2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 20 results for: URBANST

URBANST 27Q: The Detective and the City

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1880s and 90s, San Francisco in the 1920s and 30s, and contemporary Shanghai) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring three great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade, and Qiu Xiaolong's Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives or on one of today's related manifestations of the same impulse in mass-market tales of superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

URBANST 109: Physics of Cities (CEE 6)

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

URBANST 111A: The Politics of the American City

This course will focus on American urban politics ¿- the distinctive nature of local government, its relationship to state government and the separation of powers between states and the federal government. Certain theories about political decision-making and power sharing will be explored. We will try to develop a national perspective on the political dynamics of urban governments and we will probe certain policy areas such as economic development to understand how political choice is embedded within the allocation of resources to meet human needs. The growing transformation among American urban areas due to the rise of the global economy will also be examined. The course will be composed of lectures, class discussions and graded exercises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

URBANST 123B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (CSRE 146B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 126A: Ethics and Leadership in Public Service (CSRE 126C, EDUC 126A, ETHICSOC 79)

This course explores ethical questions that arise in public service work, as well as leadership theory and skills relevant to public service work. Through readings, discussions, in-class activities, assignments, and guest lectures, students will develop a foundation and vision for a future of ethical and effective service leadership. Offered through the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Lobo, K. (PI)

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Invited lecture series. Perspectives and endeavors of entrepreneurs and thought leaders who address social needs in the U.S. and internationally through private, for-profit and nonprofit organizations or public institutions. The lecture and Q&A is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., followed by an optional discussion period with the speaker including dinner.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Edwards, M. (PI)

URBANST 140F: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (AFRICAAM 236B, COMPLIT 236A, CSRE 140S, FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336, HISTORY 245C)

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial pasts, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

URBANST 141: Gentrification (AFRICAAM 241A, CSRE 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 169: California's Minority-Majority Cities (AFRICAAM 169A, AMSTUD 169, CSRE 260)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints