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1 - 10 of 47 results for: PSYCH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

One of the most exciting transformations in the social sciences in recent years is the finding that brief psychological exercises can improve important outcomes for months and years such as raising school achievement and reducing inequality, improving health, and reducing intergroup conflict. These interventions help individuals flourish and help our society live up to its ideals. They address critical psychological questions people have, like ¿Do people like me belong in this school?¿, ¿Can I learn math?¿, ¿Am I bad mom?¿, and ¿Can groups in conflict change?¿. In this seminar, we will learn about ¿psychologically wise¿ interventions; how they work; how they can cause lasting benefits; their intellectual lineage; how they can be used, adapted, and scaled to address contemporary problems; and challenges and mistakes that can arise in doing so. In addition to learning from classic and contemporary research, you will design your very own wise intervention and workshop others¿ efforts. Wor more »
One of the most exciting transformations in the social sciences in recent years is the finding that brief psychological exercises can improve important outcomes for months and years such as raising school achievement and reducing inequality, improving health, and reducing intergroup conflict. These interventions help individuals flourish and help our society live up to its ideals. They address critical psychological questions people have, like ¿Do people like me belong in this school?¿, ¿Can I learn math?¿, ¿Am I bad mom?¿, and ¿Can groups in conflict change?¿. In this seminar, we will learn about ¿psychologically wise¿ interventions; how they work; how they can cause lasting benefits; their intellectual lineage; how they can be used, adapted, and scaled to address contemporary problems; and challenges and mistakes that can arise in doing so. In addition to learning from classic and contemporary research, you will design your very own wise intervention and workshop others¿ efforts. Working with a community partner, you will explore a problem your partner faces, identify a specific psychological process you think contributes to this problem, and design an intervention to address this process to improve outcomes, which your partner could implement and evaluate. You will share your approach in a final report with both your seminar-mates and your community partner. When you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

PSYCH 12N: Self Theories

Preference to freshmen. The impact of people's belief in a growing versus fixed self on their motivation and performance in school, business, sports, and relationships. How such theories develop and can be changed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dweck, C. (PI)

PSYCH 21N: How to Make a Racist (AFRICAAM 121N, CSRE 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)

PSYCH 35: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PHIL 99, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

PSYCH 90: INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: A NEUROSCIENCE PERSPECTIVE

This course will provide students with an overview of the field of clinical psychology, the various roles of clinical psychologists in research and practice, and implications of current research in neuroscience for clinical psychology. We will discuss the definition and history of clinical psychology as a profession, research methods used in clinical psychology, issues in diagnosis and classification of disorders, techniques used in the assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, various approaches to therapeutic intervention, and issues related to ethics, professionalism, and training in clinical psychology. Throughout this course we will review and integrate relevant research in the field of clinical neuroscience with our discussion and understanding of clinical psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 103: Intergroup Communication (CSRE 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication. The objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity. If you are interested in enrolling in this class, please fill out the following survey to be considered- https://tinyurl.com/psych103fall2019. After filling out this survey, you do not need to reach out any further. In order to be fully considered for enrollment in the class, you must attend the first day of class. Enrollment will not be offered to those who are not present on the first day.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

PSYCH 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (CSRE 103F)

Are you interested in strengthening your skills as a facilitator or section leader? Interested in opening up dialogue around identity within your community or among friends? This course will provide you with facilitation tools and practice, but an equal part of the heart of this class will come from your own reflection on the particular strengths and challenges you may bring to facilitation and how to craft a personal style that works best for you. This reflection process is ongoing, for the instructors as well as the students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

PSYCH 140: Introduction to Psycholinguistics (LINGUIST 145, LINGUIST 245A)

How do people do things with language? How do we go from perceiving the acoustic waves that reach our ears to understanding that someone just announced the winner of the presidential election? How do we go from a thought to spelling that thought out in a sentence? How do babies learn language from scratch? This course is a practical introduction to psycholinguistics -- the study of how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. The course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of both the research methodologies used in psycholinguistic research and many of the well-established findings in the field. Topics covered will include visual and auditory recognition of words, sentence comprehension, reading, discourse and inference, sentence production, language acquisition, language in the brain, and language disorders. Students will conduct a small but original research project and gain experience with reporting and critiquing psycholinguistic research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
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