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1 - 10 of 20 results for: PSYC ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYC 51Q: Culture, Psychology, and Mental Health Treatment

Focuses on a critical analysis of Western approach to psychology and psychiatric terms of understanding mental illness, psychiatric phenomena, and treatment of mental health disorders. Includes an orientation to and critique of western clinical psychology/psychiatry and an inquity as to its relevance outside Western settings. Includes guest speakers representing cross-cultural providers of mental health services as well as medical anthropologists and critics of the Western generalizations in psychiatry. Special attention place on cross-cultural psychiatry and international mental health efforts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYC 53Q: Your Secret Mind: Getting to Know and Living with your Unconscious

Focuses on the motivational unconscious. Topics include the science of the unconscious mind and the techniques used to gain conscious access to these psychological process, as well as methods of exploring students' own unconscious for creative purposes and to understand personal habits, reactions, motives, emotions and thoughts. Case-based, problem-oriented format utilized to develop foundational understanding of the science of the unconscious mind. Emphasis on student study of self and own unconscious as case for the class. Student privacy will be protected.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Steiner, H. (PI)

PSYC 124: Brain Plasticity

Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's remarkable ability to modify its own structure and function. The brain does so in response to changes in the body or in the external environment, adjusting parameters from molecules to neurons. In this course, we will cover the overarching principles of brain plasticity: how the brain comes to mirror the details of the outside world, how it adjusts itself based on sensory deficits, how new sensory capacities can be added, how circuitry is modified by activities and goals, why it's harder to teach an old dog new tricks, how we remember, and disorders of plasticity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the world¿s first university undergraduate-level course on the science of sleep. Now as an emeritus professor, he continues to be actively involved in the course teaching many of the lectures and sometimes driving students to class in his golf cart! The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 136B: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live and Die Well (PSYC 236B)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience, strategies for overcoming these, and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 139: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 239)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rasgon, N. (PI)

PSYC 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Chetty, S. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; Cosgrove, V. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Fung, L. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Guilleminault, C. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hosseini, H. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; Mason, D. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; McGovern, M. (PI) ; Mccaslin, S. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ordaz, S. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Sadeh Sharvit, S. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Saggar, M. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; White-Huber, B. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (SI) ; Hardan, A. (SI) ; Lock, J. (SI) ; Manber, R. (SI) ; Singh, M. (SI) ; Tarshis, T. (SI) ; Taylor, C. (SI)

PSYC 223B: Topics in Neurodiversity: Design Thinking Approaches

The course provides essential background about neurodiversity, the design thinking process and the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework to guide students in developing projects that maximize the potential of neurodiversity. Through case studies, field trips, guest speakers, and community engagement, students will explore approaches to maximizing inclusivity in realms such as education, employment, community and beyond. Students will use their knowledge to design and develop (or revising and enhance) processes, systems, experiences and/or products to maximize inclusivity and the potential of neurodiverse individuals. Based on student's interests and areas of focus, projects may include digital tool development such as app concept and design, redesign of standard processes such as job interviews/ candidate evaluations, design and development of physical products or spaces such as sensory-sensitive dorm rooms, "stim tools" and more. All students taking this course will meet on Mondays; students taking this course for 4 units will also attend class on Wednesdays for "lab hours" which will support with project development. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all schools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 225: Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
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