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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 36 results for: PUBLPOL ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PUBLPOL 100: Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program

This course is designed to give Stanford undergraduates an introduction to civil-military relations, leadership development, and operational aspects of American foreign policy. Admitted undergraduates will be mentored by a distinguished leader from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or State Department for the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters of the 2020-21 academic year. Participation in all three quarters is required. These military leaders and diplomats are part of the Hoover Institution¿s National Security Affairs Fellows program. The course will be held on Zoom and the scheduled class time will be used for group activities, lectures from the National Security Affairs Fellows on their experiences in the military and the State Department, small group meetings with mentees and mentors, and special sessions with senior American foreign policy leaders. At the end of each quarter, students write short reflection papers. No expertise in international affairs is necessary to apply and all majors are welcome. Selection is based on academic excellence, extracurricular leadership, and interest in international affairs. The program is directed by Dr. Amy Zegart. To apply, send a cover letter and resume to Taylor McLamb (twj@stanford.edu) by September 1, 2020.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Zegart, A. (PI)

PUBLPOL 104: Economic Policy Analysis (ECON 150, PUBLPOL 204)

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 115: Practical Training

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

PUBLPOL 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118Y, CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

PUBLPOL 122: BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience (BIOE 122, EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promi more »
Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promising technologies for pandemic response and resilience, and other relevant topics. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, public health leaders, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. Additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

PUBLPOL 124: American Political Institutions in Uncertain Times (POLISCI 120C)

This course examines how the rules that govern elections and the policy process determine political outcomes. It explores the historical forces that have shaped American political institutions, contemporary challenges to governing, and prospects for change. Topics covered include partisan polarization and legislative gridlock, the politicization of the courts, electoral institutions and voting rights, the expansion of presidential power, campaign finance and lobbying, representational biases among elected officials, and the role of political institutions in maintaining the rule of law. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the strategic interactions between Congress, the presidency, and the courts and the importance of informal norms and political culture. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 120C.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 141: Monitoring the Crisis (PSYCH 145A, SOC 141, SOC 241, URBANST 149)

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 146: Policy, Politics and the 2020 Elections: What 2020 Means for Future Campaigns and Elections (COMM 153A, COMM 253A, POLISCI 72, PUBLPOL 246)

(Same as LAW 7057). This course looks back at the 2020 election campaign and tries to discern lessons and takeaways for future campaigns and elections. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns, including the Trump and Biden teams.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

PUBLPOL 154: Politics and Policy in California

State politics and policy making, including the roles of the legislature, legislative leadership, governor, special interests, campaign finance, advocacy groups, ballot initiatives, state and federal laws, media, and research organizations. Case studies involving budgets, education, pensions, health care, political reform, environmental reforms, water, transportation and more. Evaluation of political actions, both inside and outside of government, that can affect California policy and social outcomes. Meetings with elected officials, policymakers, and advocates in class and during a day-long field trip to Sacramento.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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