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1 - 10 of 52 results for: MED

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shorter, A. (PI)

MED 16SI: Pathways in Global Health

The goal of this class is to introduce students to the diverse pathways that contribute to Global Health. From epidemiology, to climate change, everyone is impacted, and the ways we address global health problems is multifaceted. Each week, there will be different speakers from various departments such as in biology, anthropology, medicine who will talk about their careers and perspectives in global health. The class experience with be an interactive speaker series, where students will learn and develop ways they can contribute to global health.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barry, M. (PI)

MED 110: Patient Health Advocate

The "Patient Health Advocate" course is designed to introduce students to population health concepts in primary care, providing a clinical experience and an opportunity to contribute towards patient care. With guidance from faculty members, students will learn important preventive health care topics, gain skills in patient health coaching, and design and implement a quality improvement project to address a population health measure of their choice. Students will also be exposed to clinical care through clinic shadowing and pre-visit planning with resident physician mentors.nnPrerequisites: MED 143A/243A or equivalent
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 147: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 159: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program ( http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 161C: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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