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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 85 results for: MED ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice com more »
Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 30 units total)

MED 51Q: Aging, Dying, and End-of-Life Care

This is a Community-Engaged Virtual Healthcare Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting as follows: (a) Students will learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care in class through didactics and lectures by guest lecturers (b) Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers. Each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Due to COVID, all patient and family interaction will be virt more »
This is a Community-Engaged Virtual Healthcare Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting as follows: (a) Students will learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care in class through didactics and lectures by guest lecturers (b) Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers. Each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Due to COVID, all patient and family interaction will be virtual. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct virtual calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. (c) Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. (d) All students will complete a mentored capstone project (either individually or in small groups as they choose) and present this project at the end of the quarter. Our goal is to train future leaders in healthcare and especially in the space of aging and end-of-life care. PLEASE NOTE: This Introductory Seminar is a Cardinal Course. Students who enroll in MED 51Q will be working virtually with patients. As a prerequisite for patient-care, all students (a) must complete HIPAA training, patient safety training, and a background check. All tests required will be provided free of cost and have to be completed with specific agencies affiliated with Stanford. Failure to complete paperwork will result in student being dropped from the class. Dr. Periyakoil will send more specific directions after students are enrolled in MED 51Q.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MED 53Q: Storytelling in Medicine

Stories are at the core of medical practice, but the skills developed are applicable across disciplines, including technology and business. Storytelling in Medicine is a new sophomore seminar designed to teach skills in multiple modalities of storytelling including narrative, oral, social media, academic presentations and visual storytelling for different audiences. This seminar combines small groups, interactive workshops, and guest speakers who are experts in their fields of medicine. This will also include editing and support to complete your own story by the end of the seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MED 71N: Hormones in a Performance-Enhanced Society

(Formerly 117Q) Preference to first-year students. Explores how the availability of hormone therapy has affected various aspects of daily lives. Topics include the controversies concerning menopause and its treatment; use of hormones in athletics; cosmetic use of hormones to enhance growth, strength, and libido; use of hormones as anti-aging drugs; and how the hormone system has influenced our notions of gender. Includes the biochemistry and physiology of the human endocrine system; how hormones influence behavior, and how to read a scientific paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hoffman, A. (PI)

MED 73N: Scientific Method and Bias

Offers an introduction to the scientific method and common biases in science. Examines theoretical considerations and practical examples where biases have led to erroneous conclusions, as well as scientific practices that can help identify, correct or prevent such biases. Additionally focuses on appropriate methods to interweave inductive and deductive approaches. Topics covered include: Popper¿s falsification and Kuhn¿s paradigm shift, revolution vs. evolution; determinism and uncertainty; probability, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian approaches; agnostic testing and big data; team science; peer review; replication; correlation and causation; bias in design, analysis, reporting and sponsorship of research; bias in the public perception of science, mass media and research; and bias in human history and everyday life. Provides students an understanding of how scientific knowledge has been and will be generated; the causes of bias in experimental design and in analytical approaches; and the interactions between deductive and inductive approaches in the generation of knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MED 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 114, CEE 214, MED 214, PSYC 114)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to frontier technology, the intersection where radical forward thinking and real-world implementation meet. Topics covered include artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and advanced robotics, smart cities and urban mobility, telecommunications with 5G, and other key emerging technologies in society. These technologies have vast potential to address the largest global challenges of the 21st century, ushering in a new era of progress and change. Limited enrollment, contact instructors for application.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MED 164: Covid-19 Case Investigation and Contact Tracing (CHPR 235, MED 264)

In this service-learning course students will be learn how to identify people who have COVID-19 and those who have been exposed to people with COVID-19. Students will learn basics about the biology and health effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the epidemiology of COVID-19. Students will be taught important skills in healthcare communication including motivational interviewing, health education, and health coaching. Students will work as volunteers together with Santa Clara County staff to interrupt the chains of transmission of COVID-19 as they apply skills they have learned to help people with the illness and those who have been exposed understand the importance of isolation, quarantine, and other critical aspects of public health needed to control and manage this disease. Students will need to be willing to commit 20 hours per week to this course for 10 weeks over 2 quarters. Requires application and instructor approval. Please contact Course Director, Lars Osterberg MD, MPH for an application form and approval for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-6 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)

MED 181: Preparation for Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics

Training course for new undergraduate volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics (CFCs). Topics include introduction to methods for providing culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations, clinic structure and roles, free clinics in the larger context of American healthcare, foundations in community health, cultural humility and implicit bias in healthcare, motivational interviewing and patient advocacy skills, and role-specific preparation. Application only; must be an accepted CFC volunteer. Visit https://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. 1-2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
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