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  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 63 results for: ME ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ME 1: Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

ME 30: Engineering Thermodynamics

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ME 101: Visual Thinking

ME101 is at the foundation class for all designers and creative people at Stanford. It teaches you how to access your creativity through a series of projects, all of which have been redesigned so that they can be accomplished in an online learning environment. Visual thinking, a powerful adjunct to other problem solving modalities, is developed and exercised in the context of solving some fun and challenging design problems. Along the way, the class expands you access to your imagination, helps you see more clearly with the "mind's eye:¿, and learn how to do rapid visualization and prototyping. The emphasis on basic creativity, learning to build in the 3D world, and fluent and flexible idea production.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE

ME 102: Foundations of Product Realization

Students develop the language and toolset to transform design concepts into tangible models/prototypes that cultivate the emergence of mechanical aptitude. Visual communication tools such as sketching, orthographic projection, and 2D/3D design software are introduced in the context of design and prototyping assignments. Due to COVID-19 restrictions during AY20-21, in-person use of the Product Realization Lab may be limited or not permitted. Lab kits will be sent to enrolled students to support exploration of prototyping and mechanical design techniques that will be practiced during synchronous lectures and coaching sessions. Project documentation, reflection, and presentations are opportunities for students to find their design voice and practice sharing it with others. Prerequisite: ME 1 or ME 101 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

ME 103: Product Realization: Design and Making

ME103 will be taught entirely on line. While this has the obvious disadvantage of no physical PR access, we experimented with a recreated version of the course this past spring quarter. On line ME103 delivered excellent educational value. Student response was very positive. The course was a mix of published weekly recorded lectures, small group coaching sessions, a newly developed library of "Technical Notes", and kits of tools and materials given to each student for the purpose of rapid prototyping. We increased emphasis on CAD with good support for Fusion 360 as well as Solid Works. We increased emphasis on manufacturing processes including a redesign of projects assuming scaled manufacturing.Dave Beach, dbeach@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Beach, D. (PI)

ME 104B: Designing Your Life

This course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. The course introduces design thinking processes through application: students practice awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which hey want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. The course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in hands on activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Also includes roleplaying, assigned conversations with off campus professionals, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality. Open to juniors, seniors and 5th year coterms, all majors. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

ME 104S: Designing Your Stanford (EDUC 118S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational and vocational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes, explored through the design thinking process. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Expect ideation tools, storytelling practices, prototyping to discover more about yourself and possible paths forward. The course concludes with creation of multiple versions of what college might look like and how to make those ideas reality. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

ME 110: Design Sketching

Design Visualization, offers students a unique opportunity to acquire a new (visual) language over the span of one short quarter. nnnImagine a process whereby you can close your eyes, and, after a few short weeks, leveraging established Design Principles, open them, and imagine/draw virtually anything that comes to mind.... this is our pledge to you, independent of your previous sketching experience.nnnThis course melds basics with Industrial Design discipline (which creates the aesthetic, experience of products and services), dividing it into two parts; the ability to representationally draw in three-dimensions, while exploring the nuances of form & materials. ME110 initially focuses on the first component, building the structural foundation for perspective drawing, then introducing basic lighting and shading theory to 'complete the picture'. Analysis gives way to individual choice, as confidence builds. nnnWhile we express & explore solutions with traditional analog medium (pens, paper, etc.;-- supplied!), we bridge 'the digital divide', expressing final projects in several media choices, stirring in portfolio & professional advice enroute.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

ME 110B: Digital Design Principles and Applications

Building upon foundation design principles, project-based individual / group exploration and critique facilitates a self-guided learning process, where analytical problem-solving approaches are cultivated through real-time implementation in digital tools. A series of diverse projects are brought together in conjunction with related student project portfolio development. Class Prerequisites: Students must have completed ME110 with high levels of understanding, engagement. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: Scott, W. (PI)
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