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1 - 10 of 19 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 123B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (CSRE 146B, CSRE 346B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 125: Shades of Green: Exploring and Expanding Environmental Justice in Practice (CSRE 125E, EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been shaped by a limited view of the environmental justice movement, often centered on urban environmental threats and separated from other types of environmental and climate advocacy. This course will seek to expand on these discussions by exploring topics such as access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, inclusion in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, the influence of colonialism on ways of knowing, food justice and ethics, and the future of climate change policy. The course will also involve a community partnership project. In small groups students will work with an environmental organization to problem-solve around issues of equity, representation, and access. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemologies and welcome undergraduates from all disciplines. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation and commitment to community partnerships. This course requires instructor approval, please submit an application by March 7th at midnight. Application available at https://forms.gle/chBoCLX3WKSA7kBF6.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Engage with founders of leading social enterprises, including Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Muhammad Yunus of Grameen Bank, Wendy Kopp of Teach for America, Paul Rice of Fair Trade USA, and Durreen Shahnaz of Impact Investment Exchange, among many others in this weekly speaker series. Students will be exposed to the perspectives and endeavors of global high-impact entrepreneurs who address social and environmental needs in the U.S. and internationally through for-profit, nonprofit and hybrid models. Each week after a live in-depth interview with a social entrepreneur via Zoom, students will have the opportunity to converse directly with each guest entrepreneur during Q&A. This class will expose students to pioneering thought leaders, diverse impact career paths, networking and potential internship and job opportunities.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 50 times (up to 50 units total)
Instructors: Edwards, M. (PI)

URBANST 140F: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (AFRICAAM 236B, COMPLIT 236A, CSRE 140S, FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336, HISTORY 245C)

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial pasts, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

URBANST 141A: Urban Schools, Social Policy, and the Gentrifying City (CSRE 291, EDUC 390)

This course is designed to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of educational inequality in the contemporary U.S. city. This course will survey existing literature about the intersection of gentrification and urban schooling, focusing on policies and practices that gave rise to the current urban condition, theory and research about urban redevelopment, collateral consequences for schools and communities, and how these issues relate to the structure and governance of urban schools as well as to the geography of opportunity more broadly.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: pearman, f. (PI)

URBANST 148A: Cities and Creativity: Cultural and Architectural Interpretations of Madrid

This class is being offered in collaboration with Stanford in Madrid, Bing Overseas Studies Program. Focused on the artistic and architectural aspects of cities, this course fosters students' creative sensibilities through six basic approaches: experiment, research, analyze, interpret, think and do. These approaches will help students understand the sociocultural dimension of the human being within the urban context, where the inherent vitality of creativity lies. The case of Madrid is used as a framework for analysis and interpretation, since it provides the extraordinary opportunity to carry out activities and online experiences charged with significance in the setting of the city. Understanding the architecture of cities as an artistic result of society in each historic period helps to assess their formative capacity and their sociocultural impact. The aim is to analyze and interpret the cultural and educational mission of the city, using theoretical supports and researching relevant urban and architectural places of Madrid, seeing the city as a whole organism that for centuries has gone through an uninterrupted modernization process, as an outcome of society´s creativity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

URBANST 150: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, HISTORY 252E)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 163: Land Use: Planning for Equitable and Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 168, PUBLPOL 163)

Approximately 80% of Americans live in urban areas (Source: Statista, 2019) and that percentage is growing. Take a moment to wonder what makes a city, why did it develop that way, and is that a good thing? Why are homes located in a specific area and businesses or factories located in another? How did someone decide where the roads would go, how much park or open space is available to play in and can you easily walk to a bus or train to get to your destination? Did cities develop fairly, equitably, and in a sustainable manner? Answering these questions begins with an exploration of land use, a seemingly technical term that refers to the relationship between humans and the built environment. While ¿land use¿ may not be part of your daily vernacular, everyone has experienced the power of its impact. nn nnThe goal of land use planning is to maximize the health, safety, and economic well-being of residents in ways that reflect the unique needs, desires, and culture of those who live and wo more »
Approximately 80% of Americans live in urban areas (Source: Statista, 2019) and that percentage is growing. Take a moment to wonder what makes a city, why did it develop that way, and is that a good thing? Why are homes located in a specific area and businesses or factories located in another? How did someone decide where the roads would go, how much park or open space is available to play in and can you easily walk to a bus or train to get to your destination? Did cities develop fairly, equitably, and in a sustainable manner? Answering these questions begins with an exploration of land use, a seemingly technical term that refers to the relationship between humans and the built environment. While ¿land use¿ may not be part of your daily vernacular, everyone has experienced the power of its impact. nn nnThe goal of land use planning is to maximize the health, safety, and economic well-being of residents in ways that reflect the unique needs, desires, and culture of those who live and work within the community. However, recent events have highlighted growing inequalities in American society. How have government decisions related to land use, growth, and development contributed to these growing inequalities, and can new approaches make society better? nn nnThis is an introductory course that will review the history and trends of land use policies, as well as address a number of current themes to demonstrate the power and importance of land use. Students will explore how urban areas function, how stakeholders influence land use choices, and how land use decisions contribute to positive and negative outcomes. nn nnThrough case studies, guest speakers, selective readings and interactive assignments, this survey course seeks to demystify the concept of land use for the non-city planner. By exploring the contemporary history of land use in the United States, students will learn how land use has been used as a tool for discriminatory redlining and NIMBYism. Students will learn about current land use planning efforts that seek to make cities more resilient and equitable to address issues like gentrification, environmental justice, and affordable housing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

URBANST 169: Race and Ethnicity in Urban California (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, CSRE 260)

The course is part of an ongoing research project that examines the consequences of longterm social, economic, and political changes in ethnic and race relations in in urban California. The required readings, discussions, and service learning component all provide a platform for students to explore important issues, past and present, affecting California municipalities undergoing rapid demographic transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

URBANST 179: The Social Life of Neighborhoods (AFRICAAM 76B, CSRE 176B, SOC 176, SOC 276)

How do neighborhoods come to be? How and why do they change? What is the role of power, money, race, immigration, segregation, culture, government, and other forces? In this course, students will interrogate these questions using literatures from sociology, geography, and political science, along with archival, observational, interview, and cartographic (GIS) methods. Students will work in small groups to create content (e.g., images, audio, and video) for a self-guided ¿neighborhood tour,¿ which will be added to a mobile app and/or website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Stuart, F. (PI)
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