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1 - 10 of 21 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 102S: Introduction to Neuroscience

Introduction to structure and function of the nervous system. The course first surveys neuroscience research methods, physiology, and gross anatomy. We then study the brain systems which produce basic functions such as perception and motion, as well as complex processes like sleep, memory, and emotion. Finally, we examine these principles in cases of neurological and psychiatric disorders.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 108S: Introduction to Social Psychology

This course aims to blend a comprehensive overview of social psychology with in-depth lectures exploring the history of the field, reviewing major findings and highlighting areas of current research. The course will focus on classic studies that have profoundly changed our understanding of human nature and social interaction, and, in turn, have triggered significant paradigm shifts within the field. Some of the topics covered in this class will include: individuals and groups, conformity and obedience, attraction, intergroup relations, and judgment and decision-making. The course, overall, will attempt to foster interest in social psychology as well as scientific curiosity in a fun, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 113S: Developmental Psychology

This class will introduce students to the basic principles of developmental psychology. As well as providing a more classic general overview, we will also look towards current methods and findings. Students will gain an appreciation of how developmental psychology as a science can be applied to their general understanding of children and the complicated process of growing into adults.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bridgers, S. (PI)

PSYCH 115S: Personality Psychology

This course will focus on current empirical and theoretical approaches to personality. Lectures will be organized around the following questions central to personality research: How and why do people differ? How do we measure individual differences? Does personality change over time? How does personality interact with sociocultural factors to influence behavior? What makes people happy? What are the physical, mental, and social consequences of personalities?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 125S: Language andThought

How are we able to produce and comprehend language in all its complexity? How does language processing interact with other parts of cognition? In this course, we will focus on several main themes: language production and comprehension, discourse, language acquisition, bilingualism, and linguistic relativity. We will explore these themes through lecture, demonstrations, analysis of empirical work, and student-led discussion. Special attention will also be given to the various experimental methods we use to conduct psycholinguistic and developmental research (e.g., self-paced reading, eye-tracking, cross-modal priming, and neural imaging).
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Yoon, E. (PI)

PSYCH 135S: Sex and Sexual Assault on College Campuses

Students on college campuses are disproportionately at risk of sexual assault. One in every five women and one in twenty men will be sexually assaulted during their time in college. In this course, we will use a cultural psychological lens to analyze the ways in which institutions, ideas, and individuals interact to affect both sex and sexual assault. We will tie together differing research opinions about how sexual misconduct is normalized and perpetuated on college campuses, and examine the roles of Greek life, hookup culture, and party culture. We will take an intersectional approach as we deconstruct gender roles, look at sex and consent in straight and LGBTQIA+ communities, and examine how power impacts sex. Additionally, we will explore the effects of current political and social movements such as #MeToo on campus culture. This course will combine lectures and in class discussions with weekly reflections, where students will have a chance to connect what they are learning in class to their own lived experiences. Students will leave this course with a framework for approaching, analyzing, and changing both campus culture and their own relationships.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Handron, C. (PI)

PSYCH 141S: The Psychology of Health: Culture, Self, and Society

What is health? How does someone become healthy or maintain good health? In the US, mainstream narratives about health tend to focus on individual choices and behavior. In this course, we take a broader focus, examining how individual health is shaped by social interactions (e.g., with family, friends, doctors), institutions (e.g., media, policy, advertising), and broad cultural ideas and values (e.g., personal responsibility, independence). Drawing from psychological research, we will examine topics at the intersection of self and society, including: the role of stress, stigma and blame in shaping health and wellbeing, cultural processes contributing to health disparities, attitudes about the proper role of government in shaping public health, and the erosion of trust in medical authority (e.g. anti-vaccination attitudes). We will also consider how race, gender, and socioeconomic status impact health outcomes. Throughout the course, we will analyze cultural products including advertis more »
What is health? How does someone become healthy or maintain good health? In the US, mainstream narratives about health tend to focus on individual choices and behavior. In this course, we take a broader focus, examining how individual health is shaped by social interactions (e.g., with family, friends, doctors), institutions (e.g., media, policy, advertising), and broad cultural ideas and values (e.g., personal responsibility, independence). Drawing from psychological research, we will examine topics at the intersection of self and society, including: the role of stress, stigma and blame in shaping health and wellbeing, cultural processes contributing to health disparities, attitudes about the proper role of government in shaping public health, and the erosion of trust in medical authority (e.g. anti-vaccination attitudes). We will also consider how race, gender, and socioeconomic status impact health outcomes. Throughout the course, we will analyze cultural products including advertisements, media stories, health PSAs, and government statements to better understand the transmission of cultural ideas of health. Finally, we will discuss various opportunities and barriers to creating social and cultural change regarding health. The course will empower students learn to recognize and analyze the influence of culture on everyday functioning and apply that understanding to improving their own and other people's health outcomes.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 147S: Introduction to the Psychology of Emotion

What are emotions? What purpose do they serve? How do we measure them? Can we control them? In this course, we will explore some of the most interesting questions in psychology: questions about emotion. Emotions shape our perceptions of the world, influence critical life decisions, and allow us to connect with others. This seminar will provide a selective review of the scientific study of emotion in Affective Science. The first unit of the course will focus on the theoretical foundations, the basic science of emotion, and methods for measuring emotions. In the second unit of the course, we will discuss topics at the intersection of motivation and emotion, such as decision-making and self-control. In the third unit, we will delve into the social function of emotions. In the fourth unit of the course, we will study the ways people succeed and fail at controlling their emotions. In the fifth unit, we will discuss a variety of additional topics such as how emotions change across the lifesp more »
What are emotions? What purpose do they serve? How do we measure them? Can we control them? In this course, we will explore some of the most interesting questions in psychology: questions about emotion. Emotions shape our perceptions of the world, influence critical life decisions, and allow us to connect with others. This seminar will provide a selective review of the scientific study of emotion in Affective Science. The first unit of the course will focus on the theoretical foundations, the basic science of emotion, and methods for measuring emotions. In the second unit of the course, we will discuss topics at the intersection of motivation and emotion, such as decision-making and self-control. In the third unit, we will delve into the social function of emotions. In the fourth unit of the course, we will study the ways people succeed and fail at controlling their emotions. In the fifth unit, we will discuss a variety of additional topics such as how emotions change across the lifespan, how emotions can be harnessed to engineer behavior change, as well as emotions and artificial intelligence. My goal is that you will leave this course with a scientifically-informed understanding of your own and others' emotions as well as strategies for how to effectively use and manage your feelings in daily life.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: O'Leary, D. (PI)

PSYCH 149S: Vertical Neuroscience: How the Brain Enables Climbing

Explores the brain mechanisms of physical action, including how the brain learns to create complex movements, the neural circuitry of the motor system, and how pain, fear, and adrenaline are closely tied to these systems. An emphasis is placed on real-life examples through weekly rock climbing courses that tie closely into the course content.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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