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1 - 10 of 36 results for: FINANCE ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

FINANCE 121: Undergraduate Finance Research and Discussion Seminar

This seminar is designed to provide some experience with research methods and topics in finance, and to assist undergraduates with career interests in financial research, whether academic or not, with preparation for those careers. The seminar meetings are weekly and discussion based, covering a range of issues and methods in financial economics. Students are expected to prepare a 30-minute research presentation once during the quarter. To be considered for enrollment in this course, students need to complete an application, found here: https://forms.gle/aLB279vF3DJUJSgAA
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)

FINANCE 201: Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

FINANCE 205: Accelerated Managerial Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.No previous background in finance is required or expected for this course. Content will be comparable to F201, but the majority of course lecture material will be delivered online, with in-class sessions devoted to applications of key concepts. This "flipped classroom" version of the course is intended for self-motivated students with an interest in applications. Prerequisite material for the course will be posted online in the fall.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Berk, J. (PI)

FINANCE 207: Corporations, Finance, and Governance in the Global Economy

As entrepreneurs, global leaders, and change agents tasked with developing transformative solutions of tomorrow, you will need certain skills and tools to interact with and navigate the complex and ever-changing financial landscape. This course focuses on the development of these skills and tools through the analysis of concise real-world financial situations around the globe. Topics include valuation of cash flows and control; the capital structure, payout policy and governance of both mature and entrepreneurial firms; restructuring and managing financial distress; the use of public markets to obtain liquidity and multiple share classes to retain control; financing and governance in venture capital and private equity; the rise of activism; and social responsibility and debates about the objectives of the firms of the present and future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Seru, A. (PI)

FINANCE 211: Corporate Finance: Applications, Techniques, and Models

This course will develop and apply the basic tools and models of corporate finance to real-world corporate decisions. This course is designed to be the second course in the standard finance sequence; that is, it is designed to be the natural follow-up to the Fall Finance course. This course will develop and extend standard tools and techniques of financial analysis, valuation, and model-building, and apply these methods to a wide range of cases. Case topics will include mergers and acquisitions, private equity, corporate governance, capital structure, agency conflicts, and corporate restructuring. For all of these applications, this course will emphasize the central importance of financial analysis, valuation, and modeling to guiding optimal decision making.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Hebert, B. (PI)

FINANCE 229: MSx: Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will consider many important financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential to most of these decisions are financial valuations, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, and capital structure choice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Zwiebel, J. (PI)

FINANCE 315: Innovating for Financial Inclusion

This MBA elective explores innovative ways that start-ups are expanding the financial capacities of households and small businesses. What are the financial frictions that household/business facing impactful FinTech startups are addressing? What economic and behavioral forces are governing the successes of these startups? How is the choice of funding/business model impacting growth/scaling strategies? How is the competitive landscape evolving for traditional banks, established tech platforms, and FinTech startups? While the center of attention will be on disruption of financial services within the US legal and regulatory environments, we will frequently highlight recent innovations in Asia, Europe, and Latin America.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Blattner, L. (PI)

FINANCE 320: Debt Markets

This course is intended for those who plan careers that may involve debt financing for their businesses or other investments, or involve trading or investing in debt instruments and their derivatives, including money-market instruments, government bonds, repurchase agreements, interest-rate swaps, corporate bonds, structured credit products, and credit derivatives. We will emphasize the institutional features of the markets, including trading, pricing, and hedging. The course includes a focus on distressed debt and restructuring. Most lectures will start with a cold-called student presentation of an un-graded short homework calculation. There will also be a series of graded homework, a take-home mid-term, and about seven graded 'pop quizzes' of 10 minutes or less.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)

FINANCE 321: Investment Management and Entrepreneurial Finance

The Investments course comprises an intensive overview of active fundamental investing in both the public and private equity markets. It is relevant for students who intend to pursue careers in private or public equity investing, as well as those who want to better understand investing from the perspective of an entrepreneur, senior executive or individual. The vast majority of sessions will feature outstanding investor guest lecturers. Previous guests included Andreas Halvorsen (Viking Global), Jim Coulter (TPG), Hadley Mullen (TSG Consumer Partners), Tim Bliss (Investment Group of Santa Barbara), Munib Islam (Third Point), Sarah Friar (Square and Nextdoor), , and Charles Phillips (Recognize), and this year's lineup will be substantially similar. Established and taught for 50 years by the legendary Professor Jack McDonald, the Investments course will be taught by John Hurley `93, founder and Chief Investment Officer of Cavalry Asset Management and Professor Steve Grenadier in Autumn 2 more »
The Investments course comprises an intensive overview of active fundamental investing in both the public and private equity markets. It is relevant for students who intend to pursue careers in private or public equity investing, as well as those who want to better understand investing from the perspective of an entrepreneur, senior executive or individual. The vast majority of sessions will feature outstanding investor guest lecturers. Previous guests included Andreas Halvorsen (Viking Global), Jim Coulter (TPG), Hadley Mullen (TSG Consumer Partners), Tim Bliss (Investment Group of Santa Barbara), Munib Islam (Third Point), Sarah Friar (Square and Nextdoor), , and Charles Phillips (Recognize), and this year's lineup will be substantially similar. Established and taught for 50 years by the legendary Professor Jack McDonald, the Investments course will be taught by John Hurley `93, founder and Chief Investment Officer of Cavalry Asset Management and Professor Steve Grenadier in Autumn 2021. The course enables students to learn a broad investing skillset and study the careers of outstanding investors. Throughout the quarter, students delve into specific topics in private equity, venture capital, hedge funds, mutual funds and principal investing. Case discussions and lecture discussions will be led by the teaching team and investors/principals who were involved.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

FINANCE 333: Financial Restructuring

This course provides an intensive overview of financial restructuring transactions and processes from the perspective of distressed firms and their key stakeholders. It is intended for those who plan careers in general management, private equity, credit and special situations investing, banking, turnaround management, or financial advisory services. The course examines how companies may use in-court or out-of-court tools and processes to renegotiate their key contracts with creditors and other stakeholders when they encounter challenging business situations. Students will explore the financial, strategic, and legal implications of workouts, bankruptcies, asset/363 sales, and exchange offers, as applied in the context of financially distressed companies. Topics include valuation, absolute priority, creditor committees, intercreditor conflicts, debtor-in-possession (DIP) financings, ¿blocking¿ strategies, avoidance powers, contingent claims, tax considerations, international insolvency, more »
This course provides an intensive overview of financial restructuring transactions and processes from the perspective of distressed firms and their key stakeholders. It is intended for those who plan careers in general management, private equity, credit and special situations investing, banking, turnaround management, or financial advisory services. The course examines how companies may use in-court or out-of-court tools and processes to renegotiate their key contracts with creditors and other stakeholders when they encounter challenging business situations. Students will explore the financial, strategic, and legal implications of workouts, bankruptcies, asset/363 sales, and exchange offers, as applied in the context of financially distressed companies. Topics include valuation, absolute priority, creditor committees, intercreditor conflicts, debtor-in-possession (DIP) financings, ¿blocking¿ strategies, avoidance powers, contingent claims, tax considerations, international insolvency, and distressed investment strategy. In exploring these topics, the course focuses on the key legal and contractual rights that creditors and other counterparties possess, and how they may use these rights to optimize their negotiated outcomes in a restructuring. Students will gain the tools to identify distress before it occurs, analyze distressed companies, and design restructuring plans which create enterprise value while navigating various considerations. They will also gain an understand of how to structure financial obligations upon origination in a way to lower the probability of financial distress. Finally, the course will examine the purpose of bankruptcy design and future policy implications. The course is lecture-focused in the beginning, but will become more interactive and case-focused later in the course as students acquire the skills they need to tackle key issues. Grading will be based upon class participation (50%), and a paper due at the end of the quarter (50%). For the paper, each student will select a distressed company currently in the market and design a restructuring plan for it.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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