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1 - 10 of 27 results for: RELIGST

RELIGST 1: Religion Around the Globe

This course surveys major religious traditions of the world. Through examination of a variety of materials, including scriptures and other spiritual writings, religious objects and artifacts, and modern documentary and film, we explore Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Daoism as rich historical and living traditions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 8N: Gardens and Sacred Space in Japan

This seminar will explore gardens and sacred spaces in Japan. We will study the development of Japanese garden design from the earliest records to contemporary Japan. We will especially focus on the religious, aesthetic, and social dimensions of gardens and sacred spaces. This seminar features a fieldtrip to a Japanese garden in the area, in order to study how Japanese garden design was adapted in North America.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mross, M. (PI)

RELIGST 21X: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and evil have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like religious tolerance, voting rights, and wilderness preservation play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Satz, D. (PI)

RELIGST 50: Exploring Buddhism

A comprehensive historical survey of the Buddhist tradition, from its beginnings to the 21st century, covering principal teachings and practices, institutional and social forms, and artistic and iconographical expressions. (Formerly RELIGST 14.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Harrison, P. (PI)

RELIGST 123: The Hindu Epics and the Ethics of Dharma

The two great Hindu Epics, the Mahabharata and Ramayana, offer a sustained reflection on the nature of virtuous living in the face of insoluble ethical dilemmas. Their treatment of the concept of dharma, understood simultaneously as ethical action and the universal order that upholds the cosmos, lies at the heart of both Gandhian non-violent resistance and communalist interreligious conflict. This course will focus on a reading of selections from the Epics in English translation, supplemented with a consideration of how the texts have been interpreted in South Asian literary history and contemporary politics and public life in India.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fisher, E. (PI)

RELIGST 129: Milk and Honey, Wine and Blood: Food, Justice, and Ethnic Identity in Jewish Culture (JEWISHST 129A)

This course examines Jewish culture and the food practices and traditions that have shaped and continue to shape it. Students learn to prepare a variety of meals while studying about the historical and literary traditions associated with them, such as the dietary `laws¿ and the long history of their interpretation, as well as the cultivation of eating as devotional practice in Jewish mystical traditions. We will explore how regional foods the world over contribute to the formation of distinct Jewish ethnic identities, and how these traditions shape contemporary Jewish food ethics. The course includes guest visits by professional chefs and food writers, and field trips to a local winery.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

RELIGST 133: Muslims, Jews and Christians

Relationships between Muslims, Jews, and Christians today are informed by a multitude of complex and often painful histories. These faith traditions emerged out of deep and sustained engagement with one another sharing theological and ethical principles, and revering many of the same figures and there have been many periods of rich and productive interaction. Yet there have also been areas of dissension and conflict, and periods when theological, social, or political disagreement devolved into violence and oppression. In recent times (especially following the Holocaust and the establishment of the modern State of Israel), religious, political, and intellectual leaders of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian communities, in the U.S. and around the world, have recognized the need to forge deeper and more meaningful relationships with one another. Knowledge and understanding of the perspectives that different communities and individuals bring to bear on their entangled past, present, and future more »
Relationships between Muslims, Jews, and Christians today are informed by a multitude of complex and often painful histories. These faith traditions emerged out of deep and sustained engagement with one another sharing theological and ethical principles, and revering many of the same figures and there have been many periods of rich and productive interaction. Yet there have also been areas of dissension and conflict, and periods when theological, social, or political disagreement devolved into violence and oppression. In recent times (especially following the Holocaust and the establishment of the modern State of Israel), religious, political, and intellectual leaders of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian communities, in the U.S. and around the world, have recognized the need to forge deeper and more meaningful relationships with one another. Knowledge and understanding of the perspectives that different communities and individuals bring to bear on their entangled past, present, and future are a critical part of efforts to resolve intransigent conflicts and advance mutual interests. This course explores some of the most significant moments of interaction through literature and art, polemic and dialogue that have shaped engagements between Muslims, Jews, and Christians throughout history, and examines both prospects and pitfalls for engagement in the present and future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Marcus, A. (PI)

RELIGST 143V: Christianity, Pentecostalism, and Social Challenges in Latin America

"Jesus is the solution": Most Pentecostal believers consider that for God nothing is impossible, and expect their faith to be not only a path towards God and Heaven but also a safe-way out of humiliation, hopelessness, poverty, illness, crime, drugs, homosexuality, and so on. This course aims to explore the key to the paradoxical success of a religion that in general imposes rigorous norms on its followers¿ life-styles (e.g. no alcohol, sexual discipline, generous donations, etc.), but nonetheless boasts a strong growth of willing converts and presents testimonies of drastic personal change. Various different interpretations of this topic will be examined, with a particular focus on religious market theory, compensation theory and Honneth's philosophical theory of recognition. As an exemplary case, this course will evaluate conversion in jail. That is, how has Pentecostalism come to be considered by many as a way -perhaps the only one- out of a world of drug-addiction, violence and cri more »
"Jesus is the solution": Most Pentecostal believers consider that for God nothing is impossible, and expect their faith to be not only a path towards God and Heaven but also a safe-way out of humiliation, hopelessness, poverty, illness, crime, drugs, homosexuality, and so on. This course aims to explore the key to the paradoxical success of a religion that in general imposes rigorous norms on its followers¿ life-styles (e.g. no alcohol, sexual discipline, generous donations, etc.), but nonetheless boasts a strong growth of willing converts and presents testimonies of drastic personal change. Various different interpretations of this topic will be examined, with a particular focus on religious market theory, compensation theory and Honneth's philosophical theory of recognition. As an exemplary case, this course will evaluate conversion in jail. That is, how has Pentecostalism come to be considered by many as a way -perhaps the only one- out of a world of drug-addiction, violence and crime?nIn the first part of the course, students will become familiar with some of the features of the Latin American religious field and with the main theories on religious conversions in Latin America. In the second part, a new approach to the phenomenon based on Honneth's theory of recognition will be analyzed. This approach will help students develop a better understanding of situations otherwise unexplained such as the success (with obvious nuances) of the Pentecostal groups among excluded populations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 165: Modern Jewish Mystics: Devotion in a Secular Age (JEWISHST 125)

The twentieth-century was a time of tremendous upheaval and unspeakable tragedy for the Jewish communities of Europe. But the past hundred years were also a period of great renewal for Jewish spirituality, a renaissance that has continued into the present day. We will explore the mystic writings of figures from the Safed Renaissance, the Hasidic masters, with a particular focus on the works of Martin Buber, Hillel Zeitlin, Abraham Isaac Kook, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Arthur Green. We will examine their teachings in light of the challenges of the two World Wars, the Holocaust, and the processes of modernity and secularism. Consideration will be made of the unique cultural contexts of modern Israel and contemporary America.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mayse, E. (PI)

RELIGST 173X: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 6L, CLASSICS 208L)

Readings in later Latin, drawing on the vast bodies of texts from the late antique, medieval and early modern periods. Each week students will prepare selections in advance of class meetings; class time will be devoted to translation and discussion. Students taking this course will gain exposure to a wide range of later Latin texts; hone translation skills; and develop an awareness of the grammatical and stylistic features of post-classical Latin. The course is aimed both at classical Latinists seeking to broaden their reading experience and at medievalists and early modernists seeking to consolidate their Latin language skills. May be repeat for credit.nnPrior experience in Latin is required, preferably CLASSICS 11L. Equivalent accepted. Anyone unsure whether to take this course is encouraged to contact the instructor in advance.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Klopacz, J. (PI)
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