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1 - 10 of 27 results for: PSYC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 83: Addictions in our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior

Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, cre more »
Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, creating an additional urgent need to discuss the implications this burgeoning problem. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction, and increase the student¿s ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYC 125: The Brain and the Law

How does neuroscience intersect with the making of laws, the punishment of criminals, and the development of rehabilitation? Is it a legitimate defense to claim that a tumor made you do it? How are the brains of minors different from adult brains? Should brain imaging be leveraged for sentencing? How should culpability be assessed, given that we're all steered by genetic and environmental influences over which we have no choice? This course covers the biological underpinnings that have legal consequences, with an eye toward designing evidence-based policy. Topics include responsibility, punishment, prediction, rehabilitation, brain death, genetics, competence, technologies, and ethics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Rasgon, N. (PI)

PSYC 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Chetty, S. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; Cosgrove, V. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Fung, L. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Guilleminault, C. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hosseini, H. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; Mason, D. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; McGovern, M. (PI) ; Mccaslin, S. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ordaz, S. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Sadeh Sharvit, S. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Saggar, M. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; White-Huber, B. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (SI) ; Hardan, A. (SI) ; Lock, J. (SI) ; Manber, R. (SI) ; Singh, M. (SI) ; Tarshis, T. (SI) ; Taylor, C. (SI)

PSYC 211: Developmental Psychopathology, Psychotherapy and Psychopharmacology

Common syndromes in child psychiatry. Topics include diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, course, outcome and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: familiarity with the basics of psychiatric and psychological discourse; psychiatry clerkship or course in psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

PSYC 213: Policy Practicum: Alcohol Use Among Stanford Undergraduates

(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. L more »
(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. Law students wishing to undertake R credit will perform additional research for a full report analyzing the issues and results of the collective research. R credit is possible only by consent of the instructor. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

PSYC 225: Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 229A: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy

This is part 1 of a year-long course which provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. In addition, this course will also provide direct instruction to students in the areas of activities of daily living (ADLs), social communication strategies, navigating social relationships, self-regulation, support in accommodations, and support in career development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3
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