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1 - 10 of 279 results for: CEE ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 6: Physics of Cities

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32D: Construction: The Writing of Architecture

This seminar focuses on the construction of architectural writing. The class will analyze this idea through four topics: formal analysis, manifesto, translation, and preservation. The seminar is divided into two-week modules with each of these four concepts functioning as organizing principles. nnThe first week of each module will involve familiarizing the seminar with both the terms and rhetorical tactics of the given theme by reading and analyzing specific texts and completing a short written analysis (1-2 pages). The second week will expand upon this foundation and involve further analysis in addition to each student writing a short paper (3-4 pages) drawing on the examples discussed and their own experiences in the discipline. The goal of the seminar is for each student to be able to analyze how an architectural writing is constructed and to develop his/her skills in the construction of his/her own writing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32G: Architecture Since 1900 (ARTHIST 142)

Art 142 is an introduction to the history of architecture since 1900 and how it has shaped and been shaped by its cultural contexts. The class also investigates the essential relationship between built form and theory during this period.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

This seminar is a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The four course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates TBD. The meeting times are 4:30 PM -5:30 PM for the seminar and 6:30 - 7:45 for the lecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32W: Making Meaning: A Purposeful Life in Design

As designers, how do we lead a life with meaning? What is a fuulfilling life in design and how do we develop personal and professional practices that support this aim? This experiential course will explore how to nourish a purposeful life amidst a culture that can value productivity over presence in the field, identifying "busyness" as a marker of personal worth. How do we bring depth to not only the design process but our individual and collective lives as well? Investigations will include: exploring personal passions, discovering meaningful work in design, understanding work/life/play balance, practicing self-reflection, integrating wellness, cultivating community, and practicing design with integrity. Our time in class will be enjoyed sharing meals, discourse, play, and reflections with both the class cohort and designers that lead lives or purpose and meaning.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 33B: Japanese Modern Architecture

This seminar will examine Japanese architecture and theory since 1900. Through a combination of case studies, readings, and chronological overview, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the aesthetic, expression of construction, structural dynamics, material choices, and philosophical viewpoints that impact Japanese modern and contemporary architectural design. Through lectures, class discussions, a series of weekly writing assignments, and a longer paper and presentation, students will develop the tools to analyze and understand Japanese design of today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 33C: Housing Visions

This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These is more »
This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These issues will be discussed within the context the changing composition of the American population and economy. n nThis course will be primarily discussion-based, using slideshows, readings and field trips as a departure points for student-generated conversations. Each student will be asked to lead a class discussion based on his/her research topic. Students will evaluate projects, identifying which aspects of the initial housing visions were realized, which did not, and why. Eventually, students might identify factors that lead to ¿successful¿ projects, and/or formulate new approaches that can strengthen or redefine the progressive role of housing: one inclusive of the complex social, economic, and ethical dimensions of design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)
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