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1 - 10 of 26 results for: PUBLPOL

PUBLPOL 14: Navigating Financial Crises in the Modern Global Economy (ECON 14)

What causes financial crises? What are the keys to anticipating, preventing, and managing disruptions in the global financial system? This course prepares students to navigate future episodes as policymakers, finance professionals, and citizens by going inside the practical decisions made in an unfolding crisis, from the U.S. government and IMF to the boardroom and trading floor. Students will learn warning signs of distress; market structures that govern crisis dynamics; strategic interactions among the key actors; and lessons learned for creating a more resilient system. Concepts will be applied to real-world experiences in emerging market crises, the U.S. housing and global financial crisis, and the European sovereign crisis, as well as prospective risks from China's financial system and unwinding of extraordinary central bank stimulus.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Toloui, R. (PI)

PUBLPOL 51: Microeconomics for Policy (INTLPOL 204A, PUBLPOL 301A)

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PublPol 51 as a substitute for the Econ 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take Econ 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bulow, J. (PI)

PUBLPOL 100: Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program

The Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program is a yearly program for Stanford undergraduate students that begins in September of the academic year. The program provides a unique opportunity for Stanford students with a deep interest in international affairs to engage with distinguished practitioners in the field. Each National Security Affairs Fellow is a high-ranking member of his or her military branch or state agency with years of real world experience in U.S. foreign policy. The residential fellowship year taps the rising stars in each service or department. Previous Fellows have gone on to serve in the highest levels of the U.S. government. While the Fellows provide a great opportunity for students to learn more about international security issues and careers, students are also a vital resource to the Fellows, providing a key point of contact to student life at Stanford. The Fellows have many obligations, but typically welcome the opportunity to spea more »
The Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program is a yearly program for Stanford undergraduate students that begins in September of the academic year. The program provides a unique opportunity for Stanford students with a deep interest in international affairs to engage with distinguished practitioners in the field. Each National Security Affairs Fellow is a high-ranking member of his or her military branch or state agency with years of real world experience in U.S. foreign policy. The residential fellowship year taps the rising stars in each service or department. Previous Fellows have gone on to serve in the highest levels of the U.S. government. While the Fellows provide a great opportunity for students to learn more about international security issues and careers, students are also a vital resource to the Fellows, providing a key point of contact to student life at Stanford. The Fellows have many obligations, but typically welcome the opportunity to speak to student groups, guest lecture in classes, and participate in campus life. A large part of the student¿s role is to facilitate those connections to students, faculty, courses, and activities at Stanford. Selected students are assigned to one of Hoover's 8 incoming Fellows. As part of the mentorship program, Fellows will meet with students at least twice a quarter. The mentees will also receive invitations to private Hoover events with senior U.S. and foreign leaders throughout the year, some of which will require mandatory attendance. Mentees are also expected to participate in a service day with a local Boys and Girls Club organized by the National Security Affairs Fellows program. At the end of each quarter, a short reflection paper is required. Selection criteria are based on academic excellence, extracurricular leadership, and demonstrated interest in national security for rising freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Priority is given to applicants who plan to be in residence for the entire academic year and those who have no prior or current military experience.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PUBLPOL 103C: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 307)

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 103.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 113: America: Unequal (CSRE 3P, SOC 3)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Grusky, D. (PI)

PUBLPOL 115: Practical Training

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PUBLPOL 118X: Sustainable Urban Systems Fundamentals (ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X)

Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PUBLPOL 135: Regional Politics and Decision Making in Silicon Valley and the Greater Bay Area

Dynamics of regional leadership and decision making in Silicon Valley, a complex region composed of 40 cities and four counties without any overarching framework for governance. Formal and informal institutions shaping outcomes in the region. Case studies include transportation, workforce development, housing and land use, and climate change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hancock, R. (PI)

PUBLPOL 156: Health Care Policy and Reform

Focuses on healthcare policy at the national, state, and local levels. Includes sessions on international models, health insurance, the evolution of healthcare policy in the U.S., key U.S. healthcare topics (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare, Medicaid, public employee retiree health care), the role of technology, reform proposals (single payer, national health care, consumer-based systems, regulated markets, state and local reform efforts), efficiency/cost drivers and prospects for future policy. The course includes sessions on effective memo writing and presentation of policy proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 198: Directed Readings in Public Policy

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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