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1 - 10 of 113 results for: ECON ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ECON 1: Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond. In Spring 2019-2020 Econ 1 will use all class time for team-based learning instead of lectures; class attendance will be mandatory, and enrollment will be limited to 120 students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ECON 1V: Principles of Economics

The course covers all of economics at a basic level. It stresses the key idea that economics is about making purposeful choice with limited resources and about people interacting with other people as they make these choices. Most of those interactions occur in markets, and the course is mainly about markets, including labor markets and capital markets. We show why free competitive markets can improve people¿s lives and how they have removed millions from people from poverty, with many more, we hope, to come; we show how monopolies and environmental spillovers cause market failures; we show how to remedy these failures through government policy; and we explain why government failure can also be a problem. The overall goal is to use economics to understand the big issues of the day including economic growth, inequality, crises, and unemployment. The goal of this course is to learn how to use economic analysis to reach reasoned conclusions about the big issues of the day from the workings and benefits of a market economy to the causes of economic growth, financial crises, and unemployment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ECON 5: Frontiers in Economic Research and Policy

Interested in exploring how economics is used in professional, policy, and research settings? This course will feature weekly presentations from Stanford faculty and scholars and economists in government, non-profit, and business to demonstrate how economic analysis can be applied to a wide range of practical and policy problems. May be repeated for credit. Pre-requisites: none.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Makler, C. (PI)

ECON 10: Microcosm of Silicon Valley and Wall Street

Seminar in applied economics with focus on the microcosm of Silicon Valley, how growth companies are originated, managed and financed from start-up to IPO. Round-table discussion format. Applicable to those students with an interest in technology company formation, growth and finance including interaction with Wall Street. Enrollment limited to 10 juniors, seniors and co-term students. Application found at https://economics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Shanahan, T. (PI)

ECON 11N: Understanding the Welfare System

Welfare-reform legislation passed by the federal government in the mid-1990s heralded a dramatic step in the movement that has been termed the devolution revolution, which is again being discussed in the context of healthcare reform. The centerpiece of devolution is the transfer of more responsibilities for antipoverty programs to the states. We will explore the effects of these reforms and the role that devolution plays in the ongoing debates over the designs of programs that make up America's social safety net. In addition to discussing conventional welfare programs (e.g., Medicaid, food stamps, TANF, SSI) and other governmental policies assisting low-income families (EITC, minimum wages), we will examine the trends in governmental spending on anti-poverty programs and how our nation defines poverty and eligibility for income support. We will apply economics principles throughout to understand the effectiveness of America's antipoverty programs and their consequences on the behavior and circumstances of families. Prerequisites: A basic understanding/knowledge of introductory economics is recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: MaCurdy, T. (PI)

ECON 14: Navigating Financial Crises in the Modern Global Economy (PUBLPOL 14)

What causes financial crises? What are the keys to anticipating, preventing, and managing disruptions in the global financial system? This course prepares students to navigate future episodes as policymakers, finance professionals, and citizens by going inside the practical decisions made in an unfolding crisis, from the U.S. government and IMF to the boardroom and trading floor. Students will learn warning signs of distress; market structures that govern crisis dynamics; strategic interactions among the key actors; and lessons learned for creating a more resilient system. Concepts will be applied to real-world experiences in emerging market crises, the U.S. housing and global financial crisis, and the European sovereign crisis, as well as prospective risks from China's financial system and unwinding of extraordinary central bank stimulus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Toloui, R. (PI)

ECON 17N: Energy, the Environment, and the Economy

Examines the intimate relationship between environmental quality and the production and consumption of energy. Assesses the economics efficiency and political economy implications of a number of current topics in energy and environmental economics. Topics include: the economic theory of exhaustible resources, Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) control (cap and trade mechanisms and carbon fees), GHG emissions offsets, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), the "smart" transmission grid for electricity, nuclear energy and nuclear waste, the real cost of renewable energy, natural gas and coal-fired electricity production, the global coal and natural gas markets, Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency (CAFE) and Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS), Energy Efficiency Investments and Demand Response, and Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). For all topics, there will be reading to explain the economics and engineering behind the topic and class discussion to clarify and elaborate on this interaction. Prerequisite: Econ 1 is recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolak, F. (PI)

ECON 22N: Causes and Consequences of the Rise in Inequality

In this class we will discuss the economic and institutional causes of the rise in inequality in the US and other countries over the last 40 years. We will also discuss the consequences of inequality in terms of social justice, economic welfare, aggregate economic performance, intergenerational mobility, and the possible implications of inequality for the recent global financial crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 23N: Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy

We will explore the evolution and current performance of capitalist and socialist economies, their interaction with democracy, and the contemporary debate about the appropriate roles of individual vs. collective rights and responsibilities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Boskin, M. (PI)

ECON 25N: Public Policy and Personal Finance (PUBLPOL 55N)

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)
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