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1 - 10 of 99 results for: CLASSICS ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CLASSICS 1G: Beginning Greek

No knowledge of Greek is assumed. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

CLASSICS 1L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 1.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. No previous knowledge of Latin is assumed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language
Instructors: Bark, B. (PI)

CLASSICS 2G: Beginning Greek

Continuation of CLASSICS 1G. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Dubit, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 2L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 2.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 1L or equivalent placement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Bark, B. (PI)

CLASSICS 3G: Beginning Greek

Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 2G or equivalent placement. CLASSICS 3G fulfills University language requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language

CLASSICS 3L: Beginning Latin

Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 2L or equivalent placement. CLASSICS 3L fulfills the University language requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language
Instructors: Shi, P. (PI)

CLASSICS 6G: Biblical Greek (JEWISHST 5, RELIGST 171A)

This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Melzer, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 9N: What Didn't Make It into the Bible (JEWISHST 4, RELIGST 4)

Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. "What Didn't Make It in the Bible" focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed f more »
Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. "What Didn't Make It in the Bible" focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring books, groups, and ideas that eventually lost the battles of history and to keep asking the question "why." In critically examining these ancient narratives and the communities that wrote them, you will investigate how religions canonize a scriptural tradition, better appreciate the diversity of early Judaism and Christianity, understand the historical context of these religions, and explore the politics behind what did and did not make it into the bible.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 11G: Intermediate Greek: Prose

Transition to reading Greek prose. Students will build upon knowledge of morphology and syntax acquired in beginning Greek to develop confidence and proficiency in reading a variety of Greek texts from mythology to selections of classical and biblical prose.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Stephens, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 11L: Intermediate Latin: Introduction to Literature

Phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Readings in prose and poetry. Analysis of literary language, including rhythm, meter, word order, narrative, and figures of speech.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Tennant, J. (PI)
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