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1 - 10 of 56 results for: AA ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

AA 102: Introduction to Applied Aerodynamics

This course explores the fundamentals of the behavior of aerodynamic surfaces (airfoils, wings, bodies) immersed in a fluid across all speed regimes (from subsonic to supersonic/hypersonic). We will cover airfoil theory (subsonic and supersonic), wing theory, and introduction to viscous flows and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers, and the topic of flow transition. At the completion of this course, students will be able to understand and predict the forces and movements generated by aerodynamic configurations of interest. Assignments require a basic introductory knowledge of MATLAB or another suitable programming language. Prerequisites: CME 100 and CME 102 (or equivalent), PHYS 41, AA 100, and AA 101 or ME 70.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Alonso, J. (PI)

AA 109Q: Aerodynamics of Race Cars

Almost as soon as cars had been invented, races of various kinds were organized. In all its forms (open-wheel, touring car, sports car, production-car, one-make, stock car, etc.), car racing is today a very popular sport with a huge media coverage and significant commercial sponsorships. More importantly, it is a proving ground for new technologies and a battlefield for the giants of the automotive industry. While race car performance depends on elements such as engine power, chassis design, tire adhesion and of course, the driver, aerodynamics probably plays the most vital role in determining the performance and efficiency of a race car. Front and/or rear wings are visible on many of them. During this seminar, you will learn about many other critical components of a race car including diffusers and add-ons such as vortex generators and spoilers. You will also discover that due to the competitive nature of this sport and its associated short design cycles, engineering decisions about a more »
Almost as soon as cars had been invented, races of various kinds were organized. In all its forms (open-wheel, touring car, sports car, production-car, one-make, stock car, etc.), car racing is today a very popular sport with a huge media coverage and significant commercial sponsorships. More importantly, it is a proving ground for new technologies and a battlefield for the giants of the automotive industry. While race car performance depends on elements such as engine power, chassis design, tire adhesion and of course, the driver, aerodynamics probably plays the most vital role in determining the performance and efficiency of a race car. Front and/or rear wings are visible on many of them. During this seminar, you will learn about many other critical components of a race car including diffusers and add-ons such as vortex generators and spoilers. You will also discover that due to the competitive nature of this sport and its associated short design cycles, engineering decisions about a race car must rely on combined information from track, wind tunnel, and numerical computations. It is clear that airplanes fly on wings. However, when you have completed this seminar, you will be able to understand that cars fly on their tires. You will also be able to appreciate that aerodynamics is important not only for drag reduction, but also for increasing cornering speeds and lateral stability. You will be able to correlate between a race car shape and the aerodynamics effects intended for influencing performance. And if you have been a fan of the Ferrari 458 Italia, you will be able to figure out what that black moustache in the front of the car was for.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Farhat, C. (PI)

AA 115Q: The Global Positioning System: Where on Earth are We, and What Time is It?

Preference to freshmen. Why people want to know where they are: answers include cross-Pacific trips of Polynesians, missile guidance, and distraught callers. How people determine where they are: navigation technology from dead-reckoning, sextants, and satellite navigation (GPS). Hands-on experience. How GPS works; when it does not work; possibilities for improving performance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Lo, S. (PI)

AA 118N: How to Design a Space Mission: from Concept to Execution

Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to th more »
Space exploration is truly fascinating. From the space race led by governments as an outgrowth of the Cold War to the new era of space commercialization led by private companies and startups, more than 50 years have passed, characterized by great leaps forward and discoveries. We will learn how space missions are designed, from concept to execution, based on the professional experience of the lecturer and numerous examples of spacecraft, including unique hardware demonstrations by startups of the Silicon Valley. We will study the essentials of systems engineering as applicable to a variety of mission types, for communication, navigation, science, commercial, and military applications. We will explore the various elements of a space mission, including the spacecraft, ground, and launch segments with their functionalities. Special emphasis will be given to the design cycle, to understand how spacecraft are born, from the stakeholders' needs, through analysis, synthesis, all the way to their integration and validation. We will compare the current designs with those employed in the early days of the space age, and show the importance of economics in the development of spacecraft. Finally, we will brainstorm startup ideas and apply the concepts learned to a notional space mission design as a team.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: D'Amico, S. (PI)

AA 119N: 3D Printed Aerospace Structures

The demand for rapid prototyping of lightweight, complex, and low-cost structures has led the aerospace industry to leverage three-dimensional (3D) printing as a manufacturing technology. For example, the manufacture of aircraft engine components, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) wings, CubeSat parts, and satellite sub-systems have recently been realized with 3D printing and other additive manufacturing techniques. In this freshman seminar, a survey of state-of-the-art 3D printing processes will be reviewed and the process-dependent properties of 3D-printed materials and structures will be analyzed in detail. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of this manufacturing approach will be debated during class! To give students exposure to 3D printing systems in action, tours of actual 3D printing facilities on campus (Stanford's Product Realization Laboratory), as well as in Silicon Valley (e.g., Made in Space) will be conducted.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Senesky, D. (PI)

AA 131: Space Flight

This class is all about how to build a spacecraft. It is designed to introduce undergraduate engineering students to the engineering fundamentals of conceiving, designing, implementing, and operating satellites and other space systems. Topics include orbital dynamics, attitude dynamics, mission design, and subsystem technologies. The space environment and the seven classic spacecraft subsystems - propulsion, attitude control and navigation, structure, thermal, power, telemetry and command, and payload - will be explored in detail. Prerequisites: Freshman-level physics, basic calculus and differential equations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

AA 136A: Spacecraft Design (AA 236A)

Space Capstone I. Required for Aero/Astro majors. The design of unmanned spacecraft and spacecraft subsystems emphasizing identification of design drivers and current design methods. Topics: spacecraft configuration design, mechanical design, structure and thermal subsystem design, attitude control, electric power, command and telemetry, and design integration and operations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

AA 136B: Spacecraft Design Laboratory (AA 236B)

Space Capstone II. Required for Aero/Astro majors. Continuation of 236A. Emphasis is on practical application of systems engineering to the life cycle program of spacecraft design, testing, launching, and operations. Prerequisite: 236A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

AA 141: Atmospheric Flight

From people's initial dreams and theories of flight to future design problems, this class introduces students to flight in the atmosphere and the multidisciplinary challenges of aircraft design. We will discuss how new approaches to airplane propulsion, structures, autonomy, and aerodynamics can lead to environmentally sustainable future transportation, supersonic flight, and personal air vehicles. We will look at how local companies are developing autonomous aircraft, inspired by natural flyers, to systems that will provide ubiquitous internet access flying at twice the altitude of airliners. Prerequisites: MATH 20, 21 or MATH 41, 42 or equivalents; elementary physics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Kroo, I. (PI)
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