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1 - 10 of 23 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 83N: City, Space, Literature (ENGLISH 83N)

This course presents a literary tour of various cities as a way of thinking about space, representation, and the urban. Using literature and film, the course will explore these from a variety of perspectives. The focus will be thematic rather than chronological, but an attempt will also be made to trace the different ways in which cities have been represented from the late nineteenth century to recent times. Ideas of space, cosmopolitanism, and the urban will be explored through films such as The Bourne Identity and The Lunchbox, as well as in the writings of Arthur Conan Doyle, Walter Mosley, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Karen Tei Yamashita, and Mohsin Hamid, among others.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Quayson, A. (PI)

URBANST 108H: Housing Affordability Crisis in California: Causes, Impacts, and Solutions

This course will divided into three sections that when combined provide 1) the overall narrative of the precedents and adverse impacts of the worldwide, US west coast and California housing crises and the frameworks for California to create a balanced housing market without causing extreme displacement; 2) an overview of the planning, regulatory and development environments in California along with an opportunities/threats analysis to illuminate current opportunities to achieve a balanced housing market; and 3) an overview of the federal, state, regional and local housing policy environments and areas of policy work addressing and responding to the California housing crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies (HISTORY 107)

Today, for the first time in history, a majority of people live in cities. By 2050, cities will hold two-thirds of the world¿s population. This transformation touches everyone, and raises critical questions. What draws people to live in cities? How will urban growth affect the world¿s environment? Why are cities so divided by race and by class, and what can be done about it? How do cities change who we are, and how can we change cities? In this class, you will learn to see cities in new ways, from the smallest everyday interactions on a city sidewalk to the largest patterns of global migration and trade. We will use specific examples from cities around the world to illustrate the concepts that we learn in class. The course is intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 112: The Urban Underclass (CSRE 149A, SOC 149, SOC 249)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 113: Introduction to Urban Design: Contemporary Urban Design in Theory and Practice

Comparative studies in neighborhood conservation, inner city regeneration, and growth policies for metropolitan regions. Lect-disc and research focusing on case studies from North America and abroad, team urban design projects. Two Saturday class workshops in San Francisco: 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the quarter. Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

URBANST 123: Approaching Research and the Community (CSRE 146A)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 124: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 130D, ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

URBANST 125: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

URBANST 126: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (CSRE 162A, RELIGST 162X)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 126A: Ethics and Leadership in Public Service (CSRE 126C, EDUC 126A, ETHICSOC 79)

This course explores ethical questions that arise in public service work, as well as leadership theory and skills relevant to public service work. Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, assignments, and guest lectures, students will develop a foundation and vision for a future of ethical and effective service leadership. This course serves as a gateway for interested students to participate in the Haas Center's Public Service Leadership Program.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Lobo, K. (PI)
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