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1 - 10 of 41 results for: MED

MED 52Q: What is a Human? Scientific and Mythological Approaches to Meaning

Reconciling our mythology and current scientific consensus is a worthwhile pursuit to establish a balanced, congruent personal philosophy toward life. nIn this sophomore seminar, we will first explore scientific perspectives on the origin and evolution of humans utilizing archaeology, genetics, and evolutionary psychology. With this framework secured, we will sample major religious texts such as Genesis, The New Testament, and Eastern texts. Throughout the course, each student will have opportunities to reflect deeply on his or her own personal worldview (past, present, and future) to tailor a personalized philosophy for life. This course will provide you with an overview of a fascinating subject that can impact progress on your life journey and career.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 124: Global Child Health (HUMBIO 124C, PEDS 124)

This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 130: Yesplus: Meditation practices for wellbeing

Meditation Practices for Wellbeing" is a 1-unit course that provides students with tools and strategies to develop a sustainable approach to their happiness and wellbeing. Students will learn breathwork and meditation based techniques to decrease stress and increase peace and focus in day to day life. Students will also study happiness-based research and participate in community building discussions, yoga, and mindfulness processes to learn how wellness can be sustained as a personal practice. Class meets 5 evenings throughout the quarter, along with a mandatory mini retreat during the third week (Thursday 7 - 10 pm, Friday 7 - 10 pm, Saturday 12 - 3 pm). Open to all students, including freshmen and those new to meditation. Enrollment limited to 25. Admission by application, details at first class. See yesplus.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Advani, R. (PI) ; Ahmed, A. (PI) ; Ahuja, N. (PI) ; Akatsu, H. (PI) ; Al-Ahmad, A. (PI) ; Alizadeh, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Andrews, J. (PI) ; Annes, J. (PI) ; Arai, S. (PI) ; Artandi, M. (PI) ; Artandi, S. (PI) ; Asch, S. (PI) ; Ashley, E. (PI) ; Assimes, T. (PI) ; Ayoub, W. (PI) ; Baiocchi, M. (PI) ; Banerjee, S. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Basaviah, P. (PI) ; Basina, M. (PI) ; Basu, S. (PI) ; Behal, R. (PI) ; Bendavid, E. (PI) ; Benjamin, J. (PI) ; Berube, C. (PI) ; Bhalla, V. (PI) ; Bhatt, A. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blackburn, B. (PI) ; Blaschke, T. (PI) ; Blayney, D. (PI) ; Blish, C. (PI) ; Bloom, G. (PI) ; Bollyky, P. (PI) ; Bouvier, D. (PI) ; Boxer, L. (PI) ; Braddock, C. (PI) ; Brinton, T. (PI) ; Brown, W. (PI) ; Bulow, K. (PI) ; Carlson, R. (PI) ; Cartwright, C. (PI) ; Chan, D. (PI) ; Chan, G. (PI) ; Chang, C. (PI) ; Chang, S. (PI) ; Chaudhuri, O. (PI) ; Chen, A. (PI) ; Chertow, G. (PI) ; Cheung, R. (PI) ; Chi, J. (PI) ; Cho-Phan, C. (PI) ; Chu, G. (PI) ; Chua, K. (PI) ; Chung, L. (PI) ; Clarke, M. (PI) ; Clusin, W. (PI) ; Colevas, A. (PI) ; Colloff, E. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cooke, J. (PI) ; Cooper, A. (PI) ; Coutre, S. (PI) ; Crapo, L. (PI) ; Crump, C. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Das, A. (PI) ; Dash, R. (PI) ; Daugherty, T. (PI) ; David, S. (PI) ; Dawson, L. (PI) ; Deresinski, S. (PI) ; Desai, M. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dhillon, G. (PI) ; Dorman, J. (PI) ; Dosiou, C. (PI) ; Downing, N. (PI) ; DuBose, A. (PI) ; Edwards, L. (PI) ; Einav, S. (PI) ; Fantl, W. (PI) ; Farquhar, J. (PI) ; Fathman, C. (PI) ; Fearon, W. (PI) ; Feldman, D. (PI) ; Felsher, D. (PI) ; Fisher, G. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, P. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Ford, P. (PI) ; Fowler, M. (PI) ; Frayne, S. (PI) ; Friedland, S. (PI) ; Fries, J. (PI) ; Froelicher, V. (PI) ; Gabiola, J. (PI) ; Ganjoo, K. (PI) ; Garcia, G. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gardner, P. (PI) ; Gavi, B. (PI) ; Genovese, M. (PI) ; Gerson, L. (PI) ; Gesundheit, N. (PI) ; Giacomini, J. (PI) ; Glaseroff, A. (PI) ; Glenn, J. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI) ; Goldstein, M. (PI) ; Goodman, S. (PI) ; Goronzy, J. (PI) ; Gotlib, J. (PI) ; Gray, G. (PI) ; Greenberg, H. (PI) ; Greenberg, P. (PI) ; Gregory, P. (PI) ; Habtezion, A. (PI) ; Hallenbeck, J. (PI) ; Harman, S. (PI) ; Harrington, R. (PI) ; Harshman, L. (PI) ; Haskell, W. (PI) ; Heaney, C. (PI) ; Heidenreich, P. (PI) ; Henri, H. (PI) ; Ho, D. (PI) ; Hoffman, A. (PI) ; Holman, H. (PI) ; Holodniy, M. (PI) ; Hopkins, J. (PI) ; Horning, S. (PI) ; Hsia, H. (PI) ; Hunt, S. (PI) ; Ioannidis, J. (PI) ; Isom, R. (PI) ; Jernick, J. (PI) ; Ji, H. (PI) ; Johnston, L. (PI) ; Jones, E. (PI) ; Kahn, J. (PI) ; Kao, P. (PI) ; Kastelein, M. (PI) ; Katz, R. (PI) ; Katzenstein, D. (PI) ; Kenny, K. (PI) ; Khatri, P. (PI) ; Khazeni, N. (PI) ; Khush, K. (PI) ; Killen, J. (PI) ; Kim, S. (PI) ; Kohrt, H. (PI) ; Kraemer, F. (PI) ; Krishnan, E. (PI) ; Kummar, S. (PI) ; Kunz, P. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kurian, A. (PI) ; Kuschner, W. (PI) ; Ladabaum, U. (PI) ; Lafayette, R. (PI) ; Laport, G. (PI) ; Laws, A. (PI) ; Lee, D. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Lee, P. (PI) ; Leung, L. (PI) ; Levin, E. (PI) ; Levitt, L. (PI) ; Levy, R. (PI) ; Levy, S. (PI) ; Liang, D. (PI) ; Liedtke, M. (PI) ; Lin, B. (PI) ; Lindsay, A. (PI) ; Lorig, K. (PI) ; Lotfi, J. (PI) ; Lowe, A. (PI) ; Lowsky, R. (PI) ; Luby, S. (PI) ; Lutchman, G. (PI) ; Majeti, R. (PI) ; McConnell, M. (PI) ; McLaughlin, T. (PI) ; Medeiros, B. (PI) ; Meyer, T. (PI) ; Miklos, D. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Milstein, A. (PI) ; Mitchell, B. (PI) ; Mohabir, P. (PI) ; Montoya, J. (PI) ; Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI) ; Musen, M. (PI) ; Narayan, S. (PI) ; Neal, J. (PI) ; Negrin, R. (PI) ; Nevins, A. (PI) ; Nguyen, L. (PI) ; Nguyen, M. (PI) ; Nguyen, P. (PI) ; Nicolls, M. (PI) ; O' Callahan, P. (PI) ; Okafor, P. (PI) ; Osterberg, L. (PI) ; Owens, D. (PI) ; Palaniappan, L. (PI) ; Pao, A. (PI) ; Parnes, J. (PI) ; Parsonnet, J. (PI) ; Pasricha, P. (PI) ; Pegram, M. (PI) ; Periyakoil, V. (PI) ; Petersen, J. (PI) ; Pinto, H. (PI) ; Pompei, P. (PI) ; Popp, R. (PI) ; Posley, K. (PI) ; Price, E. (PI) ; Prochaska, J. (PI) ; Quertermous, T. (PI) ; Raffin, T. (PI) ; Rehkopf, D. (PI) ; Relman, D. (PI) ; Rizk, N. (PI) ; Robinson, B. (PI) ; Rockson, S. (PI) ; Rohatgi, R. (PI) ; Rosas, L. (PI) ; Rosen, G. (PI) ; Rosenberg, S. (PI) ; Rudd, P. (PI) ; Ruoss, S. (PI) ; Rydel, T. (PI) ; Scandling, J. (PI) ; Schnittger, I. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Schroeder, J. (PI) ; Shafer, R. (PI) ; Shah, J. (PI) ; Shah, N. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Sharp, C. (PI) ; Shen, K. (PI) ; Shieh, L. (PI) ; Shizuru, J. (PI) ; Shoor, S. (PI) ; Sikic, B. (PI) ; Singer, S. (PI) ; Singh, B. (PI) ; Singh, U. (PI) ; Skeff, K. (PI) ; Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI) ; Srinivas, S. (PI) ; Stafford, R. (PI) ; Stefanick, M. (PI) ; Stertzer, S. (PI) ; Stevens, D. (PI) ; Stockdale, F. (PI) ; Strober, S. (PI) ; Studdert, D. (PI) ; Tai, J. (PI) ; Tamura, M. (PI) ; Tan, J. (PI) ; Telli, M. (PI) ; Tepper, R. (PI) ; Tompkins, L. (PI) ; Tremmel, J. (PI) ; Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI) ; Tsao, P. (PI) ; Upadhyay, D. (PI) ; Utz, P. (PI) ; Vagelos, R. (PI) ; Valantine, H. (PI) ; Verghese, A. (PI) ; Wakelee, H. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warvariv, V. (PI) ; Weill, D. (PI) ; Weinacker, A. (PI) ; Weng, K. (PI) ; Weng, W. (PI) ; Weyand, C. (PI) ; Wiedmann, T. (PI) ; Winkelmayer, W. (PI) ; Winkleby, M. (PI) ; Winograd, C. (PI) ; Winslow, D. (PI) ; Winter, T. (PI) ; Witteles, R. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Yabu, J. (PI) ; Yang, P. (PI) ; Yeung, A. (PI) ; Yock, P. (PI) ; Zamanian, R. (PI) ; Zehnder, J. (PI) ; Zei, P. (PI) ; Zolopa, A. (PI) ; Zulman, D. (PI) ; de Jesus Perez, V. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (SI)

MED 201: Internal Medicine: Body as Text

Body as Text refers to the idea that every patient's body tells a story. The narrative includes the past and present of a person's social and medical condition; it is a demonstration of the phenotype. The art of reading the body as text was at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, but as technology has become ascendant, bedside skills and the ability to read the text have faded. Beyond scientific knowledge and medical facts, it is this often forgotten craft which is at the heart of the excitement of being an internist. This course introduces students to the art of the clinical exam, to developing a clinical eye, and learning to see the body in a completely different way. Enrollment will be based on a lottery system, for which details will be sent to first year students at the end of mini quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 210: Principles and Practice of Healthcare Quality Improvement

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in healthcare quality improvement, and provide tools for translating these principles into practice. Topics include: current state, A3, SMART goals, root-cause analysis, metrics and measures, PDCA cycles, process controls, systems, and sustainability. Students have the option of completing the course curriculum in conjunction with a quality improvement/patient safety project offered by the SMS Quality Improvement Interest Group. This course will meet for three in-class sessions throughout the quarter, with students reviewing the online materials before each session. Dinner will be served. May be repeated for credit up to three quarters with continued work on a quality improvement project, and all units count towards the Quality Improvement Scholarly Concentration.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
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