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1 - 7 of 7 results for: SINY ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SINY 101: The New York City Seminar

This seminar includes all program participants and investigates how New York, as a complex, dynamic city, shapes and is shaped by issues relevant to each quarter's thematic lens. Employing theories of place, concepts of cities and change, and a structured experiential education process, the course integrates the learning from all elements of the program and attends to each student's personal, professional, and intellectual development.May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Miller, R. (PI)

SINY 144: The UN in Action

This course will offer an opportunity to learn how multilateral diplomacy works in practice, taking advantage of the enormous variety of UN offices, agencies, and related policy institutes based in New York to provide an overview of the different dimensions of the UN's work on security, development, human rights, and other multilateral issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gowan, R. (PI)

SINY 162: Sustainable and Resilient Urban Systems in NYC

The objective of the course is to develop a qualitative and quantitative understanding of sustainability and resilience for major urban areas. The first part of the quarter will focus on sustainability and the second on resilience. n nThe course will commence with an overview of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) as defined by the United Nations and how New York City is working towards these goals. The components and pillars that lead to a sustainable urban environment will be defined and corresponding metrics will be used to quantify sustainability utilizing simple data analytics tools. Challenges to meeting these goals will be an important part of reading and project assignments. Examples of sustainability efforts within New York City (NYC) include the development of new parks or renewal of industrial areas for recreational use, design of green buildings, rooftop farms and gardens, and the renovation of transportation facilities as focal points. Field trips will include visit more »
The objective of the course is to develop a qualitative and quantitative understanding of sustainability and resilience for major urban areas. The first part of the quarter will focus on sustainability and the second on resilience. n nThe course will commence with an overview of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) as defined by the United Nations and how New York City is working towards these goals. The components and pillars that lead to a sustainable urban environment will be defined and corresponding metrics will be used to quantify sustainability utilizing simple data analytics tools. Challenges to meeting these goals will be an important part of reading and project assignments. Examples of sustainability efforts within New York City (NYC) include the development of new parks or renewal of industrial areas for recreational use, design of green buildings, rooftop farms and gardens, and the renovation of transportation facilities as focal points. Field trips will include visits to the Highline, the Hudson Yard and the Bank of America building. n nResilience of urban systems will be the focus of the second half of the class. Issues of resilience will be discussed in relation to major disasters including floods, extreme storms and climate change. The 7 global resilience targets will be identified according to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The major components of resilience will be reviewed in class followed by a visit to or by a representative from the 100 Resilient City Initiative supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. The Superstorm Sandy in 2012 will be used as a case study to identify the disaster impact to the urban environment in NYC. We will discuss the emergency response of the City after Sandy and assess the performance of the NYC resilience plan. We will explore how New York City is preparing to respond and recover from future major disasters as part of the 100 Resilient Cities Initiative supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. n nNovel technologies will be discussed in terms of their implications for disaster resilience and sustainability. We will delve into a case study showing how modern and decentralized power systems with rooftop solar panels and microgrids can make NYC more resilient and sustainable.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

SINY 166: Just Art? Equity, Immigration and Art in the Global City

This course focuses on relations between art, immigration and equity. Through several case studies, we will learn to think critically about how aesthetics and politics work together. In addition to studying particular works of art, we will travel to several foundations and institutions to learn about their strategies for fostering equity and the arts. How do art, activism and racial justice connect in performances aimed at changing ideas? How do major arts institutions address questions of equity and difference? We will discuss how art can function as a form of aesthetic knowledge in the service of justice. In doing so, we will grapple with the role of the creative arts in mitigating social change and study artists who have sought to intervene in the restrictive covenants of racial, gender and other segregationist or national orders. Our case studies will shift across media, subjects, objects and temporalities. From artists in New York responding to the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima an more »
This course focuses on relations between art, immigration and equity. Through several case studies, we will learn to think critically about how aesthetics and politics work together. In addition to studying particular works of art, we will travel to several foundations and institutions to learn about their strategies for fostering equity and the arts. How do art, activism and racial justice connect in performances aimed at changing ideas? How do major arts institutions address questions of equity and difference? We will discuss how art can function as a form of aesthetic knowledge in the service of justice. In doing so, we will grapple with the role of the creative arts in mitigating social change and study artists who have sought to intervene in the restrictive covenants of racial, gender and other segregationist or national orders. Our case studies will shift across media, subjects, objects and temporalities. From artists in New York responding to the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to the radical work of Yayoi Kusama¿s 1960s performances, to a plays about immigration such as Lynn Nottage¿s Intimate Apparel and Lin Manuel Miranda¿s Hamilton¿the latter a show that exemplifies how art, activism and racial justice come together--the cross-cast musical gave paid opportunities and leading parts to a full cast of performers of color while also recasting the history of immigration in the United States and produced a new form of hip hop. We will read work by James Baldwin and more! We will visit the Tenement Museum as well as the Schomburg museum and archive and meet with current curators and arts professionals from across the city.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Brody, J. (PI)

SINY 168: Safe Cities: A Study of Institutional Responses to Gender Based Violence in the Global City

The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexua more »
The course proposes a broad theoretical as well as an experiential and immersive introduction to some of the most urgent issues surrounding institutional responses to gender based violence (GBV) and related forms of gender discrimination today.n nThe course is divided into three main sections: a theoretical framework that introduces students to contemporary arguments and ideas around gender equality, violence, women's empowerment, and legal protections offered under international and domestic law; a critical overview of contemporary New York City and State actors' interventions against gender discrimination, such as the Governor's 2019 Women's Justice Agenda, the Mayor's She Built NYC campaign, and the NYC4CEDAW Act Coalition's campaign for a NYC ordinance for the implementation of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and a series of thematic case studies that focus on specific challenges including in the areas of reproductive rights, sexual assault, sex work, trafficking and the rights of people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.n nThe latter section will require engagement with actors that are instrumental in responding to and preventing gender based violence, and may include, Victor Madrigal-Borloz the UN Independent Expert on Protection against Violence and Discrimination based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, Sgt. Greg Accomando of the NYPD Special Victim's Division, Abagail Nelson the Senior Vice President for Programs at Episcopal Relief & Development, and Deborah Hayashi of the North Central Bronx Sexual Assault Response Team. n nThrough these frameworks and studies, the course offers a well-rounded introduction to the complexity of interventions against gender based discrimination in the context of a Global City. The transnational scope of the course is anchored by New York City as an incubator and instigator for innovative interventions against gender inequality, and there will be an emphasis on the cross-pollination that occurs between the City, State and national and international NGO platforms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SINY 170: Practical Business

The purpose of the class is to provide an overview of basic business concepts and tools with a focus on practicality. The course will be project based, broken into three parts n¿ Class case study over 6 weeks, looking at 1-2 companies n¿ Small group project over 2 weeks on a company of the student's choice n¿ Project presentations over last two weeksn nClass will include discussions with leaders across different industries, such as Steven Gutentag, Co-Founder, Thirty Madison; Max Shron, Director of Data, Warby Parker; Edwin Jager, Managing Director - Fundamental Equities, the D. E. Shaw group (Stanford alumnus); Monish Kumar, Senior Partner & Managing Director, Boston Consulting Group.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

SINY 199: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4
Instructors: Miller, R. (PI)
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