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1 - 10 of 64 results for: SOC ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (CSRE 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 31N: Social Networks

This Introductory Seminar reviews the history of social network studies, investigates how networks have changed over the past hundred years and asks how new technologies will impact them. We will draw from scholarly publications, popular culture and personal experience as ways to approach this central aspect of the human experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 105: The Sociology of Emotions

Although most of us think that feelings are deeply personal and private experiences, this seminar explores the social side of emotion¿including how they are socially learned, shaped, regulated, and distributed in the population as well as the consequences of emotion culture, emotion norms, emotional labor, and emotional deviance for individuals and society. We will consider specific emotions ¿ including jealousy, fear, sympathy, and happiness ¿ as well as more general patterns ¿ including the commercialization of emotion and the role of emotions in politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Johnston, E. (PI)

SOC 105VP: Contested markets in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest (EARTHSYS 205VP, SOC 205VP)

Strategies of environmental movements to contain domestic and foreign corporations that are viewed as major perpetrators of rainforest devastation and the socio-economic degradation of this vast region. Topics: Origins, roles and inter-relations among corporations (zero deforestation agreements in soybean agriculture and cattle ranching), the development of environmental law and the efficacy of government and NGO movements¿ strategies, and whether this emerging economy shapes social classes, groups, tribes, family life to further embed inequality and immobility
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 111: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shin, G. (PI)

SOC 112: Comparative Democratic Development (POLISCI 147)

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on global third wave of democratization beginning in the mid-1970s, the recent global recession of democracy (including the rise of illiberal populist parties and movements), and the contemporary challenges and prospects for democratic change.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 120VP: Poverty and Inequality in Israel (CSRE 120P, JEWISHST 131VP)

Poverty rates in Israel are high and have been relatively stable in recent decades, with about one fifth of all households (and a third of all children) living below the poverty line. In this class we will learn about poverty and inequality in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries.nnIn the first few weeks of this class we will review basic theories of poverty and inequality and we will discuss how theories regarding poverty have changed over the years, from the "culture of poverty" to theories of welfare state regimes. We will also learn about various ways of measuring poverty, material hardship, and inequality, and we will review the methods and data used.nnIn the remaining weeks of the class we will turn to substantive topics such as gender, immigration, ethnicity/nationality, welfare policy, age, and health. Within each topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US. Examination of these issues will introduce students to some of the challenges that Israeli society faces today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 135: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States (SOC 235)

Over the last three decades, inequality in America has increased substantially. Why has this happened, and what can be done about it? The course will begin by surveying the basic features of poverty, inequality, and economic mobility in the 21st century. From here we will discuss issues related to discrimination, education and schools, criminal justice, and the changing nature of the family as forces that shape inequality. We will also focus on the main social policy options for addressing inequality in the United States, including income support for the poor, taxing higher incomes, efforts to encourage philanthropy, and other institutional reforms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: King, M. (PI)
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