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1 - 10 of 63 results for: ME ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ME 1: Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

This course is intended to be the starting point for Mechanical Engineering majors. It will cover the concepts, engineering methods, and common tools used by mechanical engineers while introducing the students to a few interesting devices. We will discuss how each device was conceived, design challenges that arose, application of analytical tools to the design, and production methods. Main class sections will include lectures, demonstrations, and in-class group exercises. Lab sections will develop specific skills in freehand sketching and computational modeling of engineering systems. Prerequisites: Physics: Mechanics, and first quarter Calculus.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3

ME 23N: Soft Robots for Humanity

While traditional robotic manipulators are constructed from rigid links and simple joints, a new generation of robotic devices are soft, using flexible, deformable materials. Students in this class will get hands-on experience building soft robots using various materials, actuators, and programming to create robots that perform different tasks. Through this process, students will gain an appreciation for the capabilities and limitations of bio-inspired systems, use design thinking to create novel robotic solutions, and gain practical interdisciplinary engineering skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Okamura, A. (PI)

ME 30: Engineering Thermodynamics

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE

ME 102: Foundations of Product Realization

Students develop the language and toolset to transform design concepts into tangible models/prototypes that cultivate the emergence of mechanical aptitude. Visual communication tools such as sketching, orthographic projection, and 2D/3D design software are introduced in the context of design and prototyping assignments. Instruction and practice with hand, powered, and digital prototyping tools in the Product Realization Lab support students implementation and iteration of physical project work. Project documentation, reflection, and in-class presentations are opportunities for students to find their design voice and practice sharing it with others.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3

ME 103: Product Realization: Design and Making

Students will build on the foundation created in ME102. ME103 includes structured labs in machining, casting, forming and welding; carrying a single project through the entire design process from conceptualization through presentation of a customer ready prototype, creation of a project based portfolio, and an introduction to manufacturing processes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Beach, D. (PI)

ME 104B: Designing Your Life

This course applies the mindsets and innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation. The course introduces design thinking processes through application: students practice awareness and empathy, define areas of life and work on which hey want to work, ideate about ways to move forward, try small prototypes, and test their assumptions. The course is highly interactive. The course will include brief readings, writing, reflections, and in-class exercises. Expect to practice ideation and prototyping methodologies, decision making practices and to participate in hands on activities in pairs, trios, and small groups. Also includes roleplaying, assigned conversations with off campus professionals, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. It will conclude with creation of 3 versions of the next 5 years and prototype ideas to begin making those futures a reality. Open to juniors, seniors and 5th year coterms, all majors. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

ME 104S: Designing Your Stanford (EDUC 118S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational and vocational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes, explored through the design thinking process. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Expect ideation tools, storytelling practices, prototyping to discover more about yourself and possible paths forward. The course concludes with creation of multiple versions of what college might look like and how to make those ideas reality. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

ME 110: Design Sketching

Freehand sketching, rendering, and design development. Students develop a design sketching portfolio for review by program faculty. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
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