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1 - 10 of 35 results for: PUBLPOL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PUBLPOL 1: Introduction to Public Policy

Public Policy 1 is an introduction to the wide range of fields and methods used in Public Policy analysis including economics, political science, social psychology, justice, ethics and organizations. The course will have weekly speakers who will provide examples of policy analysis from a variety of perspectives. Attendance mandatory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 55N: Public Policy and Personal Finance (ECON 25N)

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 63Q: Democratizing Ethics with Discrimination, Inequality, Injustice and Technology in Mind

This seminar/practicum will invite students to ¿roll up our sleeves¿ and deliver concrete recommendations for making ethical decision-making accessible to ordinary citizens rather than just determined by corporate giants, law makers or academic experts. We will explore practical approaches to the following questions: How can we make ethical decision-making accessible to ordinary citizens in a complex world of technology, biology and even space exploration? How can we incentivize citizens to care about integrating ethics into their decision-making? How do we each have ethical power in society even where economic and technological control lie with tech giants and lodged in the brains of experts? What, if anything, is different about citizens¿ sense of moral responsibility in society today (and how has technology contributed to shifting views)? How can we develop an ethics barometer¿soliciting the views, and facilitating the influence of, ordinary citizens on key ethical questions outside more »
This seminar/practicum will invite students to ¿roll up our sleeves¿ and deliver concrete recommendations for making ethical decision-making accessible to ordinary citizens rather than just determined by corporate giants, law makers or academic experts. We will explore practical approaches to the following questions: How can we make ethical decision-making accessible to ordinary citizens in a complex world of technology, biology and even space exploration? How can we incentivize citizens to care about integrating ethics into their decision-making? How do we each have ethical power in society even where economic and technological control lie with tech giants and lodged in the brains of experts? What, if anything, is different about citizens¿ sense of moral responsibility in society today (and how has technology contributed to shifting views)? How can we develop an ethics barometer¿soliciting the views, and facilitating the influence of, ordinary citizens on key ethical questions outside of normal channels like voting and individual engagement with social media? The course will consider a number of cutting-edge topics from Covid-19 and gene editing and long-standing challenges such as racism. Highly interactive course. Very short papers and teamwork along the way in lieu of final paper or exam. 3 credits (option C/NC for students not wishing WAYS credit). Will be offered on-line Spring 2021.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Liautaud, S. (PI)

PUBLPOL 73: Energy Policy in California and the West (CEE 263G, ENERGY 73, POLISCI 73)

This seminar provides an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies and Western energy organizations in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures, in California, the West and internationally. The course covers three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies and Western energy organizations; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of the 21st century electricity system in California and the West. The seminar will also provide students a guideline of what to expect in professional working environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

PUBLPOL 100: Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program

This course is designed to give Stanford undergraduates an introduction to civil-military relations, leadership development, and operational aspects of American foreign policy. Admitted undergraduates will be mentored by a distinguished leader from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or State Department for the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters of the 2020-21 academic year. Participation in all three quarters is required. These military leaders and diplomats are part of the Hoover Institution¿s National Security Affairs Fellows program. The course will be held on Zoom and the scheduled class time will be used for group activities, lectures from the National Security Affairs Fellows on their experiences in the military and the State Department, small group meetings with mentees and mentors, and special sessions with senior American foreign policy leaders. At the end of each quarter, students write short reflection papers. No expertise in international affairs is necessary to apply and all majors are welcome. Selection is based on academic excellence, extracurricular leadership, and interest in international affairs. The program is directed by Dr. Amy Zegart. To apply, send a cover letter and resume to Taylor McLamb (twj@stanford.edu) by September 1, 2020.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Zegart, A. (PI)

PUBLPOL 101: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics, which means this is a course about individuals, identities, and institutions. How do Americans come to think andnreason about politics? What is the role that identities play in affecting the political judgments that individuals make? How do our political institutionsnrespond to the demands of a diverse public that disagrees about issues related to race and justice, income and wealth inequality, climate change, gunncontrol, reproductive rights, the power of the executive, and the role that government ought to play in the lives of the governed? And how do we makensense of this seemingly peculiar contemporary moment in American politics? These are not easy questions, but they are ones for which political sciencenprovides a useful foundation to guide our inquiry. The objective of this course is to introduce students to various concepts and theoretical frameworks thatnhelp us understand the messiness and complexity of American politics. In addition to classroom lectures and discussion sections, students will benrequired to apply concepts and theoretical frameworks to contemporary issues in American politics. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for 5 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 103F: Ethics of Truth in a Post-Truth World (PUBLPOL 203F)

This course will explore changing notions of truth in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are blurring the boundaries of humanity and boring through traditional notions of nation states, institutions, and human identity. We will ask one over-arching question: does truth matter anymore? If so, why and how? If not, why not? Either way, how does truth relate to ethical decision-making by individuals and institutions and to an ethical society? How does truth relate to a life well lived? Six themes will organize our exploration of more specific topics: science and subjectivity; identity; memory; authenticity; religious truth; and truth and the law. Examples of topics to be explored include, among others: truth and technology (from deep fakes to home devices); white supremacy; DNA testing and the ¿identify as¿ movement, and identity; University history (Rhodes, Georgetown slavery, Yale Calhoun College...); the connections among truth, memory, and history; new more »
This course will explore changing notions of truth in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are blurring the boundaries of humanity and boring through traditional notions of nation states, institutions, and human identity. We will ask one over-arching question: does truth matter anymore? If so, why and how? If not, why not? Either way, how does truth relate to ethical decision-making by individuals and institutions and to an ethical society? How does truth relate to a life well lived? Six themes will organize our exploration of more specific topics: science and subjectivity; identity; memory; authenticity; religious truth; and truth and the law. Examples of topics to be explored include, among others: truth and technology (from deep fakes to home devices); white supremacy; DNA testing and the ¿identify as¿ movement, and identity; University history (Rhodes, Georgetown slavery, Yale Calhoun College...); the connections among truth, memory, and history; new questions in gender and racial identity; Chinese beautifying app Meitu and other social media "truth modifiers"; the sharing economy; the impact of AI and DNA testing sites on legal truth. Scotty McClennan will explore truth through major literary characters and the impact of religion on truth. We will consider how we determine and verify the truth; how we "do" truth; the role of truth in ethical decision-making; the importance of truth to effective ethical policy; and the relationship of the truth to a life well lived. An analytically rigorous short final paper in lieu of exam. This three-credit seminar may be taken as a stand-alone course or may accompany PUBLPOL 134 Ethics on the Edge to full the Public Policy major ethics requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements and students taking the course for Ways credit must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC. To satisfy a Ways requirement, this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or `CR¿ grade satisfies the Ways requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Liautaud, S. (PI)

PUBLPOL 105: Empirical Methods in Public Policy (PUBLPOL 205)

Methods of empirical analysis and applications in public policy. Emphasis on causal inference and program evaluation. Public policy applications include health, labor and saving. Assignments include hands-on data analysis, evaluation of existing literature, and a final research project. Objective is to obtain tools to 1) critically evaluate evidence used to make policy decisions and 2) perform empirical analysis to answer questions in public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102B. Enrollment is limited to Public Policy students. Public Policy students must take the course for a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 106: Law and Economics (ECON 154, PUBLPOL 206)

In this course, we explore the role of law in promoting social well-being (happiness). Law, among its other benefits, can serve as a mechanism to harmonize private incentives with cooperative gains, to maintain an equitable division of those gains, and to deter social defection and dystopia. Law is thus an implementation of the social contract and essential to civilization. Economic analysis of law focuses on the welfare-enhancing incentive effects of law (and of law enforcement). More generally, we study the law's role in reducing the risks of cooperation, achieved by fixing expectations of what courts or the state will do in possible futures. Prerequisite: ECON 50.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 115: Practical Training

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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