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1 - 10 of 37 results for: PSYCH ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

PSYCH 21N: How to Make a Racist (AFRICAAM 121N, CSRE 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)

PSYCH 35: Minds and Machines (CS 24, LINGUIST 35, PHIL 99, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Students must take this course before being approved to declare Symbolic Systems as a major. All students interested in studying Symbolic Systems are urged to take this course early in their student careers. The course material and presentation will be at an introductory level, without prerequisites.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

PSYCH 50: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

How does our brain give rise to our abilities to perceive, act and think? Survey of the basic facts, empirical evidence, theories and methods of study in cognitive neuroscience exploring how cognition is instantiated in neural activity. Representative topics include perceptual and motor processes, decision making, learning and memory, attention, reward processing, reinforcement learning, sensory inference and cognitive control.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYCH 90: INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: A NEUROSCIENCE PERSPECTIVE

This course will provide students with an overview of the field of clinical psychology, the various roles of clinical psychologists in research and practice, and implications of current research in neuroscience for clinical psychology. We will discuss the definition and history of clinical psychology as a profession, research methods used in clinical psychology, issues in diagnosis and classification of disorders, techniques used in the assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, various approaches to therapeutic intervention, and issues related to ethics, professionalism, and training in clinical psychology. Throughout this course we will review and integrate relevant research in the field of clinical neuroscience with our discussion and understanding of clinical psychology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 139A: Bites and Insights

By its very nature psychology is interdisciplinary. This course will consist of student-led workshops for those who are interested in the role of psychology in today¿s society. Each week a different student will talk about an interest of theirs -- anything from Disney movies to memes -- and how it relates to psychology. Students are encouraged to be as creative as possible and take initiative! (Presented by the Stanford Undergraduate Psychology Association.)
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

PSYCH 146: Observation of Children

Learning about children through guided discussions and video analyses from Bing Nursery School. Together we will looking into children's interactions with the world around them within the contexts of their physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. We will also be examining their experiences in relation to research and theory. Note: Students will enroll in discussion sections through Canvas during the first week of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

PSYCH 147: Development in Early Childhood

For children playing is more than just fun; it is essential for children¿s growth and wellbeing. Play is so important to optimal child development that it has been recognized by the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights as a right of every child. This course explores this connection between different types of play and children¿s development in four arenas: social, emotional, cognitive, and physical. In order to promote optimal learning and growth in children, it is important to recognize that these cognitive, physical, social, and emotional systems are intertwined. In this course students will not only learn about play, but also examine their own play experiences and histories. Using readings, recordings of children at play, videos, presentations, and reflections we will delve into the experience of play for children and ourselves. The course is rooted in the play experiences and philosophy of Bing Nursery School, a laboratory school at Stanford. For over 50 years it has been engaging children in play-based learning experiences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3

PSYCH 180: Advanced Seminar on Racial Bias and Structural Inequality

How do we address racial bias and inequities? What role do our institutions play in creating, maintaining, and magnifying those inequities? What role do we play? In this course, we will examine racial bias and inequality in our neighborhoods, schools, workplaces, healthcare facilities, and criminal justice system. In every domain, we will focus our attention on the tools and interventions that can be used to mitigate bias and decrease racial disparities. This course will be conducted as a seminar. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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