2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 16 results for: PEDS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

PEDS 150: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 250)

How do race/ethnicity and social economic status contribute to health disparities, how are vulnerable populations uniquely at risk for poor health outcomes, and how does where we live and work influence our health status? Explore the processes through which social status and environmental determinants adversely affect health and drive inequalities. Discuss clinical, public health and policy solutions for advancing health equity from the perspective of health professionals working in multiple sectors. Other topics include: gender, age, individual and structural bias; language, education; vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); life course; environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic, green space, housing, food access, law enforcement, and media); and innovative community-engaged and policy solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 199: Undergraduate Directed Reading/Research

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Aby, J. (PI) ; Agarwal-Hashmi, R. (PI) ; Alexander, S. (PI) ; Almond, C. (PI) ; Alvira, C. (PI) ; Amieva, M. (PI) ; Ammerman, S. (PI) ; Amylon, M. (PI) ; Anand, K. (PI) ; Anderson, C. (PI) ; Ariagno, R. (PI) ; Arvin, A. (PI) ; Aye, T. (PI) ; Bacchetta, R. (PI) ; Bachrach, L. (PI) ; Balagtas, J. (PI) ; Barr, D. (PI) ; Bass, D. (PI) ; Benitz, W. (PI) ; Bentley, B. (PI) ; Bergman, D. (PI) ; Bernstein, D. (PI) ; Bernstein, J. (PI) ; Berquist, W. (PI) ; Bhargava, S. (PI) ; Bhutani, V. (PI) ; Bland, R. (PI) ; Blankenberg, F. (PI) ; Blankenburg, R. (PI) ; Bonifacio, S. (PI) ; Bressack, M. (PI) ; Browne, M. (PI) ; Buckingham, B. (PI) ; Buckway, C. (PI) ; Burgos, T. (PI) ; Butte, A. (PI) ; Butte, M. (PI) ; Carlson, J. (PI) ; Carmichael, S. (PI) ; Castillo, R. (PI) ; Castro, R. (PI) ; Ceresnak, S. (PI) ; Chamberlain, L. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, S. (PI) ; Cheng, A. (PI) ; Chin, C. (PI) ; Cho, M. (PI) ; Chock, V. (PI) ; Cohen, H. (PI) ; Cohen, R. (PI) ; Conrad, C. (PI) ; Contag, C. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cornfield, D. (PI) ; Cox, K. (PI) ; Crain, L. (PI) ; Crawley, L. (PI) ; DOSSANTOS, L. (PI) ; Dahl, G. (PI) ; Darmstadt, G. (PI) ; Dekker, C. (PI) ; Dorenbaum, A. (PI) ; Druzin, M. (PI) ; Dubin, A. (PI) ; Edwards, M. (PI) ; Egan, E. (PI) ; El-Sayed, Y. (PI) ; Enns, G. (PI) ; Feinstein, J. (PI) ; Feldman, B. (PI) ; Feldman, H. (PI) ; Fernandes, S. (PI) ; Fisher, J. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Frankel, L. (PI) ; Frankovich, J. (PI) ; Franzon, D. (PI) ; Friedman, I. (PI) ; Gans, H. (PI) ; Garcia-Careag, M. (PI) ; Geertsma, F. (PI) ; Glader, B. (PI) ; Glasscock, G. (PI) ; Golden, N. (PI) ; Gould, J. (PI) ; Govindaswami, B. (PI) ; Grady Jr., S. (PI) ; Grimm, P. (PI) ; Gutierrez, K. (PI) ; Halamek, L. (PI) ; Halpern-Felsher, B. (PI) ; Hammer, G. (PI) ; Hammer, L. (PI) ; Harris, S. (PI) ; Hintz, S. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hood, K. (PI) ; Horwitz, S. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hudgins, L. (PI) ; Huffman, L. (PI) ; Hurwitz, M. (PI) ; Imperial, J. (PI) ; Ismail, M. (PI) ; Jeng, M. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kache, S. (PI) ; Kahana, M. (PI) ; Kapphahn, C. (PI) ; Kaufman, B. (PI) ; Kay, M. (PI) ; Kerner, J. (PI) ; Kharbanda, S. (PI) ; Kim, J. (PI) ; King, B. (PI) ; Koltai, P. (PI) ; Krawczeski, C. (PI) ; Krensky, A. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; LaBeaud, D. (PI) ; Lacayo, N. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Leonard, M. (PI) ; Lewis, D. (PI) ; Limon, J. (PI) ; Lin, M. (PI) ; Link, M. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Loe, I. (PI) ; Longhurst, C. (PI) ; Loutit, C. (PI) ; Lowe, H. (PI) ; Lowe, J. (PI) ; Luna-Fineman, S. (PI) ; Maahs, D. (PI) ; Magnus, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, Y. (PI) ; Manning, M. (PI) ; Marina, N. (PI) ; Mark, J. (PI) ; Marsden, A. (PI) ; McCarty, J. (PI) ; McGhee, S. (PI) ; McNamara, N. (PI) ; Mellins, E. (PI) ; Mendoza, F. (PI) ; Milla, C. (PI) ; Misra, S. (PI) ; Moss, R. (PI) ; Murphy, D. (PI) ; Murphy, J. (PI) ; Nadeau, K. (PI) ; Narla, A. (PI) ; Neely, E. (PI) ; O'Brodovich, H. (PI) ; Oghalai, J. (PI) ; Olson, I. (PI) ; Pageler, N. (PI) ; Park, K. (PI) ; Peng, L. (PI) ; Penn, A. (PI) ; Perry, S. (PI) ; Pertofsky, C. (PI) ; Phibbs, C. (PI) ; Pico, E. (PI) ; Pizzo, P. (PI) ; Porteus, M. (PI) ; Potter, D. (PI) ; Prober, C. (PI) ; Profit, J. (PI) ; Punn, R. (PI) ; Rabinovitch, M. (PI) ; Ragavan, N. (PI) ; Rangaswami, A. (PI) ; Reddy, S. (PI) ; Rhine, W. (PI) ; Robinson, T. (PI) ; Robinson, T. (PI) ; Rodriguez, E. (PI) ; Roncarolo, M. (PI) ; Rosenthal, D. (PI) ; Roth, S. (PI) ; Ruiz-Lozano, P. (PI) ; Sage, J. (PI) ; Sakamoto, K. (PI) ; Sandborg, C. (PI) ; Sanders, L. (PI) ; Sarwal, M. (PI) ; Schrijver, I. (PI) ; Schroeder, A. (PI) ; Seidel, F. (PI) ; Shah, A. (PI) ; Sharek, P. (PI) ; Shaw, G. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Shepard, E. (PI) ; Shin, A. (PI) ; Sibley, E. (PI) ; Sivakumar, D. (PI) ; Smith, A. (PI) ; Song, D. (PI) ; Sourkes, B. (PI) ; Spunt, S. (PI) ; Stevenson, D. (PI) ; Stirling, J. (PI) ; Stuart, A. (PI) ; Sutherland, S. (PI) ; Sweet-Cordero (PI) ; Tacy, T. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Tierney, S. (PI) ; Twist, C. (PI) ; Van Meurs, K. (PI) ; Wall, D. (PI) ; Wang, C. (PI) ; Weinacht, K. (PI) ; Weinberg, K. (PI) ; Willert, J. (PI) ; Wilson, D. (PI) ; Wiryawan, B. (PI) ; Wise, P. (PI) ; Wong, C. (PI) ; Wright, G. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Wusthoff, C. (PI) ; Yen, S. (PI) ; Yuan, N. (PI) ; Contag, C. (SI)

PEDS 202B: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis (SURG 202B)

Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 224: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 226: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 226E, HISTORY 326E)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 228: Design for Pediatric Feeding Challenges

Feeding is a complex process involving coordinated interaction among several systems in the context of the parent¿child dyad. A disruption in any of these systems places a child at risk for a feeding disorder. This two-quarter class will focus on the pediatric population who have feeding challenges in the neonatal ICU, the labor and delivery room, and at home. Students will use design thinking methodology as a pathway for medical device and/or systems innovation. Components of the course will involve Immersive simulation, aspects of the Stanford Biodesign method for needs prioritization, and storytelling techniques for compelling presentations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 250: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 150)

How do race/ethnicity and social economic status contribute to health disparities, how are vulnerable populations uniquely at risk for poor health outcomes, and how does where we live and work influence our health status? Explore the processes through which social status and environmental determinants adversely affect health and drive inequalities. Discuss clinical, public health and policy solutions for advancing health equity from the perspective of health professionals working in multiple sectors. Other topics include: gender, age, individual and structural bias; language, education; vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); life course; environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic, green space, housing, food access, law enforcement, and media); and innovative community-engaged and policy solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 251A: Medical Ethics I

Required for Scholarly Concentration in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. The field of bioethics, including theoretical approaches to bioethical problems. Contemporary controversies and clinical cases. Values that arise in different situations and clinical encounters. Issues include: genetics and stem cell research, rationing, ethical issues in care at the end of life, organ transplantation issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 254: Pediatric Physical Findings Rounds

Pediatric patients with specific physical findings and hospitalized at LPCH are identified and introduced to students. Students in small groups examine patients at the bedside to note the physical finding and discuss it within the context of the patient's clinical problem. Emphasis is on basic science discussion to understand the cause of the finding.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: Prober, C. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints