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1 - 10 of 12 results for: GLOBAL ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

GLOBAL 101: Critical Issues in Global Affairs

It is often stated that we live in a global age. What does this mean? How new is this phenomenon? What does it mean to think about the human experience from a global perspective? And, why does it matter? In this course, we will examine globalism and globalization in historical and contemporary contexts; engage with theoretical frameworks and a range of case studies from a variety of national/regional contexts; and use these to analyze global economic, political, environmental, and socio-cultural networks, trends, and issues, exploring the interconnectedness of the local and the global. We will consider how universal is the human experience and how the answer to this question might impact the future of humanity. (This is the gateway course for students wishing to pursue a Global Studies minor in one of six specializations: African, European, Islamic, Iranian, Latin American, and South Asian studies.)
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

GLOBAL 102: The Mamluks: Slave-Soldiers and Sultans of Medieval Egypt (GLOBAL 210, HISTORY 249, HISTORY 349A)

Known as ghulam or mamluk in Arabic, the slave-soldier was a ubiquitous phenomenon in the world of medieval Islam. Usually pagan steppe nomads, mamluks were purchased in adolescence, converted to Islam, taught Arabic, and trained to lead armies. Sometimes manumitted and sometimes not, in either case mamluks rose to positions of privilege and prominence in numerous regimes in the medieval Middle East.nnNowhere was the mamluk institution so fundamental as it was in Egypt between 1250 and 1517 CE, when Cairo was ruled by these slave-soldiers, their ranks constantly renewed by imports of new mamluks from the Black Sea and Caucuses. Born in the age of the crusades and ultimately conquered by the Ottoman Empire, the Mamluk Sultanate can be understood as a bridge between the worlds of medieval and early modern Islam, as well as between East and West, sitting astride the major Nile-Red Sea route that linked the Mediterranean world to that of the Indian Ocean and beyond. This class will investigate the rise and fall of the Mamluk Sultanate in Egypt and its key roles in the commercial, diplomatic, and political history both of the medieval Middle East and the wider world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 104: Iranian Cuisine

Course offers an introductory look at Iranian cooking and cuisine. Through weekly themes and the preparation of dishes, students will learn about the history of Iranian cuisine, essential ingredients, and general cooking techniques. Guest chefs will lead cooking sessions. Class begins the second week of the quarter and meets for 8 consecutive weeks. Participation in this course requires access to a kitchen.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Milani, A. (PI)

GLOBAL 135: Around the World in Ten Films (FILMSTUD 135, FILMSTUD 335)

This is an introductory-level course about the cinema as a global language. We will undertake a comparative study of select historical and contemporary aspects of international cinema, and explore a range of themes pertaining to the social, cultural, and political diversity of the world. A cross-regional thematic emphasis and inter-textual methods of narrative and aesthetic analysis, will ground our discussion of films from Italy, Japan, United States, India, China, France, Brazil, Nigeria, Russia, Iran, Mexico, and a number of other countries. Particular emphasis will be placed on the multi-cultural character and the regional specificities of the cinema as a "universal language" and an inclusive "relational network."nnThere are no prerequisites for this class. It is open to all students; non-majors welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Levi, P. (PI)

GLOBAL 190: Peace and War in Medieval Islam: From the Arab Conquests to the Crusades (GLOBAL 232, HISTORY 218C, HISTORY 318C)

This course interrogates the theory and reality of war-making and peacemaking across the first millennium of Islamic history (c.600-c.1600 CE). We will examine major historical events (e.g. the struggle of the early community of Muslims against the pagan tribes of Arabia; Arab expansion and conquest during the seventh and eighth centuries; a sequence of civil wars, dynastic struggles, and schisms within Islam; and external invasions of the Islamic world by crusaders and steppe nomads, etc.). We will also investigate the development of major normative concepts across the Islamic tradition concerning peace and war (e.g. holy war; treaty- and truce-making; treatment of conquered enemies and prisoner; diplomacy with Muslims and non-Muslims, etc.). With respect to these concepts, we will attend especially to change over time and diversity across various sects. Mix of lecture and discussion. Readings will consist of both primary sources (in English translation) and modern scholarship. No previous experience with pre-modern or Islamic history required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 191: Undergraduate Directed Reading

Independent studies for undergraduate students under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 25 units total)

GLOBAL 199: Capstone Project: Global Studies Minor

Students completing a capstone project for the Global Studies Minor must enroll in this course for units (1-5) with their capstone advisor selected as the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit, with advisor approval. Students are expected to participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 5 units total)

GLOBAL 210: The Mamluks: Slave-Soldiers and Sultans of Medieval Egypt (GLOBAL 102, HISTORY 249, HISTORY 349A)

Known as ghulam or mamluk in Arabic, the slave-soldier was a ubiquitous phenomenon in the world of medieval Islam. Usually pagan steppe nomads, mamluks were purchased in adolescence, converted to Islam, taught Arabic, and trained to lead armies. Sometimes manumitted and sometimes not, in either case mamluks rose to positions of privilege and prominence in numerous regimes in the medieval Middle East.nnNowhere was the mamluk institution so fundamental as it was in Egypt between 1250 and 1517 CE, when Cairo was ruled by these slave-soldiers, their ranks constantly renewed by imports of new mamluks from the Black Sea and Caucuses. Born in the age of the crusades and ultimately conquered by the Ottoman Empire, the Mamluk Sultanate can be understood as a bridge between the worlds of medieval and early modern Islam, as well as between East and West, sitting astride the major Nile-Red Sea route that linked the Mediterranean world to that of the Indian Ocean and beyond. This class will investigate the rise and fall of the Mamluk Sultanate in Egypt and its key roles in the commercial, diplomatic, and political history both of the medieval Middle East and the wider world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 232: Peace and War in Medieval Islam: From the Arab Conquests to the Crusades (GLOBAL 190, HISTORY 218C, HISTORY 318C)

This course interrogates the theory and reality of war-making and peacemaking across the first millennium of Islamic history (c.600-c.1600 CE). We will examine major historical events (e.g. the struggle of the early community of Muslims against the pagan tribes of Arabia; Arab expansion and conquest during the seventh and eighth centuries; a sequence of civil wars, dynastic struggles, and schisms within Islam; and external invasions of the Islamic world by crusaders and steppe nomads, etc.). We will also investigate the development of major normative concepts across the Islamic tradition concerning peace and war (e.g. holy war; treaty- and truce-making; treatment of conquered enemies and prisoner; diplomacy with Muslims and non-Muslims, etc.). With respect to these concepts, we will attend especially to change over time and diversity across various sects. Mix of lecture and discussion. Readings will consist of both primary sources (in English translation) and modern scholarship. No previous experience with pre-modern or Islamic history required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 249A: The Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning (COMPLIT 249A)

This course will focus on the analysis of ten Iranian films with the view of placing them in discourse on the semiotics of Iranian art and culture. The course will also look at the influence of a wide array of cinematic traditions from European, American, and Asian masters on Iranian cinema. Note: To satisfy a Ways requirement, this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or 'CR' grade satisfies the Ways requirement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Beyzaie, B. (PI)
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