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1 - 10 of 31 results for: PSYC ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYC 53N: Your Secret Mind: Getting to Know and Living with your Unconscious

Focuses on the motivational unconscious. Topics include the science of the unconscious mind and the techniques used to gain conscious access to these psychological process, as well as methods of exploring students' own unconscious for creative purposes and to understand personal habits, reactions, motives, emotions and thoughts. Case-based, problem-oriented format utilized to develop foundational understanding of the science of the unconscious mind. Emphasis on student study of self and own unconscious as case for the class. Student privacy will be protected.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Steiner, H. (PI)

PSYC 55N: Secrecy

What is a secret and why do we keep them? What is the cost - and the burden - of secret-keeping? The focus of this seminar will be professional secrecy, as we explore corporate confidentiality and the secret-keeping expected of all of us as professionals, and those who are engaged in issues of national security. Secrecy will be discussed in both ethical and practical frameworks. We will also explore psychology of secrecy, and secret-keeping in relationships. Students will begin to develop a personal ethic related to secrecy and will grapple with the intersection of secrets, lies and obfuscation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jacobs, J. (PI)

PSYC 60N: The Psychology of Stoked

Examines the biological, psychological and social aspects of what it means to live a positive, life-affirming existence. Drawing from a wide range of sources, from psychiatry and psychology, to spirituality and philosophy, seminar informs on the latest thinking about the psychology of happiness, and questions assumptions about personal happiness. Explores the new field of positive psychology and pulls from a multidisciplinary literature, examining life satisfaction and happiness from many perspectives, and the psychiatry of stimulation including substance, human sexuality, and healthy methods of attaining happiness. Includes guest speakers from many different backgrounds and perspectives. Examines what it means to be truly mindful.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PSYC 86Q: Psychology of Xenophobia

What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrati more »
What is the current U.S. socio-political climate like for Muslims? How is it affecting their mental health? Executive Order 13769, dubbed the "Muslim Ban", suspended the entry of citizens from multiple Muslim-majority countries and banned the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely. The "Muslim Ban" coincided with the highest level of hate crimes against Muslims in America (91% increase in 2017 per CAIR). These levels are comparable to post-9/11 levels of hate crimes. Decades of research on minority communities has documented how stress associated with stigma, intimidation and discrimination is detrimental to physical and mental health. In this seminar we will explore the historical implications of Islamophobia and its modern-day impact on the global refugee crisis. Students will be introduced to the stigma that surrounds mental health in general and minority communities in particular. Special attention will be paid to the development of the nascent field Islamic Psychology and integrating Islamic spirituality into therapy as a means of addressing the under utilization of mental health services in Muslim populations. A combination of stimulating group discussions, talks by guest speakers, and field trips to community partners will provide students with different perspectives and a deeper understanding of these topics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Awaad, R. (PI)

PSYC 111Q: The Changing Face of "Mental Illness" in Women: Historical, Medical and Artistic Approaches

In this seminar we want to take a look at women¿s lives beginning in the past century to the present and the many changes which occurred in conceptualizing and understanding mental illness. The female reproductive system has been linked to mental illness in women for centuries. The womb was believed to be the source of anxiety and depression, leading women to become `hysterical¿. But what does `hysteria¿ really mean, and how have historical and cultural attitudes towards women framed the study of women's mental health? How have the expectations of and demands on women and their role in society changed from the 19th to the 20th century? How have advances in health care and changing economic conditions influenced women¿s health? The course will introduce students to historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), eating disorders, the hysterias and functional neurologic disorders and infertility and postpartum depression will be analyzed more »
In this seminar we want to take a look at women¿s lives beginning in the past century to the present and the many changes which occurred in conceptualizing and understanding mental illness. The female reproductive system has been linked to mental illness in women for centuries. The womb was believed to be the source of anxiety and depression, leading women to become `hysterical¿. But what does `hysteria¿ really mean, and how have historical and cultural attitudes towards women framed the study of women's mental health? How have the expectations of and demands on women and their role in society changed from the 19th to the 20th century? How have advances in health care and changing economic conditions influenced women¿s health? The course will introduce students to historical and current concepts of mental illness in women. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS), eating disorders, the hysterias and functional neurologic disorders and infertility and postpartum depression will be analyzed through a historical bio-psycho-social lens. Historical reading will include primary sources, such as women¿s diaries and physicians¿ casebooks and medical case records, as well as secondary sources such as advice books, and 19th- and 20th-century medical texts. Guest speakers from the art history and literature departments will stimulate dialogue regarding literary and artistic images and the social and cultural contexts of these disorders. Importantly, we will examine the changing face of "mental illness in women" in art, literature and medicine--the evolution of diversity in represented voices and the current methods of researching and treating the interface between the female reproductive cycle and psychiatric illness in diverse populations of women. Embedded within each lecture will be break-out sessions with opportunities for students to ask questions and to discuss a topic in greater depth. Students will have the opportunity to complete their own interdisciplinary projects for the course. Prior projects have included not only power point presentations of diverse topics, but also short films and stories, and future women's mental health research project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PSYC 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 114, CEE 214, MED 114, MED 214)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. We will see a fusion of technologies and research that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres. As Industry 4.0 and the next revolution is transforming humanity, this course explores the development and application of key emerging technologies in society: AI/ML; Additive Manufacturing and Advanced Robotics; Smart Cities and Urban Mobility; Advanced Life Sciences; Blockchain; Telecommunications with 5G; and Data Privacy, Ethics, and Policy.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

PSYC 124: Brain Plasticity

Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's remarkable ability to modify its own structure and function. The brain does so in response to changes in the body or in the external environment, adjusting parameters from molecules to neurons. In this course, we will cover the overarching principles of brain plasticity: how the brain comes to mirror the details of the outside world, how it adjusts itself based on sensory deficits, how new sensory capacities can be added, how circuitry is modified by activities and goals, why it's harder to teach an old dog new tricks, how we remember, and disorders of plasticity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PSYC 130: How to Think Like a Shrink

This course will teach you how to think (or experience) yourself and the communities around you as a therapist does. That means coming to understand why therapists focus on early life relationships and learning, why we privilege emotions, and why we see the seeming contradictions in our lives as places for deeper understanding. In class discussions, we will consider questions such as: How do our early experiences in relationships affect the ones we create later? Why are we more likely to segregate and point fingers when we are afraid? How can we make better use of our precious capacity for attention? What good might come from anger, sadness or guilt? Projects will include looking at how the psychological phenomena we will learn about play out in public spheres and personal ones. This is not a class about mental health, but rather about the intricacy of our feeling and thinking minds. The course will be discussion-based with a focus on experiential learning, and include weekly projects more »
This course will teach you how to think (or experience) yourself and the communities around you as a therapist does. That means coming to understand why therapists focus on early life relationships and learning, why we privilege emotions, and why we see the seeming contradictions in our lives as places for deeper understanding. In class discussions, we will consider questions such as: How do our early experiences in relationships affect the ones we create later? Why are we more likely to segregate and point fingers when we are afraid? How can we make better use of our precious capacity for attention? What good might come from anger, sadness or guilt? Projects will include looking at how the psychological phenomena we will learn about play out in public spheres and personal ones. This is not a class about mental health, but rather about the intricacy of our feeling and thinking minds. The course will be discussion-based with a focus on experiential learning, and include weekly projects that will have you playing detective in your own life. Prerequisites include a high degree of honesty (or the desire for this), creativity and an interest in the human experience. The course may include a field trip to a sensory deprivation float tank as we study attention. At the end of the seminar, I hope you will have a greater appreciation for the complexity of your mind and reactions, and the psychology of everyday life -- personal relationships, group functioning, tiffs between political parties. My aim is to have you learn to both take yourself very seriously and not seriously at all. This course will provide no answers, however I hope it will open channels of thought and discussion, and make your own life a little richer. Pre-Requisites: 1. High degree of honesty or a desire for this. 2. Write 1-2 paragraphs explaining why you are interested in this class and or/an event from life that has touched upon one of the class topics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Tversky, D. (PI)

PSYC 135: Dement's Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the worlds first university undergraduate-level course on the science of sleep. Now as an emeritus professor, he continues to be actively involved in the course teaching many of the lectures and sometimes driving students to class in his golf cart! The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Rasgon, N. (PI)
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