likely to have a similar impact? Finally, for you as a student, the goals of this course are to give you a foundation for thinking about the broad consequences of the increasing use of AI, but also to think about how your work life is likely to be different from those who are working today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Shaw, K. (PI)

GSBGEN 312: I'm Just a Bill

This is a class on how public policy gets made at the highest levels of the federal government. In the first part of the quarter, lectures and discussions lead in to classrom simulations, in which students role-play as advisors to a U.S. president. You will learn how to analyze policy problems and design solutions, taking into account the multi-dimensional aspects of making federal policy and the many constraints upon those decisions.The second part of the class is a multi-week role-playing legislative simulation. Students will role-play as Members of the House of Representatives and Senate, or as senior advisors to a president. You will participate in legislative debate, voting, offering amendments, and extensive policy and legislative negotiation, with the goal of enacting a new law.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings.This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. In the final team presentation, your challenge is to craft an oral presentation that will persuade your audience to accept your strategic recommendations. By doing this, you will see why ideas, data and advocacy are combined for a professional, persuasive presentation. This practical course helps students develop confide more »
Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings.This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. In the final team presentation, your challenge is to craft an oral presentation that will persuade your audience to accept your strategic recommendations. By doing this, you will see why ideas, data and advocacy are combined for a professional, persuasive presentation. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important new feature of this course is that a team of external communications coaches work in concert with the professor to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback.In this course you will learn to:- Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational level- Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents- Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style - Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences - Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aidsStudents at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course. Waitlists have been long for this course, and you're encouraged to keep that in mind as you make your course selections. Waitlisted students are encouraged to attend the first two classes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 319: Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing

The course will be structured around the perspective of a foundation or a high net worth individual who has decided to devote substantial resources to philanthropy and wishes to decide which philanthropic goals to pursue and how best to achieve them. Although there are no formal prerequisites for the course, we will assume that students have experience working at a foundation, nonprofit organization, impact investing fund, or similar organization, or have taken an introductory course in strategic philanthropy such as GSBGEN 381. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's course, Problem Solving for Social Change ( GSBGEN 367) , which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 333: Technology Licensing

Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company's core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 50 more »
Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company's core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 500 companies. Because licenses are complex legal agreements with important legal consequences, it is tempting for business executives to delegate to lawyers the negotiation of the non-economic terms of their companies' technology license agreements. The problem with such an approach, however, is that so-called "non-economic" terms can have significant and occasionally mortal economic and business consequences. While no business person should grapple with such issues in the context of a large or complex license agreement without legal counsel, it is critical that the business person understand the consequences, negotiating levers and trade-offs themselves, for at their core, the decisions to be made on these issues are business decisions, not legal ones. This course is organized around two hypothetical companies seeking to negotiate a technology license agreement. Both parties operate under a common set of "public" facts, and each responds as well to "private" facts relevant to various business priorities and issues. Students are divided into three-person teams, each representing one or the other of the hypothetical companies, and collaborate over multiple sessions to develop a strategic business approach and then to negotiate a licensing agreement. Lectures are focused on the business, and to a lesser extent, legal issues arising in complex licensing arrangements, and are designed to give students the context and perspective they need to participate effectively in licensing strategy development and negotiation. By immersing teams of business students in a multi-session licensing negotiation, it is the objective of this course to enable them to better understand and think critically about the principal issues that arise in the conceptualization and negotiation of technology license agreements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Abramson, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 334: Family Business

Believe it or not, the "Silicon Valley model" has little or nothing to do with most businesses. Most businesses are not started by MBAs; most startups are not funded by VCs; most employees don't work for tech firms; and most businesses don't sell out to other businesses or go public. Rather, the vast majority of businesses world-wide are started, funded, and owned by families, and these firms create most of the employment in the global economy. Despite the prominence of family firms, teaching and research have traditionally focused on analyzing the widely-held or Silicon Valley model of the firm. This course explores the challenges and opportunities faced by family businesses. It is taught by Leo Linbeck III, Lecturer since 2005 at the GSB and President and CEO of Aquinas Companies, LLC. This course is an outlier in a world obsessed with tech startups and venture capital; it is a "Minority Report" from the heart of Silicon Valley. The course is intended for four main audiences: (1) Stu more »
Believe it or not, the "Silicon Valley model" has little or nothing to do with most businesses. Most businesses are not started by MBAs; most startups are not funded by VCs; most employees don't work for tech firms; and most businesses don't sell out to other businesses or go public. Rather, the vast majority of businesses world-wide are started, funded, and owned by families, and these firms create most of the employment in the global economy. Despite the prominence of family firms, teaching and research have traditionally focused on analyzing the widely-held or Silicon Valley model of the firm. This course explores the challenges and opportunities faced by family businesses. It is taught by Leo Linbeck III, Lecturer since 2005 at the GSB and President and CEO of Aquinas Companies, LLC. This course is an outlier in a world obsessed with tech startups and venture capital; it is a "Minority Report" from the heart of Silicon Valley. The course is intended for four main audiences: (1) Students whose family owns a business. (2) Students who are considering working for a family firm. (3) Students who are interested in acquiring or consulting with a private firm either directly (search funds, management consultants, etc) or indirectly (private equity, etc). (4) Students who are sick of only learning about cool, sexy startups and the geniuses who get rich from them. The course uses a combination of case studies, guest speakers, lectures, movies, and student presentations to explore the central ideas of the course, which are likely to appear irrelevant to everyone (save the instructor).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Linbeck, L. (PI)

GSBGEN 336: Energy Markets and Policy

This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatorymechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The courseuses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the roleof electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules(including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the businessstrategy of market participants¿and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.The goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-onunderstanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical tomarket functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1)regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragein input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability andincentive to exercise unilateral market power, 5) unilate more »
This is a course on how energy and environmental markets work, and the regulatorymechanisms that have been and can be used to achieve desired policy goals. The courseuses a electricity market game as a central teaching tool. In the game, students play the roleof electricity generators and retailers in order to gain an understanding of how market rules(including environmental regulations and renewable energy mandates) affect the businessstrategy of market participants¿and in turn economic and environmental outcomes.The goal of the course is to provide students with both theoretical and hands-onunderstanding of important energy and environmental market concepts that are critical tomarket functioning but not always widely appreciated. Concepts covered include: 1)regulated price-setting versus price-setting through market mechanisms, 2) BTU arbitragein input energy choices, 3) uniform price vs. pay-as-bid auctions, 4) the ability andincentive to exercise unilateral market power, 5) unilateral versus cooordinated exercise ofmarket power, 6) transmission congestion, 7) forward contracts and their effect on marketfunctioning, 8) dynamic pricing of electricity and active involvement of final demand, 9)the nature of energy reserves, 10) carbon pricing mechanisms including taxes and cap-andtradesystems, 11) renewable portfolio standards and other renewable energy incentives,12) determination of levelized cost of energy (LCOE) and its impact on new capacityinvestment decisions, and 13) interactions between environmental mechanisms andregulations. We will also discuss the key features of the markets for major sources ofenergy such as oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, solar, wind, and biomass.The course is useful background for private sector roles in energy production,research, management, trading, investment, and government and regulatory affairs;government positions in policymaking and regulation; research and policy functions inacademia, think tanks, or consultancies; and non-profit advocacy roles related to energy and the environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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