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1 - 10 of 29 results for: ENVRES ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENVRES 199: Independent study (ENVRES 299)

Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

ENVRES 220: The Social Ocean: Human Dimensions of Coastal and Marine Ecosystems

This interdisciplinary seminar examines human dimensions of current ocean issues through a series of readings, discussions, and guest lecturer presentations. Through the lenses offered by multiple disciplines and fields, we will examine and reinterpret the challenges of fisheries management, climate change, conservation/restoration, and human rights. We will welcome specialists in industry, academia, law, and the nonprofit sector to discuss theories of change for ocean issues, with a particular emphasis on marine justice. We invite students to create and share their own ¿Social Ocean Project¿ synthesizing course themes and personal reflections.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

ENVRES 221: New Frontiers and Opportunities in Sustainability

Interdisciplinary exploration of how companies, government and non-profit organizations address some of the world's most significant environmental & resource sustainability challenges. Each week we will explore with an experienced sustainability practitioner new frontiers and opportunities in clean tech, policy, energy, transportation, consumer goods, agriculture, food, and sustainable built environments..
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

ENVRES 222: Climate Law and Policy

This course offers an interdisciplinary, graduate-level survey of historical and current efforts to regulate emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States. Students will read primary legal documents, including statutes, regulations, and court cases in order to evaluate the forces and institutions shaping American climate policy. Although the class will focus on the intersection of climate policy and the legal system, no specific background in law is necessary. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either written assignments and an exam. Cross-listed with LAW 2520.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ENVRES 223: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (EARTHSYS 194, PWR 194EP)

This course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others. Prerequisite: PWR 2
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times. Enrollment by department consent only. Contact instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

ENVRES 226: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require massive capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change, as changes in the supply and costs of renewable and fossil energy resources alike transform the U.S. energy sector. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and comp more »
Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require massive capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change, as changes in the supply and costs of renewable and fossil energy resources alike transform the U.S. energy sector. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders all deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods¿most recently in a series of transformative proposals to use federal emergency powers to provide financial bailouts to legacy fossil and nuclear power plants. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with LAW 2503.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ENVRES 231: Qualitative Interviewing (EDUC 450C)

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI)

ENVRES 240: Environmental Decision-Making and Risk Perception

Mobilizing successful conservation efforts to mitigate climate change and preserve both local and global ecosystems requires a new way of thinking. This course will investigate the barriers to pro-environmental behavior and the heuristics and biases that cloud our ability to respond effectively to environmental problems, using insights from behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, and environmental risk perception. Emphasis on interdisciplinary applications of recent research, and implications for environmental policymaking and persuasive messaging.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

ENVRES 250: Environmental Governance (EARTHSYS 254)

How do we work together to solve environmental problems? Across the globe, who has a voice, and who ultimately decides how to balance conservation and development? How do we build governance institutions that facilitate both environmental sustainability and social equity? This seminar on environmental governance will focus on the challenges and opportunities for managing common-pool resources, like fisheries, forests, and water. Because managing environmental resources is often about managing people, we will explore the motivations underlying human behavior towards the environment. We will discuss how institutions encode our cultural values and beliefs, and how we can reshape these institutions to achieve more sustainable outcomes. Coursework includes foundational readings and a pragmatic exploration of case studies. Teaching cases address topics in community-based conservation, international protected areas, market-based approaches, coping with environmental risk, and other themes. Interested undergraduate and graduate students from any discipline are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Diver, S. (PI)
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