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1 - 10 of 56 results for: SOC ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SOC 8: Sport, Competition, and Society

This course uses the tools of social science to help understand debates and puzzles from contemporary sports, and in doing so shows how sports and other contests provide many telling examples of enduring social dynamics and larger social trends. We also consider how sport serves as the entry point for many larger debates about the morality and ethics raised by ongoing social change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freese, J. (PI)

SOC 112: Comparative Democratic Development (POLISCI 147)

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on global third wave of democratization beginning in the mid-1970s, the recent global recession of democracy (including the rise of illiberal populist parties and movements), and the contemporary challenges and prospects for democratic change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

SOC 118: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 218)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Boch, A. (PI)

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 142: Sociology of Gender (FEMGEN 142, FEMGEN 242, SOC 242)

Male, female, woman, man, feminine, masculine. We all know what gender is, right? In this course, we will critically examine the idea of gender from a sociological perspective. For the first few weeks, we will tackle the big question 'What is gender?' To do this, we will begin by interrogating taken-for-granted ideas about the biological underpinnings of gender. We then dive into sociological conceptions of gender. In the latter portion of the course we will examine the ways gender operates and produces inequality within a variety of societal institutions, including the media, the family, the workplace, and the legal system. This class will expose you to some of the methods social scientists use to study gender and help you think critically about common sense understandings of gender through a look at both popular journalism and rigorous academic research. The emphasis of this class is to leave you with a long-lasting understanding of why the study of social problems, and especially those related to gender, matter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gleit, R. (PI)

SOC 145: Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA (CSRE 145, SOC 245)

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 146: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Al-Saber, S. (PI)

SOC 155: The Changing American Family (FEMGEN 155, FEMGEN 255, SOC 255)

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 160: Formal Organizations (SOC 260)

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Furuta, J. (PI)

SOC 174: Social Computing (CS 278, SOC 274)

Today we interact with our friends and enemies, our team partners and romantic partners, and our organizations and societies, all through computational systems. How do we design these social computing systems to be effective and responsible? This course covers design patterns for social computing systems and the foundational ideas that underpin them. Students will engage in the creation of new computationally-mediated social environments. Course available for 3-4 units; students enrolling in the 4-unit option will conduct deeper engagement with the topic via additional readings and discussions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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