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1 - 10 of 29 results for: BIOHOPK ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOHOPK 47H: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introduces students to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to dynamic habitats, as well as an inquiry-based experience in how to explore complex systems in nature. This course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 119H: People and Nature of Monterey Bay (BIOHOPK 219H)

This course is an exploration of the natural and cultural history of the Monterey Bay. Its shoreline has captured the imagination of scientists and artists alike; the rich natural history has shaped a social history saturated by the sea and predicated on bountiful fisheries. Students will discover natural landscapes including intertidal rocky shores, kelp forests, coastal dunes, wetlands, the deep sea and open ocean; human landscapes will include native communities prior to European colonization, whaling and the history of marine overexploitation, agriculture, urbanization and coastal erosion. The class is organized around weekly outdoor field trips to sites around the Monterey Peninsula, student-led discussions, and writing reflections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

BIOHOPK 143H: Quantitative methods for marine ecology and conservation (BIO 143, BIO 243, BIOHOPK 243H, CEE 164H, CEE 264H, EARTHSYS 143H, EARTHSYS 243H)

NOTE: This course will be taught in-person on main campus, in hybrid format with Zoom options. The goal of this course is to learn the foundations of ecological modeling with a specific (but not exclusive) focus on marine conservation and sustainable exploitation of renewable resources. Students will be introduced to a range of methods - from basic to advanced - to characterize population structure, conduct demographic analyses, estimate extinction risk, identify temporal trends and spatial patterns, quantify the effect of environmental determinants and anthropogenic pressures on the dynamics of marine populations, describe the potential for adaptation to climate change. This course will emphasize learning by doing, and will rely heavily on practical computer laboratories, in R and/or Phyton, based on data from our own research activities or peer reviewed publications. Students with a background knowledge of statistics, programming and calculus will be most welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

BIOHOPK 157H: Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (ENGLISH 157H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. The trip provides a unique opportunity for students to directly engage with marine animals, coastal habitats and environmental concerns of Monterey Bay. As historian Jill Lepore writes of Rachel Carson: "She could not have written Silent Spring if she hadnt, for decades, scrambled down rocks, rolled up her pant legs, and waded into tide pools, thinking about how one thing can change another..." Back on campus students will complete and workshop three original nonfiction essays that explore the intersection between personal narrative and scientific curiosity. You will develop a more patient and observant eye and improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts to a general readership. **This course takes place on main campus and is open to all undergraduate students. Hopkins Marine Station Field Trip Dates: Saturday 1/22 and Sunday 1/23. NOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

BIOHOPK 159H: Ocean Forensics: Ecological, Conservation and Market Data from Environmental DNA (BIOHOPK 259H)

DNA collected from the environment - air, water, market samples, soil, substrates, etc - contains a wealth of information about the species that have been in those locations. This course is about the methods to extract DNA, manipulate it and sequence it to determine the species and populations there. It will also delve into the bioinformatic tools needed to ensure data quality, compare results to existing taxonomic data bases, test hypotheses, and visualize the results.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

BIOHOPK 166H: Historical Ecology at Hopkins Marine Station (BIO 166, BIO 266, BIOHOPK 266H)

NOTE: This course will be taught on main campus as a hybrid in-person and virtual course, with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station as the primary component.This course is an exploration of the rich intertidal flora and fauna at Hopkins Marine Station, through the lens of historical ecology and long-term change. During weeks 1-7, students will attend in-person discussions with the TA, while the instructor zooms in from Hopkins Marine Station. During week 8, students will go on a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station, the culminating experience in the course. Main campus lectures and discussions will provide an overview of historical ecology and the natural history of rocky shores. In the lab at Hopkins Marine Station, students will focus on species identification and scientific illustration. These skills will be put to use in the field, where we will quantify patterns of intertidal biodiversity. During weeks 9 and 10, students will answer a data-based question and reflect on the long- more »
NOTE: This course will be taught on main campus as a hybrid in-person and virtual course, with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station as the primary component.This course is an exploration of the rich intertidal flora and fauna at Hopkins Marine Station, through the lens of historical ecology and long-term change. During weeks 1-7, students will attend in-person discussions with the TA, while the instructor zooms in from Hopkins Marine Station. During week 8, students will go on a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station, the culminating experience in the course. Main campus lectures and discussions will provide an overview of historical ecology and the natural history of rocky shores. In the lab at Hopkins Marine Station, students will focus on species identification and scientific illustration. These skills will be put to use in the field, where we will quantify patterns of intertidal biodiversity. During weeks 9 and 10, students will answer a data-based question and reflect on the long-term data collection. Students will sign up for Fridays, 2-5pm. Open to undergraduate and graduate students (3 units). Course requires application and instructor consent. Application link: https://bit.ly/ bio166-application or go to: https://hopkinsmarinestation.stanford.edu/undergraduate-studies/majors-courses/biohopk-166h-historical-ecology
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 173H: Marine Conservation Biology (BIOHOPK 273H)

*Class can be taken in-person or via Zoom* Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course. Students who want to enroll only in the seminar and discussion course (2 units) should register for BIOHOPK 173HA. (Graduate students register for 273H.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

BIOHOPK 173HA: Marine Conservation Biology - Seminar and Discussion Only (BIOHOPK 273HA)

*Class can be taken in-person or via Zoom* Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to marine conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example, endangered species, captive breeding, reserve design, habitat fragmentation, ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Also includes emerging approaches such as ecosystem based management, ocean planning, and coupled social-ecological systems. The course will include lectures, readings and discussions of primary literature, and attendance at seminars with visiting scholars. Prerequisite: introductory biology; suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course.nStudents should enroll in this course if they are only joining the seminar and discussion. Students who will engage in the full course should enroll in BIOHOPK 173H/273H. (Graduate students register for 273HA.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

BIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

Nature is inherently variable. Statistics gives us the tools to quantify the uncertainty of our measurements and draw conclusions from data. This course is an introduction to probability, statistical analysis, and experimental design. The primary focus is on the use of general linear models (e.g., t-tests, analysis of variance, regression). Students will use R to explore and analyze datasets relevant to the life and ocean sciences. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Graduate students register for 274H.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Elahi, R. (PI)

BIOHOPK 182H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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