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1 - 10 of 16 results for: MGTECON ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

MGTECON 300: Growth and Stabilization in the Global Economy

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy. By the end of the course, students should be able to read and understand the discussions of economic issues in The Economist, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, or the Congressional Budget Office.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MGTECON 526: Inclusive Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Developing Countries

Poverty rates have fallen markedly in countries around the world, as more households have joined the lower middle-class. Indeed, though U.S. income inequality has increased, inequality has fallen around the world. However, by developed country standards, poverty remains pervasive. What has caused the decline in rates of poverty and can we expect further decreases or can we act to accelerate the improvements? One answer is that countries that have experienced "inclusive growth", in which the growth of the economy (i.e., GDP) has elevated the incomes of the poor, have done better at creating jobs for the poor, especially in the private sector. Therefore, the class will consider the evidence on the factors that have contributed to inclusive economic growth in developing countries. A second answer as to why poverty has fallen, but remains at high levels, is that governments and aid agencies and foundations have targeted programs to the poor. This course discusses macroeconomic policy, targ more »
Poverty rates have fallen markedly in countries around the world, as more households have joined the lower middle-class. Indeed, though U.S. income inequality has increased, inequality has fallen around the world. However, by developed country standards, poverty remains pervasive. What has caused the decline in rates of poverty and can we expect further decreases or can we act to accelerate the improvements? One answer is that countries that have experienced "inclusive growth", in which the growth of the economy (i.e., GDP) has elevated the incomes of the poor, have done better at creating jobs for the poor, especially in the private sector. Therefore, the class will consider the evidence on the factors that have contributed to inclusive economic growth in developing countries. A second answer as to why poverty has fallen, but remains at high levels, is that governments and aid agencies and foundations have targeted programs to the poor. This course discusses macroeconomic policy, targeted government policies, aid, and entrepreneurship in developing countries. Examples will be given from Latin America, South Asia, and Africa. The course is co-taught by a Stanford economist and a World Bank consultant and will build on examples from recent experiences. The class is aimed at GSB students who are either intellectually curious about the topic or anticipate doing business in developing countries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

MGTECON 533: Economics of Strategy and Organization

The goal of this class is to combine economic theory and business practice to develop insights for business strategy and organization design. We will discuss strategies and organizations of companies, identify potential problems and explore potential solutions. Some of the topics to be covered will be why many established companies find it hard to innovate (and what strategies can mitigate those problems), business-model innovation, and what economic and practical problems arise when companies need to stop projects. The course will be based on a mixture of formal and informal cases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

MGTECON 602: Auctions, Bargaining, and Pricing

This course covers mostly auction theory, bargaining theory and related parts of the literature on pricing. Key classic papers covered in the course are Myerson and Satterthwaite on dynamic bargaining, Myerson on optimal auctions, and Milgrom and Weber's classic work, the Coase Conjecture results. We also cover a few more recent developments related to these topics, including dynamic signaling and screening. In some years we also cover topics in matching theory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MGTECON 605: Econometric Methods III

This course completes the first-year sequence in econometrics. It develops nonparametric, semiparametric and nonlinear parametric models in detail, as well as optimization methods used to estimate nonlinear models. The instructor will discuss identification issues, the statistical properties of these estimators, and how they are used in practice. Depending on student and instructor interest, we will consider advanced topics and applications, including: machine learning, simulation methods and Bayesian estimators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Reiss, P. (PI)

MGTECON 608: Multiperson Decision Theory

Students and faculty review and present recent research papers on basic theories and economic applications of decision theory, game theory and mechanism design. Applications include market design and analyses of incentives and strategic behavior in markets, and selected topics such as auctions, bargaining, contracting, signaling, and computation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Wilson, R. (PI)

MGTECON 616: Topics in Microeconomic Theory

This course covers foundational topics in microeconomic theory and is suitable for students who have completed the first year of their PhD studies and have taken a game theory or an advanced applied theory course. Sample topics include the notions of interactive knowledge and beliefs of economic agents, epistemics of solution concepts, strategies in continuous time and (adversarial) prediction testing. The course combines lectures with workshop sessions where students confront related research-type problems. Students are asked to present their original solutions to the class and are expected to participate in class discussions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Feinberg, Y. (PI)

MGTECON 618: Social Insurance and Urban Economics

The course covers various topics relating to social insurance. The first half of the course covers the rationale for government interventions into private insurance markets, adverse selection, social insurance design and the intersection between social insurance and intra-family insurance. The second half of the course covers local public policy through the lens of social insurance, and includes topics such as spatial equilibrium, placed-based policies and housing policy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MGTECON 628: Reading Group in Industrial Organization

This course meets weekly on Fridays at Noon. The primary purpose of the course is to read and discuss current working papers in Industrial Organization and related fields (e.g., Econometrics, Marketing, and Labor). Students are required to present papers a couple of times per quarter and both students and faculty may also present their own working papers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Benkard, L. (PI)

MGTECON 634: Machine Learning and Causal Inference

This course will cover statistical methods based on the machine learning literature that can be used for causal inference. In economics and the social sciences more broadly, empirical analyses typically estimate the effects of counterfactual policies, such as the effect of implementing a government policy, changing a price, showing advertisements, or introducing new products. This course will review when and how machine learning methods can be used for causal inference, and it will also review recent modifications and extensions to standard methods to adapt them to causal inference and provide statistical theory for hypothesis testing. We consider causal inference methods based on randomized experiments as well as observational studies, including methods such as instrumental variables and those based on longitudinal data. We consider the estimation of average treatment effects as well as personalized policies. Lectures will focus on theoretical developments, while classwork will consist primarily of empirical applications of the methods. Prerequisites: graduate level coursework in at least one of statistics, econometrics, or machine learning. Students without prior exposure to causal inference will need to do additional background reading in the early weeks of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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