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1 - 10 of 52 results for: PHIL ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHIL 20N: Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

Is it really possible for an artificial system to achieve genuine intelligence: thoughts, consciousness, emotions? What would that mean? How could we know if it had been achieved? Is there a chance that we ourselves are artificial intelligences? Would artificial intelligences, under certain conditions, actually be persons? If so, how would that affect how they ought to be treated and what ought to be expected of them? Emerging technologies with impressive capacities already seem to function in ways we do not fully understand. What are the opportunities and dangers that this presents? How should the promises and hazards of these technologies be managed?nnPhilosophers have studied questions much like these for millennia, in scholarly debates that have increased in fervor with advances in psychology, neuroscience, and computer science. The philosophy of mind provides tools to carefully address whether genuine artificial intelligence and artificial personhood are possible. Epistemology (th more »
Is it really possible for an artificial system to achieve genuine intelligence: thoughts, consciousness, emotions? What would that mean? How could we know if it had been achieved? Is there a chance that we ourselves are artificial intelligences? Would artificial intelligences, under certain conditions, actually be persons? If so, how would that affect how they ought to be treated and what ought to be expected of them? Emerging technologies with impressive capacities already seem to function in ways we do not fully understand. What are the opportunities and dangers that this presents? How should the promises and hazards of these technologies be managed?nnPhilosophers have studied questions much like these for millennia, in scholarly debates that have increased in fervor with advances in psychology, neuroscience, and computer science. The philosophy of mind provides tools to carefully address whether genuine artificial intelligence and artificial personhood are possible. Epistemology (the philosophy of knowledge) helps us ponder how we might be able to know. Ethics provides concepts and theories to explore how all of this might bear on what ought to be done. We will read philosophical writings in these areas as well as writings explicitly addressing the questions about artificial intelligence, hoping for a deep and clear understanding of the difficult philosophical challenges the topic presents.nnNo background in any of this is presupposed, and you will emerge from the class having made a good start learning about computational technologies as well as a number of fields of philosophical thinking. It will also be a good opportunity to develop your skills in discussing and writing critically about complex issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PHIL 22Q: Being Reasonable

In everyday life, we ask each other to be reasonable, and we fault unreasonable behavior in ourselves and others. Moreover, the Anglo-American legal system makes extensive use of the ¿reasonable person standard¿ in everything from negligence to administrative law. What is it to be a reasonable person? What do we mean by ¿reasonable¿? This course will look at applications of the concept, and attempts by philosophers and legal theorists to understand what reasonableness is. We¿ll also look at criticisms of the use of the concept by feminist and critical legal theorists.nnCourse expectations: Philosophy involves lots of independence of mind, and you spend a lot of time reading and then writing, in order to sort out what you think. It also involves lots of time spent with others, discussing ideas and arguments. Our class will divide into time you spend reading and writing reactions to your reading (budget about 5 hours per week), and then hours spent together, in a free-ranging question an more »
In everyday life, we ask each other to be reasonable, and we fault unreasonable behavior in ourselves and others. Moreover, the Anglo-American legal system makes extensive use of the ¿reasonable person standard¿ in everything from negligence to administrative law. What is it to be a reasonable person? What do we mean by ¿reasonable¿? This course will look at applications of the concept, and attempts by philosophers and legal theorists to understand what reasonableness is. We¿ll also look at criticisms of the use of the concept by feminist and critical legal theorists.nnCourse expectations: Philosophy involves lots of independence of mind, and you spend a lot of time reading and then writing, in order to sort out what you think. It also involves lots of time spent with others, discussing ideas and arguments. Our class will divide into time you spend reading and writing reactions to your reading (budget about 5 hours per week), and then hours spent together, in a free-ranging question and answer session, and a more formal, focused discussion of the reading (about 2 hours per week). You¿ll be working on a final short paper throughout the quarter. You should have a reliable internet connection. We¿ll talk via Zoom and use Canvas for shared reading reactions. First preference to Sophomores; second preference to Freshman. Enrollment Cap 10. No prior Philosophy courses needed.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lawlor, K. (PI)

PHIL 71H: Introduction to Aesthetics

Aesthetics encompasses a seemingly special and particularly rewarding way of perceiving the world. Appreciating the beauty of a sunset, feeling moved by a piece of music, becoming absorbed in the composition of an artwork: these are all aesthetic matters, and they are all matters that lie at the heart of this course. We will begin by exploring core debates on aesthetic experience, aesthetic properties, and aesthetic value. But we will also venture into considerations of aesthetics in our everyday lives, aesthetic taste and our personalities, aesthetics and grief, aesthetics and gender, and aesthetics and race. By the end of the quarter, you will have a strong foundation in understanding this rich aspect of life we call aesthetics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Holliday, J. (PI)

PHIL 76: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, INTNLREL 136R, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

This course explores the normative demands and definitions of justice that transcend the nation-state and its borders, through the lenses of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. What are our duties (if any) towards those who live in other countries? Should we be held morally responsible for their suffering? What if we have contributed to it? Should we be asked to remedy it? At what cost? These are some of the questions driving the course. Although rooted in political theory and philosophy, the course will examine contemporary problems that have been addressed by other scholarly disciplines, public debates, and popular media, such as immigration and open borders, climate change refugees, and the morality of global capitalism (from exploitative labor to blood diamonds). As such, readings will combine canonical pieces of political theory and philosophy with readings from other scholarly disciplines, newspaper articles, and popular media.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

PHIL 80: Mind, Matter, and Meaning

Intensive study of central topics in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of language and mind in preparation for advanced courses in philosophy. Emphasis on development of analytical writing skills. nPrerequisite: one prior course in Philosophy, not including SYMSYS1/ PHIL99. Note: all courses labelled PHIL in the Bulletin (with the exception of PHIL99) count for this requirement. For the purposes of this requirement, Thinking Matters courses (labelled THINK) taught by a Philosophy faculty person also count as a course in Philosophy.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 82: Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change (COMM 180, CS 182, ETHICSOC 182, POLISCI 182, PUBLPOL 182)

Examination of recent developments in computing technology and platforms through the lenses of philosophy, public policy, social science, and engineering. Course is organized around four main units: algorithmic decision-making and bias; data privacy and civil liberties; artificial intelligence and autonomous systems; and the power of private computing platforms. Each unit considers the promise, perils, rights, and responsibilities at play in technological developments. Prerequisite: CS106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

PHIL 85: Topics in Philosophy of Medicine

In this course, we will address major issues in philosophy and medicine. Some topics will be well-known within the practice of medicine: informed consent, advanced directives, medical trials. Other topics will be more familiar to philosophers: the concept of health, self-deception, social construction of disability, visualizations of illness. We will do our best to interpolate these discourses, by combining readings in medical ethics with philosophical essays.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Jackson, G. (PI)

PHIL 107B: Plato's Later Metaphysics and Epistemology (PHIL 207B)

A close reading of Plato's Theatetus and Parmenides, his two mature dialogues on the topics of knowledge and reality. We will consider various definitions of knowledge, metaphysical problems about the objects of knowledge, and a proposed method for examining and resolving such problems. Some background in ancient Greek philosophy and/or contemporary metaphysics and epistemology is preferred, but not required. Prerequisite: Phil 80.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Code, A. (PI)

PHIL 127: Kant's Foundations of Morality, 2nd Critique (PHIL 227)

(Graduate students enroll in 227.) A study of Kant's ethical thought, focusing on The Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, The Critique of Practical Reason, and The Metaphysics of Morals. Prerequisite: Phil. 2, Phil. 170, or equivalent (consult the instructor). Designed for undergraduate department majors and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Friedman, M. (PI)

PHIL 151: Metalogic (PHIL 251)

(Formerly 160A.) The syntax and semantics of sentential and first-order logic. Concepts of model theory. Gödel's completeness theorem and its consequences: the Löwenheim-Skolem theorem and the compactness theorem. Prerequisite: 150 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR
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