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1 - 10 of 31 results for: PHYSICS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 25: Modern Physics

How do the discoveries since the dawn of the 20th century impact our understanding of 21st-century physics? This course introduces the foundations of modern physics: Einstein's theory of special relativity and quantum mechanics. Combining the language of physics with tools from algebra and trigonometry, students gain insights into how the universe works on both the smallest and largest scales. Topics may include atomic, molecular, and laser physics; semiconductors; elementary particles and the fundamental forces; nuclear physics (fission, fusion, and radioactivity); astrophysics and cosmology (the contents and evolution of the universe). Emphasis on applications of modern physics in everyday life, progress made in our understanding of the universe, and open questions that are the subject of active research. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 23 or PHYSICS 23S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Irwin, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 26: Modern Physics Laboratory

Guided hands-on and simulation-based exploration of concepts in modern physics, including special relativity, quantum mechanics and nuclear physics with an emphasis on student predictions, observations and explanations. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 25.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

PHYSICS 41: Mechanics

How are motions of objects in the physical world determined by laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and then understand why motions have the form they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how the important physical principles in mechanics, such as conservation of momentum and energy for translational and rotational motion, follow from just three laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion. Distinction made between fundamental laws of nature and empirical rules that are useful approximations for more complex physics. Problems drawn from examples of mechanics in everyday life. Skills developed in verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Discussions based on language of mathematics, particularly vector representations and operations, and calculus. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on inte more »
How are motions of objects in the physical world determined by laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and then understand why motions have the form they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how the important physical principles in mechanics, such as conservation of momentum and energy for translational and rotational motion, follow from just three laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion. Distinction made between fundamental laws of nature and empirical rules that are useful approximations for more complex physics. Problems drawn from examples of mechanics in everyday life. Skills developed in verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Discussions based on language of mathematics, particularly vector representations and operations, and calculus. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Spring 2020-21: Class will be taught remote synchronously in active learning format with much of the learning in smaller breakout rooms so class will not be recorded. Please enroll in a section that you can attend regularly. In order to register for this class all FROSH must complete the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Students who complete the Physics Placement Diagnostic by 3 PM (Pacific) on Friday will have their hold lifted over the weekend. Minimum prerequisites: High school physics and MATH 20 (or high school calculus if sufficiently rigorous). Minimum co-requisite: MATH 21 or equivalent. Since high school math classes vary widely, it is recommended that you take at least one math class at Stanford before or concurrently with taking Physics 41. In addition, it is recommended that you take Math 51 or CME 100 before taking the next course in the Physics 40 series, Physics 43.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 42: Classical Mechanics Laboratory

Hands-on exploration of concepts in classical mechanics: Newton's laws, conservation laws, rotational motion. Introduction to laboratory techniques, experimental equipment and data analysis. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 41nnIn this unusual pandemic year we have planned remote lab activity for you. These labs are a mix of online labs as well as hands-on exercises you can do at home, in a dorm or wherever you may be. The class will be structured with an online Zoom section, where you and others in your section will meet with a TA and go over your results, and do some group exercises. You can do the online materials with a virtual lab partner, we encourage you to get the benefit of someone to collaborate on your analysis and observations.nnWe will be sending every enrolled student a kit of hands-on lab materials, you will get more details the first week of class.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

PHYSICS 94SI: Diverse Perspectives in Physics

Have you ever wondered what it is like to be a professor, or what you could do with physics beyond academia? Do you want to hear about the life stories of people with diverse backgrounds who have studied or are studying physics? Professors and industry researchers possessing a diverse set of identities and backgrounds will share their journey in physics and their career trajectories, emphasizing their personal lives and experiences as undergraduates and graduate students. A Q&A session will follow.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

PHYSICS 100: Introduction to Observational Astrophysics

Designed for undergraduate physics majors but open to all students with a calculus-based physics background and some laboratory and coding experience. Students make and analyze observations using the telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Topics covered include navigating the night sky, the physics of stars and galaxies, telescope instrumentation and operation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques, quantitative error analysis, and effective scientific communication. The course concludes with an independent project where student teams propose and execute an observational astronomy project of their choosing, using techniques learned in class to gather and analyze their data, and presenting their findings in the forms of professional-style oral presentations and research papers. Enrollment by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/~elva/physics100prelim.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Allen, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 106: Experimental Methods in Quantum Physics

Experimental physics lab course aimed at providing an understanding of and appreciation for experimental methods in physics, including the capabilities and limitations, both fundamental and technical. Students perform experiments that use optics, lasers, and electronics to measure fundamental constants of nature, perform measurements at the atomic level, and analyze results. Goals include developing an understanding of measurement precision and accuracy through concepts of spectral-analysis of coherent signals combined with noise. We explore the fundamental limits to measurement set by thermal noise at finite temperature, as well as optical shot-noise in photo-detection that sets the standard quantum limit in detecting light. Spectroscopy of light emitted from atoms reveals the quantum nature of atomic energy levels, and when combined with theoretical models provides information on atomic structure and fundamental constants of nature (e.g. the fine structure constant that characterizes more »
Experimental physics lab course aimed at providing an understanding of and appreciation for experimental methods in physics, including the capabilities and limitations, both fundamental and technical. Students perform experiments that use optics, lasers, and electronics to measure fundamental constants of nature, perform measurements at the atomic level, and analyze results. Goals include developing an understanding of measurement precision and accuracy through concepts of spectral-analysis of coherent signals combined with noise. We explore the fundamental limits to measurement set by thermal noise at finite temperature, as well as optical shot-noise in photo-detection that sets the standard quantum limit in detecting light. Spectroscopy of light emitted from atoms reveals the quantum nature of atomic energy levels, and when combined with theoretical models provides information on atomic structure and fundamental constants of nature (e.g. the fine structure constant that characterizes the strength of all electro-magnetic interactions, and the ratio of the electron mass to the proton mass, me/mp. Experiments may include laser spectroscopy to determine the interatomic potential, effective spring constant, and binding energy of a diatomic molecule, or measure the speed of light. This course will provide hands-on experience with semiconductor diode lasers, basic optics, propagation and detection of optical beams, and related electronics and laboratory instrumentation.nFor lab notebooks the class uses an integrated online environment for data analysis, curve fitting, (system is based on Jupyter notebooks, Python, and document preparation). Prerequisites: PHYSICS 40 series and PHYSICS 70, or 60 series, PHYSICS 120, PHYSICS 130; some familiarity with basic electronics is helpful but not required. Very basic programming in Python is needed, but background with Matlab, Origin, or similar software should be sufficient to come up to speed for the data analysis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Hollberg, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 121: Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism II

Conservation laws and electromagnetic waves, Poynting's theorem, tensor formulation, potentials and fields. Plane wave problems (free space, conductors and dielectric materials, boundaries). Dipole and quadruple radiation. Special relativity and transformation between electric and magnetic fields. Prerequisites: PHYS 120 and PHYS 111 or MATH 131P or MATH 173; Recommended: PHYS 112.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4
Instructors: Kallosh, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 131: Quantum Mechanics II

Identical particles; Fermi and Bose statistics. Time-independent perturbation theory. Fine structure, the Zeeman effect and hyperfine splitting in the hydrogen atom. Time-dependent perturbation theory. Variational principle and WKB approximation. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 120, PHYSICS 130, PHYSICS 111 or MATH 131P, or MATH 173. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 121.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Qi, X. (PI)
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