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1 - 10 of 15 results for: SLAVIC ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SLAVIC 36: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 36X)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as revolution, tradition, and hell have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like immigration, universal basic income, and youth play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these ¿dangerous¿ ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Anderson, R. (PI)

SLAVIC 148: Slavic Literature and Culture since the Death of Stalin (REES 348, SLAVIC 348)

The course offers a survey of Soviet and post-Soviet literary texts and films created by Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian artists and marginalized or repressed by the Soviet regime. The first part of the course will focus on the topics of opposition and dissent, generational conflict, modernization, Soviet everyday life, gender, citizenship and national identity, state-published and samizdat literature, "village" and "cosmopolitan" culture, etc. The second part of it will be devoted to the postmodernist aesthetics and ideology in the dismantlement of totalitarian society, as well in the process of shaping post-Soviet identities. The reading materials range from the fictional, poetic, and publicistic works written by Noble-prize (Solzhenitsyn, Brodsky, Alexievich) and other major writers of the period to the drama, film, and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)

SLAVIC 155: St. Petersburg: Imagining a City, Building a City (URBANST 156)

St. Petersburg, the world's most beautiful city, was designed to display an 18th-century autocrat's power and to foster ties between Russia and the West - on the tsar's terms. It went through devastating floods and a deadly siege; it birthed the "Petersburg myth," poems and prose that explore the force of the state and the individual's ability to resist. This class addresses the struggle between the authorities and the inhabitants; the treacherous natural environment; the city as a node in national and international networks of communication; the development of urban transportation networks; and the supply of goods. NOTE: This course is required of students attending the overseas seminar to St. Petersburg in September 2018.Class times to be determined upon the availability of all enrolled students. Please contact instructor(s) via email if you have any questions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

SLAVIC 156: Vladimir Nabokov: Displacement and the Liberated Eye (COMPLIT 115, COMPLIT 315, SLAVIC 356)

How did the triumphant author of "the great American novel" Lolita evolve from the young author writing at white heat for the tiny sad Russian emigration in Berlin? We will read his short stories and the novels The Luzhin Defense, Invitation to a Beheading, Lolita, Lolita the film, and Pale Fire, to see how Nabokov generated his sinister-playful forms as a buoyant answer to the "hypermodern" visual and film culture of pre-WWII Berlin, and then to America's all-pervading postwar "normalcy" in his pathological comic masterpieces Lolita and Pale Fire. Buy texts in translation at the Bookstore; Slavic grad students will supplement with reading and extra sessions in original Russian.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

SLAVIC 195: Russian and East European Theater (SLAVIC 395)

Evolution of modernist Russian/Eur. dramaturgy, theatrical practices, landmark productions from Chekhov-Meyerhold-Grotowski to present; re-performance of classics; techniques of embodiment. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

SLAVIC 197: Readings in Yiddish Literature 2 (SLAVIC 397)

Yiddish literature, at a second-year language level. Continuation of SLAVIC 196. Readings chosen based on student interest; contact instructor with questions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

SLAVIC 199: Individual Work for Undergraduates

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

SLAVIC 222: Andrei Platonov's "Chevengur": Text and Contexts

'The power of devastation [Platonov's texts] inflict upon their subject matter exceeds by far any demands of social criticism and should be measured in units that have very little to do with literature as such,' wrote Joseph Brodsky. The graduate course examines Andrei Platonov's ultimate novel "Chevengur" together with political and cultural discourses that framed its production. Primary and secondary readings are in Russian.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)

SLAVIC 225: Communist and Capitalist Fantasies: Science Fiction in the Soviet Union and the United States

What can science fiction tell us about life and art in the 20th century, in the Soviet Union and the United States? Speculative fiction (including sci-fi, fantasy, utopia, dystopia) combines irony and idealism, belief in science and skepticism about it. It appealed to people living under communism and capitalism. The course will relate fiction to the specific culture and politics in both countries, while also drawing transnational connections. We ask why writers and readers, filmmakers and viewers loved this art so much, despite living in what seemed to be very different places. Soviet and Eastern-European writers and filmmakers will include Mikhail Bulgakov, Stanis¿aw Lem, and Andrei Tarkovsky. The Americans may include Kurt Vonnegut, Philip K. Dick, Isaac Asimov, and Octavia Butler. Additional readings in Marx, Lenin, and H.G. Wells.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

SLAVIC 348: Slavic Literature and Culture since the Death of Stalin (REES 348, SLAVIC 148)

The course offers a survey of Soviet and post-Soviet literary texts and films created by Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian artists and marginalized or repressed by the Soviet regime. The first part of the course will focus on the topics of opposition and dissent, generational conflict, modernization, Soviet everyday life, gender, citizenship and national identity, state-published and samizdat literature, "village" and "cosmopolitan" culture, etc. The second part of it will be devoted to the postmodernist aesthetics and ideology in the dismantlement of totalitarian society, as well in the process of shaping post-Soviet identities. The reading materials range from the fictional, poetic, and publicistic works written by Noble-prize (Solzhenitsyn, Brodsky, Alexievich) and other major writers of the period to the drama, film, and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)
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