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1 - 10 of 114 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CSRE 1A: My Journey: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

CSRE 1T: The Public Life of Science and Technology (STS 1)

The course focuses on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments. The STS interdisciplinary lens helps students develop and apply skills in three areas: (a) Historical analysis of contemporary global affairs (e.g., spread of technologies; responses to climate change); (b) Bioethical reasoning around health issues (e.g., disease management; privacy rights); and (c) The sociological study of knowledge (e.g., intellectual property, science publishing). A discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

CSRE 1V: A History of Race

This course will survey the idea of race and its history. We will focus our attention on the construction of the idea of race, and we will trace the ways in which this concept has changed over time. The course will start with a panel discussion on definitions of race in history, and as presented in different academic disciplines today. This discussion will be followed by two lectures tracing histories of race from Antiquity until the twentieth century. The last session will be a roundtable on the continuing role of race in the United States today. Covered topics will include explicit and implicit bias, institutionalized racism, race and criminal justice, equal justice initiatives and protests, racial stratification. The roles of politics, economics, science, religion, and nationalism, as well as the relationships between race, gender, and class will also be discussed. Course must be taken for 3 units to count toward WAYS requirement. This course will meet 5 times, starting MONDAY January 14th, and ending the last day of class Monday, February 25th.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)

CSRE 3P: America: Unequal (PUBLPOL 113, SOC 3)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Grusky, D. (PI)

CSRE 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 10SC: Inequality and Poverty in the United States (SOC 11SC)

Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. This class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United Sta more »
Social inequality is a feature of all advanced industrial societies. However, some societies have more inequality than others, and some types of inequality are more prominent in some societies than in others. Inequality in the United States is greater than in many other industrialized nations and has increased dramatically in the past forty years. Economic inequality, for example, is greater today than any time since the 1920s. Growing public awareness of this inequality has sparked a vigorous debate among politicians and public protests in city streets; some that have turned violent. The Occupy Movement was driven largely by resentment against the growing concentration of economic privilege within a small segment of society. Inequality was a prominent theme in the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. Despite these debates and protests, there is no consensus about whether anything should be done to stem this trend. This class will focus on three domains of inequality in the United States: social class, gender, and racial inequality. The assigned reading and discussions will examine theories and research about the origins of social inequality; how inequality and poverty is reproduced over time; the consequences of inequality and poverty; and what might be done to reduce inequality and poverty in American society. Students will be expected to help lead and participate in class discussions, and to complete a weekly assignment based on the readings. nnIn addition to the in-class instruction, students will have an opportunity to engage in public service activities directly related to poverty and inequality. Students will work with the Director of Community Engaged Learning (DCEL) from the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity who will assist with their participation in activities connected with social service agencies in the area, including agencies that deal with homelessness, food insecurity, and other needs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

CSRE 11AX: Public Art Practice: Site-Specific Mural Installation in San Francisco

This class is an immersive hands-on introduction to contemporary public art practices, with a focus on production and installation. Field trips to galleries, artists studios, public art sites and fabricators are included and will introduce students to the work of Julie Chang, a San Francisco based contemporary artist. Student will work with Chang to create a permanent interior mural at the Willie Woo Woo Wong Playground in the heart of San Francisco¿s Chinatown. In partnership with the San Francisco Arts Commission Public Arts Program, the artwork will be context and site-specific and span two levels across 850 feet. Students with interests in painting, visual art, design and arts administration will gain a multifaceted look into the process of site-specific public art practice.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

CSRE 11SI: Leadership at Stanford

This class will explore the role of student government, decision-making and advocacy in a major research university setting such as Stanford. Designed to prepare new student leaders for their legislative responsibilities, the class will incorporate presentations from university stakeholders along with experiential learning exercises and individual class projects. Topics of study include understanding the role and responsibilities of student government in a university setting, institutional change, decision-making, advocacy and conflict resolution. Students will also study ASSU governing documents, effective funding and event planning processes and roles. They will gain awareness of how to understand and engage with a complex and decentralized organization such as Stanford while honing their leadership skills. They will develop a project they wish to pursue as an elected leader and receive mentorship from university administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Howe, N. (PI)

CSRE 16A: Dynamic Australia: immigrant and indigenous experiences

How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several more focused questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? As a course project, students will informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration in history - as articul more »
How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several more focused questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? As a course project, students will informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration in history - as articulated at the level of individuals and communities. This course is primarily intended for students enrolled in or waitlisted for the BOSP Summer Seminar in Sydney (June-July 2019), and as such focuses on historical and social milieux. However, all participants will find it a wide-ranging introduction to Australian society and a case study in intergroup dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CSRE 21N: How to Make a Racist (AFRICAAM 121N, PSYCH 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)
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