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1 - 10 of 43 results for: CHINA ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CHINA 10SC: The Cult of Happiness: Pursuing the Good Life in America and China (COMPLIT 10SC)

The 2006 film Pursuit of Happyness, an unabashed celebration of the American Dream, was enthusiastically embraced by Chinese audiences. It seems that the pursuit of happiness has become truly globalized, even as the American Dream is slipping away for many. Are Americans still convinced that their conception of happiness is a self-evident truth and a universal gospel? Is there anything that Americans might learn about what it means to live a good life from not only the distant past, but also cultures in which happiness is envisioned and sought after very differently? This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the question of happiness and invites undergraduate students to reflect on its relationship to wealth, wisdom, health, love, pleasure, virtue, justice, and solidarity. Giving equal weight to Chinese and Western sources, it seeks to defamiliarize some of the most deeply held ideas and values in American society through the lens of cross-cultural inquiry.

nnDuring the su more »
The 2006 film Pursuit of Happyness, an unabashed celebration of the American Dream, was enthusiastically embraced by Chinese audiences. It seems that the pursuit of happiness has become truly globalized, even as the American Dream is slipping away for many. Are Americans still convinced that their conception of happiness is a self-evident truth and a universal gospel? Is there anything that Americans might learn about what it means to live a good life from not only the distant past, but also cultures in which happiness is envisioned and sought after very differently? This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the question of happiness and invites undergraduate students to reflect on its relationship to wealth, wisdom, health, love, pleasure, virtue, justice, and solidarity. Giving equal weight to Chinese and Western sources, it seeks to defamiliarize some of the most deeply held ideas and values in American society through the lens of cross-cultural inquiry.

nnDuring the summer, students will read a selection of novels, memoirs, and reflections by philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. In September, we will review these texts and place them alongside movies, short fiction, news stories, and social commentary while we interrogate the chimera of happiness. In addition, we will experiment with meditation, short-form life writing (including mock-obituaries!), and service-learning.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Lee, H. (PI)

CHINA 24: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (COMPLIT 44, HUMCORE 133, JAPAN 24, KOREA 24)

Modern East Asia was almost continuously convulsed by war and revolution in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the everyday experience of modernity was structured more profoundly by the widening gulf between the country and the city, economically, politically, and culturally. This course examines literary and cinematic works from China and Japan that respond to and reflect on the city/country divide, framing it against issues of class, gender, national identity, and ethnicity. It also explores changing ideas about home/hometown, native soil, the folk, roots, migration, enlightenment, civilization, progress, modernization, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and sustainability. All materials are in English. This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

CHINA 105: Beginning Classical Chinese, First Quarter (CHINA 205)

The goal is develop students' reading knowledge of classical Chinese, including basic grammar and commonly used vocabulary. Students will also learn concepts and ideas fundamental in Chinese culture involving family, human relationships, governance, learning, life/death, philosophy, etc. through reading canonical classical Chinese texts. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 23 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Sun, C. (PI)

CHINA 106: Beginning Classical Chinese, Second Quarter (CHINA 206)

Continue to develop students' reading knowledge of classical Chinese, including basic grammar and commonly used vocabulary. Students will learn more concepts and ideas fundamental in Chinese culture involving family, human relationships, governance, learning, life/death, philosophy, etc. through reading canonical classical Chinese texts. Prerequisite: CHINA 105/205 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Sun, C. (PI)

CHINA 107: Beginning Classical Chinese, Third Quarter (CHINA 207)

Goal is reading knowledge of classical Chinese. Basic grammar and commonly used vocabulary. Students with no background in classical Chinese who are taking 127/207 to satisfy Chinese major requirements must begin with 125/205. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 126/206 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINA 111: Literature in 20th-Century China (CHINA 211)

(Graduate students register for 211.) How modern Chinese culture evolved from tradition to modernity; the century-long drive to build a modern nation state and to carry out social movements and political reforms. How the individual developed modern notions of love, affection, beauty, and moral relations with community and family. Sources include fiction and film clips. WIM course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wang, B. (PI)

CHINA 146: Political Thought in Modern Asia (CHINA 246, ETHICSOC 146, POLISCI 235N, POLISCI 335N)

The study of political theory in the United States has been accused of being Western-centric: We tend to focus on intellectual traditions from Plato to NATO, while ignoring the vast world of non-Western societies and the ways they think about politics and public life. How do Chinese thinkers conceptualize human rights and good governance? How do Indian intellectuals reconcile democracy and inherited hierarchies in Hinduism? How do Islamic scholars view the relationship between religious authority and secular authority? Should we regard liberal democracy, or Western civilization more broadly, as representing the universal value guiding every society? Or, should we learn from non-Western ideas and values so as to solve problems plaguing Western societies? How can competing visions of good life coexist in a globalized and increasingly pluralistic world? This course aims to answer these questions by exploring three Asian traditions and their perspectives on politics: Confucianism, Hinduism more »
The study of political theory in the United States has been accused of being Western-centric: We tend to focus on intellectual traditions from Plato to NATO, while ignoring the vast world of non-Western societies and the ways they think about politics and public life. How do Chinese thinkers conceptualize human rights and good governance? How do Indian intellectuals reconcile democracy and inherited hierarchies in Hinduism? How do Islamic scholars view the relationship between religious authority and secular authority? Should we regard liberal democracy, or Western civilization more broadly, as representing the universal value guiding every society? Or, should we learn from non-Western ideas and values so as to solve problems plaguing Western societies? How can competing visions of good life coexist in a globalized and increasingly pluralistic world? This course aims to answer these questions by exploring three Asian traditions and their perspectives on politics: Confucianism, Hinduism, and Islam. We will focus on the modern period (19th-21st centuries) and the ways intellectuals in these societies respond to the challenge of modernity and Western superiority. Special attention is given to how these intellectuals conceive of the relationship between modernity and their respective traditions: Are they compatible or mutually exclusive? In which ways do intellectuals interpret these traditions so as to render them (in)compatible with modernity? We will read academic articles written by Anglophone scholars as well as original texts written by non-Western thinkers. No knowledge of non-Western languages is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Jiang, D. (PI)

CHINA 151: The Use of Classical Antiquity in Modern China (CHINA 251, CLASSICS 143)

This course examines the roles played by classical antiquity--Greek, Roman, and Chinese--in China's modernization process. Central topics of discussion include: the relationship between tradition and modernity, the relationship between China and the West, the politics and techniques of appropriation in the reception of classical heritage, and the evolving and highly contentious nature of the differences among various approaches to classical antiquity. Tackling the most fundamental questions that have confronted an ancient civilization from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, the course investigates how "classics" and "classical tradition" acquire different meanings and functions in changed contexts, and serves as a convenient introduction to key moments and figures in modern Chinese cultural and intellectual history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINA 163A: Looking for the Way (Dao) in East Asia (HUMCORE 113)

This course looks at foundations of East Asian thought, including Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism as well as other cultural traditions. The ideologies were first articulated in ancient China (or India) and from there spread to Korea, Japan, and throughout Southeast Asia, where they remain important today. We will read selections from seminal texts including "The Confucian Analects", "Daode jing", "Zhuangzi", and "The Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch". Attention is also given to other perennial (and often problematic) themes of Asian life and society, including those of conflicting loyalties and violent revenge. Finally, the course examines aesthetic expression in painting and calligraphy that became the embodiment of classical philosophical values and their own articulation of an aestheticized Way, still widely practiced and admired. This course is part of the Humanities Core, a collaborative set of global humanities seminars that brings all of its students and faculty into conversation. On Mondays you meet in your own course, and on Wednesdays all the HumCore seminars (in session that quarter) meet together: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

CHINA 174: New Directions in the Study of Poetry and Literary Culture (CHINA 374)

Inquiry into new approaches and interpretations of the poetic tradition in China in the context of cultural history. Readings in recent scholarship and criticism that situate poetry in print history, manuscript culture, gender studies, social history, etc. Readings in English. Reading knowledge of Chinese desirable but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)
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